Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
24 Posts

Go» Forums » Strategy

Subject: Deception or bluffing in go rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
K K
msg tools
There are people telling me that go board game resembles Sun Tzu Art of War. While many parts of go might resemble Sun Tzu's philosophy, I find it difficult to discover the posibility of deception in go. (Sun Tzu said that in warfare, deception is important.

I hardly play go (I am still less than a beginner), but I am interested in understanding what posibilities exist in games. Go is a game of complete information, there is nothing hidden like cards in poker. While it is easy to understand poker as a game of deception (it has hidden information), it is difficult to spot deception possibilities in games of complete information.

It is the same with chess. I kept searching the net about whether bluffing exist in chess. This topic seems to be rarely discussed. Some people say there is bluffing in chess, some people say it doesn't. It is even more difficult to look for deception in go on the net.

So far, my hypothesis is that perhaps go is too complicated to analyse that even top players might not be able to notice eveything that is hapenning on the board. If that is the case, go is probably not a deceptive game like poker and stratego.

Thanks for the help.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Remember that you're playing your opponent, not the board position. Bluffing and intimidation are indeed part of the game. Am I going for this part of the board territory? Maybe. etc
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
フィル
Australia
Ashfield
NSW
flag msg tools
designer
badge
I am the wasp / that burrows in! I am the shriek / of twilight din!
Avatar
mbmbmb
A ko threat in go might be a bluff or might be a legitimate threat.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew
Japan
Tokyo
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Overplays and trick plays arguably have a psychological component.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Dyer
United States
Playa Del Rey
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Some players make moves they know are not the best, believing
that their opponent will not make the correct response.

Some consider this as poor style - that you should always play
as if you opponent is your equal. Others consider this as just
knowing and exploiting your opponent's weaknesses. There's
definitely a gray area in there somewhere.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeffrey Nolin
Japan
Nakamachi, Hiroshima
Hiroshima-ken
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Deception can take many forms. It is said that you should look on the opposite side of the board whenever a stone is played. Is the threat here where the stone is played? Or is the important area across from it? The sharper mind will usually deceive the one less perceptive.

If you're not sure of the best next move for you, playing like you do will certainly give your opponent pause.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martins Livens
Latvia
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ddyer wrote:
Some players make moves they know are not the best, believing
that their opponent will not make the correct response.

Some consider this as poor style - that you should always play
as if you opponent is your equal. Others consider this as just
knowing and exploiting your opponent's weaknesses. There's
definitely a gray area in there somewhere.


Yes, yes. I know one guy who consider playing handicap go (as white of-course) mentioned "poor style". Meanwhile I would consider refusing to either play or give handicap to weaker player poor sportsmanship.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
whac3 wrote:
Remember that you're playing your opponent, not the board position. Bluffing and intimidation are indeed part of the game. Am I going for this part of the board territory? Maybe. etc

sbszine wrote:
A ko threat in go might be a bluff or might be a legitimate threat.


I tend to agree with the advice I often hear from strong players, that trying to "trick" one's opponent is (at best) only appropriate when you are clearly losing and have to try something wacky to shake things up and (at worst) a way to keep yourself from improving because you reinforce a bad habit of knowingly making moves which a competent opponent will punish.

That said, "playing your opponent" has more elements to it than just deception and bluffing, though. E.g. if you know that your opponent has much better joseki knowledge than you, then it could make sense to avoid playing standard openings: not in an attempt to trick them, but simply to avoid creating situations where you know they are stronger than you. Similarly if you know that your opponent's tactical fighting and tesuji skills are weaker than yours, then it could make sense to intentionally create complicated situations. Etc. But the intent is not to do "trick moves" or bluff; you could even directly inform your opponent "I know your joseki is better than mine, so I'm intentionally doing some nonstandard opening moves" or "I'm happy to make a complicated situation because my tactical skills are stronger", and you wouldn't be hurting yourself, unlike if you were trying to deceive/bluff/trick your opponent and told your opponent you were bluffing.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm not talking about "tricking" the opponent but responding to the opponent. Some opponents need a more aggressive posture in play for example. Regardless, every player has his or he own style of play. Given virtually any board position apart from the very end game, what a given player will do depends on the player's style of play. I'm not talking about sub-optimal moves but choice among equally optimal moves. Knowing if your opponent for example tends to go for new territory rather than undermining territory you've staked out has tactical advantages when deciding among equally good options.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
whac3 wrote:
I'm not talking about "tricking" the opponent but responding to the opponent.

Sorry, you used the word "bluffing", so I took you at your word. I'm not sure what kind of "bluffing" exists which doesn't involve trickery, or what you might mean by "bluffing" which doesn't involve trickery.

Doesn't bluffing by definition mean you are trying to mislead / trick someone?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
russ wrote:
whac3 wrote:
I'm not talking about "tricking" the opponent but responding to the opponent.

Sorry, you used the word "bluffing", so I took you at your word. I'm not sure what kind of "bluffing" exists which doesn't involve trickery, or what you might mean by "bluffing" which doesn't involve trickery.

Doesn't bluffing by definition mean you are trying to mislead / trick someone?

Buffing, at least as I understand the word, can mean deception or lying but it can also mean outguessing or intimidating in the sense of messing with the other person's head. "He bluffed you" might be said to someone who backed off a fight he might have won for example.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
whac3 wrote:
Buffing, at least as I understand the word, can mean deception or lying but it can also mean outguessing or intimidating in the sense of messing with the other person's head. "He bluffed you" might be said to someone who backed off a fight he might have won for example.

I guess this is a language tangent, but hey, we do that sometimes.

I don't recall ever seeing "bluffing" used to mean "outguessing" (are you maybe thinking of "calling someone's bluff", i.e. someone else is trying to bluff you and you outguess them, i.e. figure out that they are merely bluffing?) (Can you give an example?)

"Intimidating in the sense of messing with the other person's head" sounds like intimidating by tricking them. Messing with someone's head seems to me by definition to be to deceive them so that they mis-reason, be confused, think incorrectly, etc. (E.g. stage magic typically works by messing with the spectator's heads.)

FWIW:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bluff
verb (used with object)
1.
to mislead by a display of strength, self-confidence, or the like: He bluffed me into believing that he was a doctor.
2.
to gain by bluffing: He bluffed his way into the job.
3.
Poker. to deceive by a show of confidence in the strength of one's cards.
verb (used without object)
4.
to mislead someone by presenting a bold, strong, or self-confident front: That open face makes it impossible for him to bluff.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bluff
1
a : to deter or frighten by pretense or a mere show of strength
b : deceive
c : feign
2
: to deceive (an opponent) in cards by a bold bet on an inferior hand
intransitive verb
: to bluff someone : act deceptively
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Russ;

Okay, we'll have to amend my initial statement in this thread to begin with "I don't know about bluffing per se, but..."
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Colin Sham
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
That's exactly what a Cylon would say!
badge
All is dust...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
whac3 wrote:
Remember that you're playing your opponent, not the board position. Bluffing and intimidation are indeed part of the game. Am I going for this part of the board territory? Maybe. etc


This.

The board position might be complete information. Your strategy and intentions are not. Every play can be a bluff or deception of some kind. A defensive play may turn out to be an prelude to an attack (easily accomplished through creating thickness to crush your opponent against), or an offensive play that looks like a mistake, but instead forces your opponent into over-concentration and poor shape.

Your internet searches may not return anything on 'deception' and 'bluffing', but that's likely because the words aren't anything special.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There are many, many instances of bluffing in chess that failed.

We call them "blunders".

It's difficult to bluff in abstract games because there is generally no hidden information. If anyone tells you different, they are, well, bluffing!

ninja

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Chess has a long history of gamesmanship.

A very simple method would be to suddenly appear to relax or stiffen up, as a attempt to put your opponent on the defense or offense, respectively; the idea being to make them think you see something they're missing.

Though shameless and utterly dishonest, a simple declaration that "this is my first game" or "go easy on me, I'm a noob" is not against the rules of any game I'm aware of.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
D Beau wrote:
Chess has a long history of gamesmanship.

A very simple method would be to suddenly appear to relax or stiffen up, as a attempt to put your opponent on the defense or offense, respectively; the idea being to make them think you see something they're missing.

Though shameless and utterly dishonest, a simple declaration that "this is my first game" or "go easy on me, I'm a noob" is not against the rules of any game I'm aware of.


None of that occurs in actual tournament chess. I've yet to see somebody "fold" in chess due to a bluff or become unnerved. Chess players famously hang on to the bitter end.

Your example assumes I actually give a shit about your mannerisms. Walk through any Chess, Backgammon or Go tournament hall. you'll see players concentrating on the board and not on their opponents. This is not Hold'em Poker where mannerisms and idiocyncrasies of the player matter and can reveal some of the hidden information inadvertently.

Simply put, if you are worried about your opponents pre-game comments and mannerisms, you've probably already lost.

Go play Poker.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
2097 wrote:
When playing as black, I’ve noticed that white often tries to flim-flam me, making “scary moves” that are great if I back off but that don’t hold up if I prod at it a bit more severely.
I always use the verb “flim-flam” for this… though it might be called a bluff, I think it’s an attempt at deception.


I think "feint" is the word you are looking for.

If you "bluff" (flim-flam!) at, say poker, and get called, you LOSE.
If you "feint" at a wargame (Go and Chess are 2 examples) and ignore it, the results usually are not game-changing or loss-inducing. The threat was never real. A "feint" is easily countered but tries to elicit an overreaction by the defender to put his pieces out of position. Having the nerve to ignore a "feint" is a difficult quality to develop in wargaming. It's actually leads to a powerful axiom in chess:

"try to ignore your opponents threats".

I'm sure it is the same with Go. A healthy respect is earned towards good Chess and Go players.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
markgravitygood wrote:
D Beau wrote:
Chess has a long history of gamesmanship.

A very simple method would be to suddenly appear to relax or stiffen up, as a attempt to put your opponent on the defense or offense, respectively; the idea being to make them think you see something they're missing.

Though shameless and utterly dishonest, a simple declaration that "this is my first game" or "go easy on me, I'm a noob" is not against the rules of any game I'm aware of.


None of that occurs in actual tournament chess. I've yet to see somebody "fold" in chess due to a bluff or become unnerved. Chess players famously hang on to the bitter end.

Your example assumes I actually give a shit about your mannerisms. Walk through any Chess, Backgammon or Go tournament hall. you'll see players concentrating on the board and not on their opponents. This is not Hold'em Poker where mannerisms and idiocyncrasies of the player matter and can reveal some of the hidden information inadvertently.

Simply put, if you are worried about your opponents pre-game comments and mannerisms, you've probably already lost.

Go play Poker.



Those weren't intended to make an opponent fold or become unnerved. They're just subtle misdirections (e.g. my opponent is suddenly tense, perhaps I have an attack I'm overlooking). Maybe he'll run down the clock a bit more than he would otherwise. More likely, your efforts will go unnoticed. Probably works every once in a while though. I can't say I've ever used either technique, though I've employed gamesmanship very overtly in games against close friends (often under the pretext of combating unseen mosquitoes).

Certainly, saying it's your first game at a tournament wouldn't have the desired effect.

Must say though, if you're not paying any attention to your opponent, I think you're doing it wrong. You could stay home and play anonymous strangers online and have the same experience. But if I can get an opponent to start doing the nervous leg shake, or watch as their brows slowly furrow into a full-blown scowl, it makes it all worth it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
devil
D Beau wrote:
markgravitygood wrote:
D Beau wrote:
Chess has a long history of gamesmanship.

A very simple method would be to suddenly appear to relax or stiffen up, as a attempt to put your opponent on the defense or offense, respectively; the idea being to make them think you see something they're missing.

Though shameless and utterly dishonest, a simple declaration that "this is my first game" or "go easy on me, I'm a noob" is not against the rules of any game I'm aware of.


None of that occurs in actual tournament chess. I've yet to see somebody "fold" in chess due to a bluff or become unnerved. Chess players famously hang on to the bitter end.

Your example assumes I actually give a shit about your mannerisms. Walk through any Chess, Backgammon or Go tournament hall. you'll see players concentrating on the board and not on their opponents. This is not Hold'em Poker where mannerisms and idiocyncrasies of the player matter and can reveal some of the hidden information inadvertently.

Simply put, if you are worried about your opponents pre-game comments and mannerisms, you've probably already lost.

Go play Poker.



Those weren't intended to make an opponent fold or become unnerved. They're just subtle misdirections (e.g. my opponent is suddenly tense, perhaps I have an attack I'm overlooking). Maybe he'll run down the clock a bit more than he would otherwise. More likely, your efforts will go unnoticed. Probably works every once in a while though. I can't say I've ever used either technique, though I've employed gamesmanship very overtly in games against close friends (often under the pretext of combating unseen mosquitoes).

Certainly, saying it's your first game at a tournament wouldn't have the desired effect.

Must say though, if you're not paying any attention to your opponent, I think you're doing it wrong.


Disagree. If you're not paying any attention to your opponent in a F2F game then you cannot be misdirected by his gamesmanship. It's actually a good trait to have and all good tournament/club chess players are able to "tune out" the environment and know that what happens on the board is the *only* thing that matters. Sure, some can be affected, but that is on them, not you.
D Beau wrote:


You could stay home and play anonymous strangers online and have the same experience.


You could. you also could engage in self-gratification instead of dating. Yet, *most* people choose not to. There is nothing like the smell of a chess tournament hall. Good? Bad? That's up to you...
D Beau wrote:


But if I can get an opponent to start doing the nervous leg shake, or watch as their brows slowly furrow into a full-blown scowl, it makes it all worth it.


Well, I think you are living in unexperienced hypotheticals. I have my doubts that you've ever stepped foot into a live hall during a chess tournament or even played in one.

Any reactions like you just mentioned from your opponent have more to do with their personal idiocycrasies, nerves, board position, or a tender young age and inexperience than any gamesmanship on your part.

I don't doubt it happens, but it's not something you can control or should feel responsible for causing due to your 'gamesmanship', for sure, or take any credit for.

If you are thinking you can 'game' yourself to wins, that is delusional, and will fail 100% of the time. I've never seen it happen, ever.

A good bluff in Poker is far different because you directly influence his decisions based on your demeanor because he simply does not have all the information he needs, so he is trying to 'read' you for it. that is the essence of bluffing and gamesmanship.

The board does not lie in Chess, Go, or any perfect information Abstract with no luck component. The answer is in front of you. All you need to do is find it.

It would be an interesting experiment, on your part, however. I have my doubts, obviously.

Like I said: Chess players famously hang on to the bitter end. If you are being intimidated or being 'gamed' by your opponent with non-board trivialities, or even suspect you can intimidate another player using such actions, you are misdirecting your energies. How about just get better at the game?



2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Agreed. Overplay is a better description when pertaining to Go.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
markgravitygood wrote:
devil
D Beau wrote:
markgravitygood wrote:
D Beau wrote:
Chess has a long history of gamesmanship.

A very simple method would be to suddenly appear to relax or stiffen up, as a attempt to put your opponent on the defense or offense, respectively; the idea being to make them think you see something they're missing.

Though shameless and utterly dishonest, a simple declaration that "this is my first game" or "go easy on me, I'm a noob" is not against the rules of any game I'm aware of.


None of that occurs in actual tournament chess. I've yet to see somebody "fold" in chess due to a bluff or become unnerved. Chess players famously hang on to the bitter end.

Your example assumes I actually give a shit about your mannerisms. Walk through any Chess, Backgammon or Go tournament hall. you'll see players concentrating on the board and not on their opponents. This is not Hold'em Poker where mannerisms and idiocyncrasies of the player matter and can reveal some of the hidden information inadvertently.

Simply put, if you are worried about your opponents pre-game comments and mannerisms, you've probably already lost.

Go play Poker.



Those weren't intended to make an opponent fold or become unnerved. They're just subtle misdirections (e.g. my opponent is suddenly tense, perhaps I have an attack I'm overlooking). Maybe he'll run down the clock a bit more than he would otherwise. More likely, your efforts will go unnoticed. Probably works every once in a while though. I can't say I've ever used either technique, though I've employed gamesmanship very overtly in games against close friends (often under the pretext of combating unseen mosquitoes).

Certainly, saying it's your first game at a tournament wouldn't have the desired effect.

Must say though, if you're not paying any attention to your opponent, I think you're doing it wrong.


Disagree. If you're not paying any attention to your opponent in a F2F game then you cannot be misdirected by his gamesmanship. It's actually a good trait to have and all good tournament/club chess players are able to "tune out" the environment and know that what happens on the board is the *only* thing that matters. Sure, some can be affected, but that is on them, not you.
D Beau wrote:


You could stay home and play anonymous strangers online and have the same experience.


You could. you also could engage in self-gratification instead of dating. Yet, *most* people choose not to. There is nothing like the smell of a chess tournament hall. Good? Bad? That's up to you...
D Beau wrote:


But if I can get an opponent to start doing the nervous leg shake, or watch as their brows slowly furrow into a full-blown scowl, it makes it all worth it.


Well, I think you are living in unexperienced hypotheticals. I have my doubts that you've ever stepped foot into a live hall during a chess tournament or even played in one.

Any reactions like you just mentioned from your opponent have more to do with their personal idiocycrasies, nerves, board position, or a tender young age and inexperience than any gamesmanship on your part.

I don't doubt it happens, but it's not something you can control or should feel responsible for causing due to your 'gamesmanship', for sure, or take any credit for.

If you are thinking you can 'game' yourself to wins, that is delusional, and will fail 100% of the time. I've never seen it happen, ever.

A good bluff in Poker is far different because you directly influence his decisions based on your demeanor because he simply does not have all the information he needs, so he is trying to 'read' you for it. that is the essence of bluffing and gamesmanship.

The board does not lie in Chess, Go, or any perfect information Abstract with no luck component. The answer is in front of you. All you need to do is find it.

It would be an interesting experiment, on your part, however. I have my doubts, obviously.

Like I said: Chess players famously hang on to the bitter end. If you are being intimidated or being 'gamed' by your opponent with non-board trivialities, or even suspect you can intimidate another player using such actions, you are misdirecting your energies. How about just get better at the game?


I feel like you're finding arguments where there are none.

Gamesmanship exist! That's all I'm trying to say, and that's all that's truly relevant to the topic at hand. A few minutes of googling can produce a number of examples, some fairly amusing, none terribly effective. Certainly, they're no replacement for sound play, and their utility in general is dubious at best. I'm not advocating for anyone to adopt them, merely pointing out the concept as it pertains to the topic.

On the last bit, you're absolutely correct in your assertion that I've never set foot in a tournament. I'm generally an online correspondence player, though I try to get a few OTB games in when I can. I wasn't trying to imply that the foot-shaking/brow-furrowing was due to gamesmanship techniques, but rather the normal sorts of reactions people sometimes have when they're struggling in a game. If you don't take a certain amount of delight in observing such things, again, I fail to see the point in playing OTB. You're certainly not in it for the "smell," you cheeky bastard.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have a mother, and she married my father. I am not a bastard!



Well, I misread then when you said "...it would be all worth it" thinking you meant you actually tried such 'cheeky' methods of 'gamesmanship' and they met with some success. Tone misread, My bad.

I'm not denying such attempts exist. They are just less effective, however, than pissing on a forest fire, mostly ignored, and foolish if you ask me. But, You're not asking then, are you?

As for smells: For me. If it smells like chess, it must be chess. Or a BGG meetup. Take your choice.

gulp

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Anonymous
United States
Maryland
flag msg tools
Ridel wrote:
whac3 wrote:
Remember that you're playing your opponent, not the board position. Bluffing and intimidation are indeed part of the game. Am I going for this part of the board territory? Maybe. etc


This.

The board position might be complete information. Your strategy and intentions are not. Every play can be a bluff or deception of some kind. A defensive play may turn out to be an prelude to an attack (easily accomplished through creating thickness to crush your opponent against), or an offensive play that looks like a mistake, but instead forces your opponent into over-concentration and poor shape.

Your internet searches may not return anything on 'deception' and 'bluffing', but that's likely because the words aren't anything special.


I think you have the answer to the original poster's question. In go deception doesn't necessarily mean bluffing as much as it means masking your true intentions. Heck, if any game truly was perfect information, and you knew how your opponent was going to play, then the games probably would not be much fun.

--
Bill
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.