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Sergeants Miniatures Game: Day of Days» Forums » General

Subject: Flocking Bases rss

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Mayor Jim
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I know Damen (and others) have flocked their soldier bases. Any chance you folks could provide a step by step on how you did this...for the all thumbs folks like me? Thanks in advance...
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Chris Ganshaw
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Elmers glue and flock, it can be that easy. I am always keeping my eye out for small twigs or pieces of branch to use, even small pebbles. I have also used some little tuft grass from Games Workshop. I all depends on how far you want to take it.
I am not particularly "crafty". So to keep it very simple, some Elmers, spread it around with a toothpick, then dip it in the flock and let it set over night.
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Charlie Theel
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Besides bits of dirt/twigs from outside there's primarily two things used to base miniatures.

The first is Static Grass which is available from a number of places. Games Workshop sells a popular kind which has a blend of covers that looks natural and pretty good for almost any terrain. Typically you don't cover the entire miniature base in static grass, just a portion.

Here's some 15mm sci-fi figures I painted/based that shows Noch static grass (which is a cheaper alternative to the GW Static Grass and looks identical):



Another item most people use is usually called "Turf" on the product but is commonly called flock. Turf is typically clumpier and is small pieces of colored turf.
Here's a pic of turf being used I found on the net:


Lastly you can get Silfor Tufts (sometimes just called Tufts) - these are most commonly available from Army Painter. I used some brown ones on these Anglo-Saxons (I've since replaced them with green ones and also repainted the edges of the bases black as I didn't like the look of these at first):


Another good item to use is Kitty litter. The pieces are different sizes (looks more natural) and putting a couple pieces together really breaks up the monotony of a base. I'm not sure though how big the pieces would look next to a 20mm miniature as I typically use it with 28mm.

I haven't added flock/basing material to my SMG figures and don't plan to (prefer the clean look since the dog tag has to be seen anyway) so I can't really give you any tips there.

Also, keep in mind that if desert or snow terrain is ever released your Germans will not be as transferable to those terrain tiles aesthetically. This may not be a big deal to you but something like that would annoy my OCD tendencies on my own figs.
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Carl Marl
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I thin the white glue with water and apply it on with an old paint brush. Thin the glue until it has a consistency you can paint on. When you're done, you can clean the brush with water. It won't be good for painting anymore, but usable for applying glue in the future.
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Mayor Jim
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charlest wrote:
Besides bits of dirt/twigs from outside there's primarily two things used to base miniatures.

The first is Static Grass which is available from a number of places. Games Workshop sells a popular kind which has a blend of covers that looks natural and pretty good for almost any terrain. Typically you don't cover the entire miniature base in static grass, just a portion.

Here's some 15mm sci-fi figures I painted/based that shows Noch static grass (which is a cheaper alternative to the GW Static Grass and looks identical)...

Another item most people use is usually called "Turf" on the product but is commonly called flock. Turf is typically clumpier and is small pieces ...

Lastly you can get Silfor Tufts (sometimes just called Tufts) - these are most commonly available from Army Painter. I used some brown ones on these Anglo-Saxons (I've since replaced them with green ones and also repainted the edges of the bases black as I didn't like the look of these at first)...

Another good item to use is Kitty litter. The pieces are different sizes (looks more natural) and putting a couple pieces together really breaks up the monotony of a base. I'm not sure though how big the pieces would look next to a 20mm miniature as I typically use it with 28mm.

I haven't added flock/basing material to my SMG figures and don't plan to (prefer the clean look since the dog tag has to be seen anyway) so I can't really give you any tips there.

Also, keep in mind that if desert or snow terrain is ever released your Germans will not be as transferable to those terrain tiles aesthetically. This may not be a big deal to you but something like that would annoy my OCD tendencies on my own figs.


Thanks for the pics (edited) and info...good point on desert or snow terrain too...
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Damen Parker
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Hi Jim

Here’s what I did to my guy’s bases.

Cover base in white glue
Dip in a mix of static grass and flock. My mix is about 80% flock, 20% static grass and is very well mixed.
Once dried tap the excess off the model and brush with a clean dry brush.
Apply small dabs of white glue where the first layer may be a bit thin or around the edge of the circular base to blend in and dip in the same mix of static grass and flock. This also gives a slight undulating affect to the ‘ground’.
Allow to dry and brush off the excess.
Use a black sharpie and black up the edge for a clean finish – guess you could do this first prior to flocking.

That is the basic version. I like to add detail though.
For long grass or corn I use grass from the Hornby model railway scenics range. This is coloured thread that is cut in to lengths of about 100mm. To make a clump of long grass take a handful of threads and tie a thread around them tightly. Apply a small amount of super glue to the knot and allow to dry. Cut the excess of the thread you used to tie the knot. Now cut the bushed through the super glue. This should give you two clumps of grass though often one falls apart. Cut the grasses to desired length and stick to the base with super glue.

To add modeling gravel just use super glue and dip, press lightly and once dry brush off loose rocks.

I use tree foliage from the hornby scenics range for bushes or scrub. Apply super glue to the base and press down. Don’t use your finger as the glue seeps through the bush and your finger will stick, I use the flat handle end of my tweezers. If you press hard the bush will be quite flat, if you press very lightly you can get quite bushy bushes if you know what I mean.

For other detail such as branches I use dried lichen and I also have various packs of small leaves that I also use from time to time and a bit of variance. All my stuff is bought and leftover from my modeling days.

Don’t be afraid to experiment.

I’ll look to add some photos when I get home.

Cheers
D.
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