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Subject: Is this a CCG or LCG? rss

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Tony C
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I'm a potentially new Shadowfist player, but I want to find out how much of a potential investment this game would be if I were to jump in. I've never played this in the past, so I would probably only plan on picking up the new CiK box to start. I've been told that it's all I need to start playing, which kinda makes it sound like a LCG. But I've also been told that you don't get full playsets of every card. Does this mean that I need to pick up multiple copies of CiK?

If this is still considered a CCG, does this mean that future releases will be done via booster packs like MtG or L5R?
 
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Brian M
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Well, in the past Shadowfist as a CCG, as you mentioned.

The Combat in Kowloon boxed set consists of 4 preconstructed decks, each of a different faction. I've only played a few games with them, but they seem to play well against each other.

Quote:
But I've also been told that you don't get full playsets of every card.

Well, you could theoretically use 5 of any card in a deck. You certainly don't get 5 of each card. I'm not sure you get 5 of any card. Which isn't a bad thing in my book - I'd rather have variety. But if you want to build any possible deck, just one set will not give you enough cards.

You really can't do much deck building with JUST the Combat in Kowloon box.

Future releases are supposed to be all fixed packs of cards. I suspect they will also not include 5 of each card.
 
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Clayton Threadgill
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Strictly speaking, "Living Card Game" is a trademark of Fantasy Flight Games. Inner Kingdom Games has decided to release Shadowfist under a similar model, but is calling it a "Dynamic Card Game".

Whatever the name, the point is that there will be no more randomized booster packs. Future expansions will be released as 50-card boxes, with 1 copy of each card in the box. You can purchase however many boxes you like - 5 will get you a full playset.

The first pack, called "Reloaded" was released along side the Combat in Kowloon box (and the Back for Seconds expansion).
 
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Tony C
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I guess my next question would be if my goal should be to run 5 copies of every card in my deck, or will I be ok running less. Also, is it generally a good idea to run multiple copies of unique cards in a deck?

Also, it was mentioned that all the decks in CiK play well against each other. Do they play well against older cards, or should I expect to have to hunt down some old cards to make the new decks more competitive? A lot of my friends who play now used to play before, so they play with old cards.

One last thing. Is it easy to tell the rarity on older cards?
 
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Clayton Threadgill
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aztecjoker wrote:
I guess my next question would be if my goal should be to run 5 copies of every card in my deck, or will I be ok running less. Also, is it generally a good idea to run multiple copies of unique cards in a deck?

For most decks, the only cards that get 5 copies are the foundation characters (the characters that do not require a resource to play, but provide one or two resources so that you can play your other cards). The CiK (Combat in Kowloon) decks each contain 2-4 copies of 4 different foundation characters, so if you bought two starter boxes you would have 4+ copies of each.

For all the other cards, the number of copies depends on how important the card is in your deck.
- 5 copies: You want to always have a copy in your hand, or you absolutely need to draw the card in the first couple of turns.
- 4 copies: The card is important to your strategy, and you want to see it early and consistently.
- 3 copies: The card is very useful or important, but you don't mind waiting until later in the game to see it.
- 2 copies: The card is useful enough to need more than once, but not critical. Alternately, the card is important, but only in the late game, so you include an extra copy that you can discard if you draw it too early.
- 1 copy: The card is very helpful, but not at all important to your real strategy. This is usually some kind of emergency one-shot effect that can turn the game around if you get it at the right time, like Potlatch, Avenging Thunder or Bite of the Jellyfish.

Most of these ideas apply to unique characters (or one-shot events) as well. If your attack strategy revolves around a particular character, it doesn't hurt to have another copy to play when your favorite fighter is smoked. Extra copies can also be discarded at the start of your turn - since you refill your hand every turn, a bad draw isn't the show stopper that it can be in Magic.

aztecjoker wrote:
Also, it was mentioned that all the decks in CiK play well against each other. Do they play well against older cards, or should I expect to have to hunt down some old cards to make the new decks more competitive? A lot of my friends who play now used to play before, so they play with old cards.

The pre-constructed CiK decks have performed quite well against older decks in my area. They're all designed to flow well, have some interesting combos, and play with a basic strategy, so they're quite capable of winning games.

That said, they are pre-constructed, and may falter against a strongly constructed deck. Since there are only 1 or 2 copies of most cards, they aren't as consistent as a deck built to perform the same tricks repeatedly. The best way to fix that isn't necessarily to hunt down older cards (although you certainly can), but to build up the particular cards you like so that you will get them when you need them.

If you are new to the game, I would recommend playing with the starter decks until you get a feel for what kind of plays you like, and what cards seem to work best for you. Armed with that knowledge, you can get a second CiK box or trade for more copies, and start modifying your deck to play your way. It won't take long before you have something that can compete with the classic tournament decks.

aztecjoker wrote:
One last thing. Is it easy to tell the rarity on older cards?

It depends on what set the card is from. Starting with the Dark Future expansion, the color of the set icon in the upper right corner of the card shows the rarity.
- Black with white outline for commons
- Grey with black outline for uncommons
- White with black outline for rares

Naturally cards from the 10,000 Bullets starter decks or the CiK decks all have the same icon, showing their fixed rarity. Since Shadowfist has converted to a non-randomized distribution model, all cards will be fixed rarity from now on.

If you are looking at an older card (from the original Limited Edition through the Shaolin Showdown expansion), all cards used the same set icon regardless of rarity. You can look up information on these cards through the online Shadowfist database at http://www.chimpshack.org/db/

(Note: At the time of this posting, the chimpshack database does not include the latest releases of CiK, BfS or Reloaded.)
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Tony C
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Cool. Thanks for all the info!
 
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Rory Cartwright
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Just to directly answer your question- I started playing after the initial Kickstarter, however, my playgroup exists entirely of veterans. My 'modern' decks (consisting of cards only from Kickstarter onwards) have always had no issues contending.
 
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