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Shadows over Camelot» Forums » Sessions

Subject: All eyes on Sir Kay and the Holy Grail! rss

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Bob McMurray
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As King Arthur surveyed his kingdom he couldn't ignore the signs any longer...Camelot was in danger! He would need his knights and he would need them now, working together, to stave off certain doom.

4 knights responded to King Arthur's summons. Complete trust, however, would be elusive amongst this round table.

Turn order:
King Arthur (Nancy)
Sir Gawain (Bob)
Sir Percival (Mike)
Sir Kay (Robert)
Sir Galahad (Emily)

It was indeed a loud and energetic "oath of knights" which was to be expected from such an assemblage of eager and able knights. Camelot was under threat from many foes and it was important to work together and especially important to get off to a good start. Sir Gawain, offered, after his oath to Camelot, that the Black Knight could never best him in tournament.

But, despite Gawain's public boasts of defeating the Black Knight at joust, King Arthur quickly jumped ahead of Sir Gawain and immediately headed for the Black Knight's quest. This raised quite a few eyebrows at Camelot and even over-"shadowed" (fore-"shadowing"? ) Sir Kay's hasty and wasteful use of The Lady of the Lake on his very FIRST turn!

Throughout, Arthur hesitated and sometimes stubbornly refused to trade cards with anyone - claiming that he didn't have anything of value to give. Hmmmm. Something, at least, seemed afoot in Camelot to Sirs Gawain and Galahad. They just weren't sure what.

Gawain stayed behind at Camelot figuring he could further outfit himself for the Lancelot quest instead; in the end a better use of his considerable talents. Meanwhile, Arthur left the Black Knight tournament quite early after seeing the actual size of the Black Knight's lance and lurched on over to the Grail quest where he rightly belonged. Sir Percival slipped into the Black Knight tournament as the Black Knight obviously began to wonder what was up with his age-old foes!

Gawain was ready to battle for Lancelot's armor and headed there for some action. Sir Galahad had matters well in hand against the Saxon's invasion from the sea with an added boost from Sir Percival with his Heroism card. After securing Lancelot's armor, Gawain felt he was ready for the ultimate quest and thus led a company of knights over to the Holy Grail quest including Galahad (flush from his victory over the Saxons) and Kay. Things were well in hand and just as Gawain was preparing to reach out and grab the elusive grail one last stroke of despair gripped his heart leaving him short. The fickle fates had intervened indeed and Sir Kay was left with the Grail within his grasp. The Grail was won but belonged to Kay. No one considered this to be anything out of the ordinary as the knights re-convened at Camelot.

Although the knights continued to prove victorious on the field of competition with the Black Knight, this time by Sir Percival, Excalibur was proving to be very elusive without a team of knights working as one to secure it. The dragon was of no interest to the assembled knights. It, and later the Black Knight, gleefully sullied Camelot's reputation with 3 black swords added to the round table. As the seige engines mounted, at the borders of Camelot, the Picts and Saxons were BOTH on the verge of victory. The all-important sword count stood at 8 white and 3 black. The knights were nearing their life point limits as Sir Gawain went off to battle the Black Knight one last time to secure Camelot's future with the remainder of the knights battling seige engines in the field before Camelot. Sir Galahad used his last life point to destroy the 11th seige engine.

IF there was an unrevealed traitor a loss to the Picts and/or Saxons would spell defeat (7-6 black that is), but, a victory over the Black Knight would dispel all evil around Camelot (9-3 white!). Sir Galahad's selfless gesture would certainly not go unrecognized by Sir Kay who was continually drawing card after card in preparation for seige engine battles. In fact, if Kay were to save Galahad, Kay surely must NOT be the traitor right? But, with only one sword space left no offer to Galahad of water from the grail would certainly expose Kay to Arthur who stood next to act. Successfully revealing the traitor would save Camelot also!

All eyes were on Kay....the grail was indeed offered to Galahad who now lives!!! But, what does this mean to Kay's loyalty? After all, he seemed to be delaying a bit at Camelot drawing excessive cards at just the wrong time.

Gawain was within two cards of vanquishing the Black Knight and Arthur, despite Kay's indifferent attitude towards action, hesitated to accuse Kay of treachery. Convinced of Kay's loyalty, Arthur added the 11th seige engine and then immediately smote it down! Things looked good for the knights. All Gawain had to do was play an Excalibur card, or even a Morgan for that matter, and victory would be at hand - as the knights could use their remaining life points to prevent any more progression of evil. With Lancelot's armor that couldn't be TOO difficult could it? But, alas, fate was unkind to the good knight and TWO Despairs awaited him which forced the addition of the 11th engine. If Gawain could act but once more, Camelot would be saved!!!

It was now Kay's turn. With the 11th seige engine before him, Kay's eyes grew wide and, with the swiftness of an unladen swallow, Kay thrust the 12th seige engine on to the fields of Camelot and Camelot fell to the traitor! Oh - concealing his true nature to the very end, even protecting himself by using the Holy Grail for good, at just the right time, Kay prevailed over a stunned assemblage of knights.

Well played Sir Kay.

 
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Daniel Edwards
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Sounds like arthur lost it for the loyal knights with generally flubbing around and not accusing kay. And why add a siege engine as an evil action only to fight it? Were the wars about to fail?

Alternatively, if everyone had enough life maybe gawain should have died rather than risk losing a card. Ending the turn with 11 siege engines is fairly dangerous when you think you have a traitor.
 
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Bob McMurray
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Precisely - the wars were both about to fail and taking a black card was too dangerous. The exit strategy was for Gawain to beat the Black Knight before anything else (really) bad happened.

You bring up an interesting point which I hadn't ever considered before. Since Gawain and Co. were so committed to their exit strategy, of Gawain beating the Black Knight in a timing race against the Picts and Saxons and whatever else, that Gawain (that's me) never, ever considered accusing Kay. That really makes me think now about the end game and who's responsibility it may be to reveal the traitor, and, the relative value of an accusation versus the value of progress towards a committed end game strategy.

Thanks for the post.
 
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