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Subject: Transparent Cards: (Dis)Advantages thereof rss

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Ben O'Steen
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One downside is the smell. No, seriously. Get a copy of Gloom and stick your nose in there! A powerful pong!
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George Kinney
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You might want to look at Hecatomb, it uses pentagonal clear cards, with abililties on panels around the outside, so at most four things can be visible at once.

While it might be tempting to think of stacking partially clear cards with the existing layout, why not re-arrange them and use iconography that's better suited to stacking? In that case, Gloom might be a better model. And imagine not only text and numbers, but color and shape as well to differentiate traits?

Just some thoughts.
 
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Scott Wheelock
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Woodstock
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David Malki drew this!
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benosteen wrote:
One downside is the smell. No, seriously. Get a copy of Gloom and stick your nose in there! A powerful pong!


I've read that Gloom can scratch up really bad after time? I don't know that for sure, mind you, but it would be a downside, if true.
 
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Clive Lovett
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Kamloops
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Look at Redakai - it is on sale just about everyone in Canada and uses primarily transparent cards.
 
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John "Omega" Williams
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Transparent cards have some drawbacks to counter the neetness.

One is, well. They are plastic and require a very different process to make.

Another is that getting the right plastics can be a hassle depending on where you are. This ties into the first.

Next is cost. There will be an up front fee creeping possibly to miniatures to handle the molds and the special printing processes depending on assembly.

Lastly is the wear factor. If the cards scuff too much they gradually lose the tranaparency, and the image.

And on a totally freak nature point. You have to watch out for binary effects. Certain plastics will melt on contact with certain rubbers. I've had pieces destroy themselves just for having a rubber band holding them. And I have a figure on the desk here thats fused solid due to binary reaction between the plastic and the "O" ring holding it together.
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Dominique DeMille
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We were just having a discussion about this on FB and I'll re-post my opinion from there. I find that Transparent cards can hurt design space more than they help. One thing they do is limit the frames you can use so that all the frames must be the same for all types of cards of else you can't have truly hidden information. the use of hidden information can be so much more useful than the ability to stack them so they can be seen through. Also there is a problem of distortion as you stack the cards. If you stack to many the bottom cards can become distorted. In a game Like Gloom the transparent card's aren't a problem because aside from the circles that indicate the gloom amounts all the frames are the same, but notice how little card real estate is being used. Effectively this limits the actual complexity also.

If they really fit the theme and you can address these issues then sure they could be good, but then you have the sensory problems the other people brought up. Another thing to think about is the annoyances of moving an entire stack of cards any time you have to manipulate the card stack. Most games with this kind of stacking system deal with it by not ever manipulating the stack, which also reduces design space as that closes off an an entire sensory type.

I think they the use of transparent cards in a board game could be useful as an indicator of modification but not for a TCG/CCG/LCG. For example maybe you have a bunch of modifier cards set aside and you place them on your card when you have earned them, but they aren't used for anything other than aesthetics
 
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John "Omega" Williams
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On the subject of cards with levels of status...

One idea I played around with was a card with a status wheel sandwitched between. and a window in the card to indicate current status. Will have to make use of it some day.

Simmilar would be a card with a sliding tab. I prefer the wheel though.

Another idea that probably wouldnt work in the long run is a card with flaps on it that cover certain elemets. Not very practical and this was discarded.

Then theres the jigsaw puzzle style of cards like in Racer Knights, where you assembled the cars data card based on the parts you were using. Also not very practical.

 
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John "Omega" Williams
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Couple of games use wheels of some sort.
Most notable are the click bases for WizKids games.
Privateer Press used a wheel in their trackers.

Probably a couple of others.

 
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