Andrew Bartosh

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Bringing you the newest weekly addition to my blog, Wednesday Night Gaming. Stop by for other gaming/design/writing related material! Also, because I could totally use the hits. And criticism.

Wednesday Night Gaming: Blood Bowl: Team Manager The Card Game

Blood Bowl is a classic and beloved miniatures game, where the fantasy races of the Warhammer universe meet on the pitch to play some ball. And murder each other. In fact, mostly murder each other and maybe play a little ball on the side.

Oh, and strive as hard as they can to make their respective players cry as the dice destroy their hopes, dreams, faces, and spinal columns.

While I am not intimately familiar with the miniatures game, I have played a decent amount of the PC equivalent, which is a pretty fair match rules and gameplaywise. Also, it has allowed me to spare my opponents my miserable painting skills.

Anyhow, Blood Bowl: Team Manager The Card Game is a spin-off card game that puts the players in the seat of a (you’ll never guess) team manager. Your job is to make the decisions that will attract the most fans so you can get named Spike! magazine’s manager of the year. As a card game, it definitely presents quite a different experience, but is it truly game worthy of bearing the Blood Bowl title?

Let’s take a look!

Game Overview

Team Manager is a fairly simple and straightforward game.

Players choose one of 6 teams (Human, Dwarf, Wood Elf, Skaven, Orc, and Chaos) to manage.

The game is divided into five rounds (or weeks). At the start of the week, a number of Highlights are laid out, as well as a Spike Magazine card, which either has an immediate effect or provides an additional “Highlight” in the form of a tournament.

Each round, the managers will, in turn, assign one of their players to one side of a Highlight, resolving that player’s skills in the order they are presented on the card. These skills are Cheating (place a facedown cheating token on the player, which could do anything from increasing that player’s Star Power to getting them ejected from the matchup), Passing (move the ball, worth 2 Star Power if you control it, one step closer to your side), Sprinting (Draw a card, then discard a card), Tackling (attempt to tackle an opposing player, which will reduce their Star Power or remove them from the Highlight, using the tackle die). With the exception of the Cheating skill, all skills are optional. In addition, individual players may have additional unique abilities.

This will continue until every manager has played out their hand or passed. Once that happens, each manager counts up their players’ Star Power and compare it to the combined Star Power of the players on the other side of the match-up. Whoever wins will, in addition to the reward on their side of the Highlight, receive the reward in the middle of the Highlight. The loser only gets the reward on their side.

Tournaments are resolved similarly, but are not limited to two teams.

Rewards include generic Staff Upgrades (which provide a variety of bonuses to your team), Team Upgrades (similar to Staff Upgrades, but unique to each team), Star Players (big name or freebooter players that are added to your deck), and, of course, fans!

This will continue until the end of the 5th week, after which total fans are compared and the manager of the year is declared!

The Good

I have a serious soft spot for Team Manager and I feel the game does a pretty amazing job of capturing the feel of real Blood Bowl. Setting aside the artwork and the flavor text, which are fantastic, the game, at a gut level, just generates a lot of the same feelings that Blood Bowl does: the wonderful feeling of watching your best laid plans explode thanks to uncooperative tackle dice, or the sigh of relief as that final cheat token on your opponent’s board gets his Ogre ejected from the game.

Every team, generally, feels and plays fairly distinctively. Dwarves are tough as nails, Orcs are nasty blighters, Elves are quick and cunning, Humans are well-rounded, Chaos is nasty, and Skaven are filthy gits.

Despite only being listed for 4 players, the game is actually pretty modular. My playgroup has regularly played with 5-6 players instead of 4 with minimal alterations needed (game length and making plans for what happens if a pile is depleted). This does increase the game’s length, but is very helpful for larger playgroups.

The Whatever

Team Manger, for better or worse, is a fairly luck driven game. Your hand each round is random, the rewards you get are random, your tackle dice are random, your cheat tokens are random… there is a lot of random in the game. You can make fairly educated guesses about what is likely to happen on any given play, but there are a lot of times where you are just going to go into a week with a terrible hand, the tackle dice are going to hate, or your opponent is going to nail 6 cheats successfully and your 1 will get you ejected.

There are some pretty basic strategies that are no brainers which can lead to play feeling a little flow-charty at times. Start with your weakest players to claim Highlights and save your passes for the last play to control the ball. There isn’t a lot of room for effective variation there.

All told, this game is pretty “beer and pretzel” style-gaming. There is legit strategy to be had and someone who is good at the game will likely stomp someone who is bad, but there is going to be a lot of cursing luck and fairly mechanical interactions throughout.

The Bad

Pre-FAQ/Errata, there were some seriously out of whack cards in the game. Several Staff Upgrade cards were incredibly, ridiculously game changing for whoever got them (allowing for, if luck was on a manager’s side, incredibly brutal fan swings at end game). While the FAQ has basically made using them optional, I think this is a pretty half-hearted fix and significantly reduces the value of Staff Upgrades. The correct fix is probably to lock the max fans these cards can generate.

Dwarves had a similar problem, with one of their Team Upgrades being completely useless pre-errata. Thankfully this has been fixed.

It can feel very difficult, if not impossible, to catch-up if you fall behind early. I know this is somewhat ironic considering I was just bitching about Staff Upgrades that could allow ridiculous fan swings, but you can get pretty brutally buried after a bad starting week. Everyone else will have various upgrades and Star Players (many of which are quite powerful), and, if you end up with a hand full of Linemen, you are going to have trouble getting anything back that week, ten the next week will be even harder, then… etc.

Team Manager, for a somewhat light game, is surprisingly long, especially if you try to play above 4 (which, in the game’s defense, is not supported by the rules).

In case you haven’t noticed me mention it yet? Blood Bowl has a lot of randomness.

My Final Verdict

I think Blood Bowl: Team Manager is fun. Not quite as fun as real Blood Bowl and definitely not my favorite game, but it is fun. It is a light enough game for when I don’t feel like thinking hard, but it has enough strategy that it never becomes “Random Shit Happens.”

If you hate games that involve dice/luck/random chance, stay far away from Team Manager. Don’t even be in the same room as it. You will not like it. Luck permeates every inch of this game.

If you don’t mind a fair amount of randomness? Give it a shot. The game is relatively cheap and, well. Fun. Not “outplayed my opponent at Dominant Species” fun, but “Oh man, this is hilarious, pass me the chips!” fun.
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Jay K
United Kingdom
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Kent
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Fair points well made. And at least you don't ever end up with Analysis Paralysis playing this game.
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Zoran Ignjatovic
Hungary
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Thank you for the game review. Being a huge Blood Bowl fan, I already have Team Manager, but it was still enjoyable reading the write-up. It's nice to get other people's perspective on games, and compare mental notes. Thank you.
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Chris G
Canada
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Fair review. The game isn't for everyone, no game is. In our group it's generally loved or at least liked by most people that have played it though a few disliked it. But they also dislike most card games, that they've tested as well, like Dominion and other Deck Builders.

What I really admire about the game is that there is so much disparity between the races, the upgrades and even the rewards yet the game is extremely well balanced. There are some races combinations that do have an advantage over others in some situations but it's I've yet to find a definite win situation, there is enough random to keep it interesting and even it out.

The fact that they took the Blood Bowl concept and turned it into this game, while still managing to scratch a lot of Blood Bowl itches really amazed me.
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Rick Fuqua
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A nice review, for sure.

I played the game three or four times before buying a copy for myself and felt the level of randomness was about perfect. Reading the rulebook and card flavor text also tickled my funny bone the very same way the miniature game has always done.

But now that I own a copy of the game, and that kid in a candy shop look has been wiped from my face, I am a bit disappointed that the starting twelve players are not more varied and flavorful from team to team. After all, each team starts with the same number of linemen, and each lineman has exactly the same stats and Guard skill regardless of race. Beyond that, it seemed to me that Dodge would have made sense on a couple of Wood Elves rather than blanketting sprint across the team. So much Sprint ensures you will get your favorite players (AKA the treeman and any star players) out every week. I also feel that the Chaos team could have used a little higher average star power to match the strength of their counterparts in miniature land.

And like you said, once you are familiar with the game, there are so many obviously best choices: the first week go for upgrades and star players over fans, the final week go for fans, and always always throw out your linemen when you sprint or draft a freebooter. Guard is sometimes nice, but having a second copy of the player you want to protect is generally much better.

A friend of mine believes that this game is likely only to appeal to established fans of Blood Bowl and that those unfamiliar with the property may not get much out of it. I am on the fence. But it could account for some of the love it or hate it that many playgroups are experiencing.
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