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ARTHUR REILLY
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Games Magazine had favorably reviewed Teleporters many months ago, when it first came out. After seeing a picture of the board and pieces, I was immediately intrigued by the game. When Games Magazine came out with their Games 100 List, at the end of 2005, they had picked Teleporters as the runner up Abstract Strategy game. At that point, I knew I had to buy it.

First, I want to get out of the way, some of the things not directly related to the game play itself.

Teleports does not come in a box. They ship it with a large cloth bag and smaller bag to store the board and pieces in.

I ordered the game online, directly from Kadon, the manufacturer. Although they had deducted payment from my account for the game, it took them a month and a half to actually ship it out.

The board is made up of 8x8 squares, just like a chess board. However, the board is absolutely beautiful. Both home rows which are located on either side of the board (where everything but the pawns go in chess) are red squares with a red circle inside and the same for the other side, but in blue. The other squares have etched patterns inside them, making the board visually stunning. The pieces, also in red and blue, leave a little more to be desired, as far as quality goes. Although the pieces are a nice size and weight and are make of wood, the color staining on them were uneven, Considering the beauty of the board, the way the pices were stained, was quite a surprise. I will say though, that it didn't detract from the playing of the game.

Once all the pieces are set-up, the game actually looks like something that was made in some future century. I'll admit, I've left my set displayed since getting it, just to admire it from time to time.

ON TO THE GAME.

Surprisingly, there are only two types of pieces in the game. Four Poles and four Ports are used for each side. (In Red & Blue). The Poles are cylinders standing on end. To imagine the Ports, just picture a hollow cube cut in half diagonally, which would create two Ports.

The goal of the game is as simple as it can get. The first person to get their 4 Poles to the opponent's starting row, wins.

Interestingly though, two Ports can form a square, creating a 3rd piece, known as a teleporter.

The Ports and Teleporters move any number of squares, in a vertically or horizontal direction, provided nothing blocks their path. The Poles can only move one or two squares, in either a vertical or horizontal direction, or both. In addition, they can move from one side of the board to the other, if their at the edge.

What makes the game interesting, is the fact that in certain situations, the Poles can teleport from one location to another.

The Poles can teleport as follows:

From one starting square to another.
From one goal square to another.
From a goal square, back to a starting square.
From a starting square to a Teleporter.
From a Teleporter to another Teleporter.

Other move possibilities are moving a Teleport into the same same as your opponent's, thus forming a Teleporter but in Red & Blue. In those cases, the port that originally was on the square, gets sent back to one of it's starting squares. If no starting square is available, the other piece gets sent back instead.

Poles can also be sent back to a starting square, by trapping them in a Teleporter of your own.

Lastly a Port that moves to a square that's occupied by any color Pole, also has to option of moving around the Poke in any of the four possible ways that it can be orientated. In addition a Port or Teleporter can also be re-orientated on it's square, without moving.

During a turn, each player can make up to four moves but never moving the same piece twice. That makes looking ahead a little more difficult than usual.

HOW DOES IT PLAY

This will be the hard part to describe. On first playing, it seems rather simple. Games are close and it seems like the player who moves first, has a clear advantage.

Upon further playing, it becomes apparent that there is more than meets the eye here. Blocking and trying to form blockades with your pieces, becomes crucial. Over all, the game takes on the feeling of playing end games in Chess.

I'll admit, that after playing at least a dozen games, I get the sense of that other tactics and strategies may open up.

So if your looking for a game to display, or if you enjoy playing Chess end games, this is a game you should definitely consider.

If you're getting it as a gift though, order it way in advance.
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Tor Iver Wilhelmsen
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Quote:
I ordered the game online, directly from Kadon, the manufacturer. Although they had deducted payment from my account for the game, it took them a month and a half to actually ship it out.


It could be one of those "we make it after you (and enough others) preorder" deals. A reasonable business method for a small publisher, as long as they are up fromt about it. Did you read the small print when you ordered?
 
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ARTHUR REILLY
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No, there wasn't any fine print. In fact, their Website had shown the game as available. I had even requested a delivery date, that was 2 weeks after the order was place. Kadon wrote back to say that they'd try their best. A month later, wondering where the game was, I was told basically that they had screwed up my order, which I then received 2 week later. I didn't want to include all that detail in my Teleporters Review, because I actually like Kadon for coming out with some interesting and well made games.
 
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