mike
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I think a number of folks are forgetting the most important step in their crowdfunding campaigns and that is building a crowd. To do that you need to become part of the community, well several communities one is all the people who buy and play games, the 2nd community is the industry side, other designers, publishers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers. The 3rd is the media, magazine publishers although there are very few of those these days, bloggers, podcasters, those who promote the industry.

The board game community is certainly unique in that these 3 groups overlap and that creates an opportunity for designers to connect with their potential customers at a level which is unheard of in most industries. Most consumer goods industries spend millions of marketing dollars each year on market research, focus groups, etc to try and figure out what their customers want. Sites like this provide that same insight at what would seem is no cost, but I would say there is a cost and that is your active participation in the community. So before you simply join a site and post a link to your campaign, take a step back for a moment and think about becoming an active member of the community rather than simply someone advertising their project.

So whether you’re new to BGG, or joining any of the groups on LinkedIn or Google+, take a moment, step back and introduce yourself, fill out your user profiles, tell people your story, why you are interested in games, game design and then talk about your latest project. If you want people to become interested in your crowdfunding campaign, then need a reason. Anyone can simply go to the store or shop online and buy a game, but with crowdfunding you have the opportunity to get people involved in your project, build a fan base and your own community around the project.
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80sgamer wrote:

So whether you’re new to BGG, or joining any of the groups on LinkedIn or Google+, take a moment, step back and introduce yourself, fill out your user profiles, tell people your story, why you are interested in games, game design and then talk about your latest project.


This is huge for me. If they aren't part of this community then they may as well be white noise. I am guilty of backing random projects, but I have gotten smarter and expect more from the creator then I used to. Not all projects, but A LOT of projects only see support from the BGG community and very few outsiders. This is reason enough to talk to us...instead of spouting adverts at us.
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Joe Pilkus
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Mike,

Well said, my friend. I've been an active member here and over at FFG for the past few years and it's one thing to have support from some of your "friends" at these sites, and it's something completely different, as I have the pleasure of experiencing, of having the backing of fellow-Arkhamites with whom I've debated an interpretation of a ruling, shared a session report, or discussed the style of play. It's a great community ~ and it's incumbent upon any Project Owner to gain that currency by sharing a bit of themselves with others.

Cheers,
Joe/the Professor
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mike
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I decided to write this as I have reccomended to a number of kickstarter projector creators recently that BGG was a great resource, although a few did not heed my advice to actually fill out a profile and take time to introduce themselves and just went link happy.

Next time I do that I'll make sure I outline a step by step process to joining and participating in the forum discusssions....

lesson learned there for sure
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Alex Lim
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That's absolutely true! This said, it still is very hard establishing yourself in the BGG community and gathering a fan base because you don't want to give the wrong impression and build forums and blogs that might seem like pre-advertisement. It's often really difficult trying to talk about your game idea without fear of giving off negative vibe.

I have a game that will be posted on Kickstarter in about a week, but through the time I've been part of BGG, I haven't really mentioned it. I've had the profile set up, website, facebook, tumblr, twitter...... But I'm not really sure how to introduce the kickstarter idea without becoming spammy.

Do you all have any advice? Should I do a blog on BGG (almost like a developer's diary or talk about gameplay mechanics of the game) or now start creating forum posts that introduce the game? I've used Geeklist and General Forums to ask questions about Print and Play and other topics ... would it be wise to follow-up with a pre-announcement of the game before I make the Kickstarter live?

Any and all advice is welcome!
 
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mike
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designers blog or WIP thread on the desginer forum are usually good choices

But if you're ready to launch the campaign then the designers blog would probably be more appropriate, then post to the kickstarter forum when the campaign goes live
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Robert Burke
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80sgamer wrote:

I think a number of folks are forgetting the most important step in their crowdfunding campaigns and that is building a crowd. To do that you need to become part of the community, well several communities one is all the people who buy and play games, the 2nd community is the industry side, other designers, publishers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers. The 3rd is the media, magazine publishers although there are very few of those these days, bloggers, podcasters, those who promote the industry.

The board game community is certainly unique in that these 3 groups overlap and that creates an opportunity for designers to connect with their potential customers at a level which is unheard of in most industries. Most consumer goods industries spend millions of marketing dollars each year on market research, focus groups, etc to try and figure out what their customers want. Sites like this provide that same insight at what would seem is no cost, but I would say there is a cost and that is your active participation in the community. So before you simply join a site and post a link to your campaign, take a step back for a moment and think about becoming an active member of the community rather than simply someone advertising their project.

So whether you’re new to BGG, or joining any of the groups on LinkedIn or Google+, take a moment, step back and introduce yourself, fill out your user profiles, tell people your story, why you are interested in games, game design and then talk about your latest project. If you want people to become interested in your crowdfunding campaign, then need a reason. Anyone can simply go to the store or shop online and buy a game, but with crowdfunding you have the opportunity to get people involved in your project, build a fan base and your own community around the project.


Very good point. There are a lot of very helpful people in the board game community! Go meet them!

I support as many small designers and independent studios as I can. But before you ask others to support your project, ask yourself how many you have supported.

When I see a KS project by someone that has not supported even a single KS project. I don't even watch the video.
 
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Trace
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Wow Mike, well said. Could this be stickied at the top of the thread?

just recently there have been a few KSers jump in and put up a post in the thread and run off having don their marketing, some have asked for and listened to advice, even changing things, others have almost shouted 'how dare you critique my work'. I would think this would be the first place you might come to early in your R+D and gather information and ask questions as almost any google configuration with the words "board game" has BGG in the top five at least once. I did read a post by a KS funding hopeful that the KS team told him to come here and post something [he was told after startup.]
Good luck to them all.
 
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