Wade Ashton
United States
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Perhaps someone out there understands why game publishers nowdays still limit the release of games only within the country (or continent) of origin?

It makes sense that publishers want to stick with smaller print runs to test a games' success before investing in large-scale production, but why limit even those print runs to language-specific versions and limited distribution? It seems if the initial print runs were a bit larger and distributed worldwide, publishers would get a much better idea of true demand (not to mention, capitalize on new release "buzz," while making more money with additional copies being sold worldwide).

It seems that there is worlwide demand for all types of boardgames (euro and "ameritrash"), so why not release muli-language editions simultaneously?

It's a shame to find out about a great game, only to find that you can't get a copy or, IF it becomes available, you have to wait 6 months to a year (or more) to get it.

As usual, I'm sure it comes down to economics, but can anyone in the industry help us understand?

 
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Jennifer Derrick
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It's definitely economics. A publisher does a small run to see how it does, like you said. Also, some publishers never do anything other than a small run. That's just their business model, sticking to small niche games. They may hope that a larger publisher picks up the rights to publish it in other countries, but that may or may not happen, or it may not even be offered for sale.

If it's language specific, that means that the publisher didn't have to pay a translator to take it out of the native language of the game designer. They also don't have to incur the expense (and risk) of printing multiple versions. Some games do very well in some countries but not in others due to cultural differences, etc. and a publisher has to take that into account.
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Wade Ashton
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Thanks for the response.

It will be interesting to see how (or IF) this changes with the demand of a growing hobby with an increasing worldwide gamer audience.
 
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Matt Riddle
United States
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HighVolumeLP wrote:
Thanks for the response.

It will be interesting to see how (or IF) this changes with the demand of a growing hobby with an increasing worldwide gamer audience.


It is changing. There apparently is already a lessening demand for "language" printings. Many Euro customers are willing to play an English or German version. Would most prefer to have a game in thier native language? Ofcourse, but by the time a game is popular and other language printings are added that were not printed from the beginning, many of the potential customers have had a chance to buy it in German or English from Amazon.
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'Bernard Wingrave'
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I'm guessing that shipping costs may also have something to do with it. It's hard enough to deal with shipping and tracking in your own country; when you ship across international borders, I hear it can be a nightmare.
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