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Does your family generate a surplus of empty cereal boxes? Would you rather put this resource to good use than waste it in a landfill? Do you have a print-and-play or DIY game in need of a sturdy box? If you answered "yes" then you can solve all of these problems at once by making your own custom telescoping game box like the one pictured here:


Start by gathering a few humble tools and materials:

If you do not own a bone folder, you can either buy one from an art supply store, make your own folder from a knife blade, or you can wash out all of the ink from a ball point pen and use its tip to make the indentations. You can buy a combination square at most hardware stores. All-metal craft scissors are available at most craft supply stores and department stores that stock craft items.

Then download and follow the step-by-step pictorial instructions.

Slounger (in the step-by-step pictorial instructions) wrote:
DIY Telescoping Game Box

Features:
Recycle cereal boxes to make a custom two part (tray and lid) telescoping board game box. The modular design allows custom dimensions up to 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.75 inches (241 x 165 x 44 mm) from typical medium-large cereal boxes. Two-layer construction completely conceals factory printing while providing strength and stiffness comparable to commercial game boxes.

Materials Needed:
- Elmer's white all-purpose glue
- 4 cereal boxes in good condition
- Small scrap of 100 grit sandpaper

Recommended Tools:
- Combination square
- Straight edge
- Bone folder
- Hobby knife
- Heavy duty craft scissors

Not to be confused with the triangle-shaped speed-square or the fixed L-shaped try-square, the combination square has an A-shaped fence clamped via a thumbscrew to a moveable rule. Though the combination square can be disassembled and the rule used as a straight edge, having a separate straight edge saves time and effort. A bone folder resembles a very dull knife blade. It is used to make indented crease lines without cutting into and weakening the material. You can turn a used hobby knife blade into a folder by grinding the edge blunt and then smoothing it with a fine whetstone. Cutting through cardboard with a knife frequently leads to such problems as beveled cuts, torn and frayed edges, and straying from the intended path. The recommended procedure is to use a knife only as a precision marking instrument, and then to do the actual cutting with scissors. All- metal scissors specifically designed for crafting will work best. You need a tough tool with enough leverage to make precise cuts in a double thickness of cardboard.

Procedure:
Begin by calculating and recording the desired inside length, width, and height of the finished game box. Use these as the values of L, W, and H when constructing the bottom half of the box. For the top half of the box, increase L and W by 3/16 inch (5 mm) and H by 3/64 inch (1 mm). Use 1/2 inch (13 mm) as the tab width for both halves. Next open and flatten each cereal box, laying out the cardboard with the printed side up. Measurements, cut lines, and crease lines will be made on the printed side unless otherwise directed. The step by step instructions on the following pages show how to lay out, cut, fold, and assemble the parts. Although the top and bottom of the game box have slightly different dimensions, the procedure is the same for both. Note that in the diagrams, solid lines indicate where to cut and dashed lines indicate where to make crease lines with a bone folder. It is recommended to lightly rough the glossy printed surfaces using 100 grit sandpaper before gluing to improve adhesion. After gluing, clamp flat until fully dry to prevent warping.

Slounger (in the step-by-step pictorial instructions) wrote:


In the step-by-step instructions, black lines indicate existing cuts and creases from earlier steps, red lines indicate new cuts or creases, and blue lines indicate measurements.
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MyO the HedgeFox
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This looks nice. =)
 
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The last few steps in the directions may not be entirely clear from the pictures. I'll try to do a better job of explaining here.

Step 40:
Glue parts "B" and "C" onto the tabs of part "A".

Step 41:
Spread glue on the printed face of parts "B", except do not glue the tabs of parts "B". Fold closed.

Step 42:
Fold parts "B" 90 degrees into a vertical orientation. Then fold the tabs of parts "B" 90 degrees into the (future) planes of parts "C".

Step 43:
Spread glue on the printed face of parts "C". Fold parts "C" 90 degrees to meet the tabs of parts "B". Then fold parts "C" 180 degrees to enclose the tabs of parts "B" between the two layers of parts "C". Then glue part "D" to part "A", centering it inside the recess formed by parts "B" and "C".
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