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Subject: Does size matter? rss

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Jasper Birch
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I am not 100% sure if this topic should be in the designing forum, but since I would like to know for my own designing purposes, I'll ask here.

Does box size matter to you?

When I am standing in a game store, I find myself looking at the bigger boxes first before looking at smaller boxes, but then again, when I open a big box and I find hardly anything in the box, I am always very disappointed (unless the box has room for expansions). I like my boxes to be practical, but full. In my closet, I rather have a lot of smaller boxes than a bunch of big empty boxes.

But still, in a store I still look at big boxes...

Now I am finishing up a game design and I am trying to get my box as small as possible without getting all components messed up within the box, but maybe I should just increase the size of it some more just for sales.

What do you think? Does size matter?
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Alison Mandible
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A small box makes me suspect the price will be lower. If you've got a low price point, that might be a good unspoken way to advertise. I don't know if other people react the same way.
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Curt Carpenter
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People empirically seem to be willing to pay more for bigger boxes, but then complain about box size if it's bigger than what's necessary for the components. So it's a tradeoff. Bigger name designers/publishers seem to be able to get away with getting their games with more air in boxes on shelves than smaller guys, so ymmv. As a consumer, I would ask publishers to please make their boxes only as big as they need to be. But using standard box sizes is also appreciated.
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Robert Szalai
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For me, bigger boxes also suggest that the game is more complex and needs more time to learn and play. Of course i know it's not completely true, just have a look at chess and activity. Still, some pshy-trick makes me always think that way.
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Nate K
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It's not the size of the box, it's how you use it.



...




ANYWAY, as a gamer on a budget, I always appreciate small boxes. Not only do they tend to come with smaller price tags, but they are small enough that my wife doesn't raise an eyebrow at me when I come home with it tucked under my arm. Plus they're great for my limited storage space.

There are several games that I would love to have and could probably afford, but I've been putting them off because their boxes are annoyingly large.
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Einmal ist keinmal
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http://boardgamegeek.com/article/10955653#10955653
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Isaac Shalev
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I've spoken to retailers who say they push the publishers to put the games in bigger boxes, even if it's a lot of air-ware, b/c it's easier to sell those games, and because they display better. Your eye-level shelves aren't going to go to lotsa little-box games.
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Einmal ist keinmal
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ender7 wrote:
I've spoken to retailers who say they push the publishers to put the games in bigger boxes, even if it's a lot of air-ware, b/c it's easier to sell those games, and because they display better. Your eye-level shelves aren't going to go to lotsa little-box games.

I find this hard to believe with so much Internet shopping these days. That, and if true, then we are some lazy ass consumers.

I went to the grocery store today to buy some cereal. I wanted something healthier, but everything at eye level was Fruit Loops and Cap'n Crunch, so I just got that.
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Isaac Shalev
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Sadly, all those marketing techniques that we laugh at totally work on our lizard brain in the store. Can't argue with the data that shows it to be true.
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M. B.
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FredjeBono wrote:
I am not 100% sure if this topic should be in the designing forum, but since I would like to know for my own designing purposes, I'll ask here.

Does box size matter to you?

When I am standing in a game store, I find myself looking at the bigger boxes first before looking at smaller boxes, but then again, when I open a big box and I find hardly anything in the box, I am always very disappointed (unless the box has room for expansions). I like my boxes to be practical, but full. In my closet, I rather have a lot of smaller boxes than a bunch of big empty boxes.

But still, in a store I still look at big boxes...

Now I am finishing up a game design and I am trying to get my box as small as possible without getting all components messed up within the box, but maybe I should just increase the size of it some more just for sales.

What do you think? Does size matter?


Don't make the box overly disproportional to the size of the game. A little bigger is alright for viewing/storage purposes. If you want your game seen better, then just make the box more flat and wide rather than deep for a little extra visual kick, but still not way oversized.
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John "Omega" Williams
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Desiderata wrote:
ender7 wrote:
I've spoken to retailers who say they push the publishers to put the games in bigger boxes, even if it's a lot of air-ware, b/c it's easier to sell those games, and because they display better. Your eye-level shelves aren't going to go to lotsa little-box games.

I find this hard to believe with so much Internet shopping these days. That, and if true, then we are some lazy ass consumers.

I went to the grocery store today to buy some cereal. I wanted something healthier, but everything at eye level was Fruit Loops and Cap'n Crunch, so I just got that.
:p


Its true and been true for a long time. Some retailers used to snub booklet and micro games since they werent in a box.

Game desighers usually little suspect the goings on on the publisher side and the retailer factors. Retailers have been pushing harder and harder away from Collectible games too. Hence the gradual shift.
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Jake Staines
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ender7 wrote:
Sadly, all those marketing techniques that we laugh at totally work on our lizard brain in the store.


A lot of marketing techniques fail to work as soon as you understand them enough to recognise them every time they're tried on you* - the problem is more that most people don't understand them. More to the point, most people have no interest in understanding them.




(* easy example: you go to buy a car, and the salesman says "I'll just go and check with my manager and see if I can get you a better price" and disappears off around the corner to waste five minutes doing nothing before coming back and offering you a pre-agreed actual-sale-price which is lower than the headline one. If you know what they're doing ahead of time, the psychological effect of supposedly getting a nice discount is totally ruined.
Not so easy example: supermarkets are convinced that they can win customers by having large full bread shelves that smell fresh; they cook new loaves throughout the day and continually restock and then throw away hundreds of pounds worth of bread a week. When you see large overstocked bread shelves, try to remember "my shopping would be cheaper if those idiots didn't do that".)
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David Douglas
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Is it sad that I read this thread expecting hilariously useless BGG responses and was deeply saddened to find it to be helpful and productive?
 
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James Deignan
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grasa_total wrote:
A small box makes me suspect the price will be lower. If you've got a low price point, that might be a good unspoken way to advertise. I don't know if other people react the same way.


I like to play a game with the guys at my FLGS. When they get new stuff, I pick it up and heft it. Depending how heavy it is, I try to guess the price. Weight usually equates to cost. I tend to get pretty close unless there's a disproportionate number of lightweight miniatures in the box.
 
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Rue Sailmana
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At the moment I'm looking for complex games in small boxes which I could take with me on vacation. I tend to leave big boxes alone, unless someone I trust already convinced me of the wonders of the game.

But mostly I don't look at the box size, because I already know which game I want to buy for the gameplay after extensive research here and on youtube. Size doesn't matter in such cases
 
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Filip W.
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Not that much except for three points:

If I see a small box I look at it even if I've never heard of the game - chances are it will be cheap so I can buy-and-try.

If I see a large box that's light I suspect that it's full of air and I'm not likely to get the game.

Smaller boxes store better and I can bring more small box games with me to game night.
 
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Mike C
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I long for games that can be stored vertically, like the Avalon Hill bookcase size. Unfortunately, on many games it means all the bits will scatter.

And in the other discussion (linked to this one above), I entirely agree that it's great when the game boxes fit into one of a few standard sizes.

BeyondMonopoly wrote:

For me, it is not a "box too big" issue, but rather, I am reluctant to purchase non-standard size boxes. Hex-shaped boxes, Queen Games, etc. If i had my way games would come i 5 box sizes:
1. Small Card Game - Amigo double-deck Card Box (Tichu)
2. Medium Card Game - The Resistance
3. Small Board Game/Large Card Game (Carcassonne)
4. Medium Board Game - Ticket to Ride
5. Large Board Game - Power Grid

Changing the depth is OK with me (Hansa or Medina in the #5 box FREX, Castle Ravenloft or Cape Horn in the #4, etc.) but if we could just standardize on those 5, my shelves would look much better.

 
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Adam Trzonkowski
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I often assume that a bigger box means lots of components and "coolness." Of course that isn't always true but I have that thought sometimes.

I think about Hero Quest and how many figures are in there and that makes me happy on some level.

At the same time, after the purchase, I prefer the smallest box possible. I want it to be easy to carry and store.

Especially for card games that I want to play on the go. The smaller the better.
 
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