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Subject: Forced Marches (Yet another question) rss

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Historian Plantagenet
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So my friend and I were having a great game when all of a sudden she takes one massive army placed on the English Chanel and executes a series of forced marches to reach my king in the north after just two impulses. Now the rules state a forced march can only be executed after the 4 MP limit is reached. So does this mean my friend's move was invalid as she would only have 2 or 3 MPs per impulse and thus did not reach the MP limit to execute a forced march? It seemed like a rather OP move on her part as lets face it, attrition roles are rather crap.

Also, how would one ever have 4 ops in an impulse except for use of the margaret ability + a 3 ops card?

Sorry if the wording in this question is a bit off. I really couldn't think of how to phrase it clearly.
 
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Stephen A. Cuyler
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Well, if I understand correctly, yes it is legal.

This is because MP are not OPS. OPS used for movement is to activate the leader, who then picks up the army and moves it.

All blocks have 4 MP to spend every impulse when moving, and a stack moves at the rate of the slowest member (assuming one block moved to collect the others. So assuming there is a valid path with no blocks in the way and only friendly shires (i.e - safe roads rule - 16.2.1), after moving the stack its full MP (4), she would then be allowed to cross one additional border, but face an attrition role for every block individually at a 2 in 6 chance for step loss for each block (leader is 1 in 6).

Assuming she started in Essex, and avoided the swamplands of the Fens and the treacherous waters of the Wash, and had safe roads the whole way, she could reach Northumberland in one impulse with a forced march. (Remember that one impulse represents months and months of actual time and that each turn is 3-5 years long).

Now there are a lot of ifs in that assumption, and there are plenty of things that you can do to mess with her on the way, such as making sure you have a string of defensive blocks to reduce the stack with a bunch of meaningless battles by skinning the cat as it comes north. Also, these blocks will remove safe roads at some point or points and slow the stack down to prevent it from getting to the King in one move. Bad roads, played at the start of her move would seriously hurt the timing of her attack, and perhaps even force her to reconsider.

She could also have done a sea move to get closer and then jumped you on the impulse after that. The short of it is that you are not truly safe except in exile.

Second question: 4 OPS in one implse per turn from Margaret, but remember OPS are not MPS.

Hope that clears it up for you. Who won, BTW?

-SAC
 
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Historian Plantagenet
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The game isn't over yet. We had to stop it at turn 4, but she is in the lead now after she pulled that move. Very frustrating as I had a total stranglehold on the game but when she killed Exeter (my sole heir/king) the crown automatically reverted to her despite my having more votes. I always play as Lancaster and I have yet to beat her because everytime I lose the throne I find myself facing a very tough uphill battle from that point on.

Thanks for the detailed response.
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Stephen A. Cuyler
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What happened to Lancaster? Did he die earlier (and leave you without Margaret as well)? Or did you simply take the penalty and not play the heir card?

Also, why did the crown revert to York? Or did she take it away in parliament?

Outside of Parliament, offices don't jump players, King included. So she doesn't get it automatically (despite Henry VII taking it from the dead Richard III's head historically). Parliament has to confirm the title. If you have more votes, you simply deny the crown to her by equalling her vote total and take the chancellor for yourself in the office phase.

Let us know what happens!

-SAC
 
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Historian Plantagenet
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I meant automatically in the parliament round, not the instant Exeter was killed off. This was turn 2 so I couldn't play the Lancaster heir card yet. Henry VI and York were both killed turn 1 and Exeter was king turn 2 and March was York's senior heir. When she killed Exeter with her massive army at the end of turn 2 we figured March would automatically become king turn 3 as Lancaster did not have any heirs to put up against him. Is this wrong?

At the start of 2 3 I made Lancaster my heir and we are now going into turn 4 with March as king, Rutland junior heir. We intend to finish the game tomorrow. We're both medieval PhD students so we have rather hectic schedules!
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Historian Plantagenet
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Well we finished the game today. She ended up winning politically. It was our best match yet. In fact, on one turn we actually tied on the votes. Since tie goes to the king she maintained the crown. It was very close in all aspects.
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