GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!
7,912 Supporters
$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
21 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
38 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: Homesteaders vs Troyes? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Chris Wood
United States
Darien
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Which of these two great games do you prefer an why?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Redford
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I prefer Troyes by a little bit because it is more complex, but I own both and think they are both awesome.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ann Th.
Belgium
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Myoman wrote:
Which of these two great games do you prefer an why?


I'd pick Troyes for sure.

I've played Homesteaders once and didn't like it at all. It's a complete multiplayer solitair and no real interaction.

Troyes has much more interaction and an original use of dice.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moe45673
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
They are very, very different. The biggest difference may be that Homesteaders is a tableau builder whereas Troyes is all played on a single board. Both games are well balanced and have multiple paths to victory with tons of replayability.

I'd say choose on one decision: Are you playing more with newbs/light gamers or more BGG-type regulars? Homesteaders would work with either. While Homesteaders is very deep and replayable, it's not obtuse. Troyes is really only rewarding as a game that slowly reveals its many layers.

I haven't played enough of either, but I'd think Troyes is the better game if you ahd to make me choose, but again, it's like asking if I prefer Mac N Cheese or a Hamburger.... I love both and they both have their place.

I disagree with the comment above about Homesteaders being mp solitaire. It's an auction game and there is a ton of skill in auctioning well.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Lane
United States
Golden Valley
Minnesota
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I agree, these are VERY different games.

IMO Troyes wins because it's not like other games I have personally played. I didn't LOVE it, but I thought it was meaty and allowed for some really tough choices. Homesteaders is well loved by many, but I felt it was one of those games that just rehashed ideas from other games. I wouldn't feel the need to own it if I owned something that scratched the similar itch in a better way.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
nyn -
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This looks like you pulled two random games out of a hat and then asked "which should I go with?". I'd say neither. Reach back into the hat and pick a few more options. While you're at it, why not list out some criteria for what will drive your decision? Do you want a heavy Euro? Do you want an accessible game for casual players? Do you want theme? Do you hate dice as much as I do?

Without that, this just seems like a silly question with no good answer.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ann Th.
Belgium
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Moe45673 wrote:
They are very, very different. The biggest difference may be that Homesteaders is a tableau builder whereas Troyes is all played on a single board. Both games are well balanced and have multiple paths to victory with tons of replayability.

I'd say choose on one decision: Are you playing more with newbs/light gamers or more BGG-type regulars? Homesteaders would work with either. While Homesteaders is very deep and replayable, it's not obtuse. Troyes is really only rewarding as a game that slowly reveals its many layers.

I haven't played enough of either, but I'd think Troyes is the better game if you ahd to make me choose, but again, it's like asking if I prefer Mac N Cheese or a Hamburger.... I love both and they both have their place.

I disagree with the comment above about Homesteaders being mp solitaire. It's an auction game and there is a ton of skill in auctioning well.


Like I said, I only played once and this was my initial feeling. And it didn't do it for our group, so I doubt this will hit the table again.
But in any case, it's always a personal thing.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Dunagan
United States
Clermont
GA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I own both.

I think Troyes is an amazing game. Feels very unique and has lots of paths to scoring victory points.

Homesteaders is fine. It's not bad, but it feels a little like a mash-up of Vegas Showdown with a bit of Le Havre/Puerto Rico..(insert game with lots of buildings to buy/build)

Overall, I don't see Homesteaders staying in my collection long term...hmm, I see a potential trade offer...I'll get back to you.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moe45673
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
Mouseketeer wrote:

Like I said, I only played once and this was my initial feeling. And it didn't do it for our group, so I doubt this will hit the table again.
But in any case, it's always a personal thing.


Naturally. I simply stated that it does not feel that way to me and, by virtue of the auction, there is player interaction.

I do agree with you that the conflict doesn't go much beyond someone taking a building you were really hoping to get. What I love about this game is that there are so many paths to victory that sometimes folks fight over the same auction to ridiculous prices because they're both eye-ing that one building, yet after someone wins the other person goes "Oh. That's the one you wanted. Take it, I wanted another one"
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Wood
United States
Darien
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
thenyn wrote:
This looks like you pulled two random games out of a hat and then asked "which should I go with?". I'd say neither. Reach back into the hat and pick a few more options. While you're at it, why not list out some criteria for what will drive your decision? Do you want a heavy Euro? Do you want an accessible game for casual players? Do you want theme? Do you hate dice as much as I do?

Without that, this just seems like a silly question with no good answer.


This is for a last order for CSI for free shipping. I'm looking for a euro with some depth and richness. Theme is not as important as it usually is for me, but I'm looking for choices, interaction, multiple routes for points, multiple aspects to gameplay, tightness and a good flow to gameplay (not having a mechanical system that seems fragile), a pleasure to look at with sturdy pieces, and a game that you want to play again right after it ends.

Dislikes: Agricola, Lost Cites, Tigris and Euphrates, Chicago Express, Kingsburg

Likes: Trajan, Le Havre, Ra, Tzolk'in, Carson City, Puerto Rico, Macao, Glen More, Arena Rome

Edit: I also do not want a game that if you play a couple things wrong tactically, you have less and less good choices the following rounds/ turns. Snowballing futility turns me off.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Dunagan
United States
Clermont
GA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Myoman wrote:

Likes: Trajan, Macao


Definitely Troyes then. It feels very Feld-ish. It's also pretty heavy, maybe not quite as Trajan, but more so than Macao.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
nyn -
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Myoman wrote:
thenyn wrote:
This looks like you pulled two random games out of a hat and then asked "which should I go with?". I'd say neither. Reach back into the hat and pick a few more options. While you're at it, why not list out some criteria for what will drive your decision? Do you want a heavy Euro? Do you want an accessible game for casual players? Do you want theme? Do you hate dice as much as I do?

Without that, this just seems like a silly question with no good answer.


This is for a last order for CSI for free shipping. I'm looking for a euro with some depth and richness. Theme is not as important as it usually is for me, but I'm looking for choices, interaction, multiple routes for points, multiple aspects to gameplay, tightness and a good flow to gameplay (not having a mechanical system that seems fragile), a pleasure to look at with sturdy pieces, and a game that you want to play again right after it ends.

Dislikes: Agricola, Lost Cites, Tigris and Euphrates, Chicago Express, Kingsburg

Likes: Trajan, Le Havre, Ra, Tzolk'in, Carson City, Puerto Rico, Macao, Glen More, Arena Rome

Edit: I also do not want a game that if you play a couple things wrong tactically, you have less and less good choices the following rounds/ turns. Snowballing futility turns me off.


Ok, that offers much more to work with. You may enjoy Troyes. Personally I find it lacks cohesion, but I know a few gamers who just love it. You hapen to enjoy some of my favorite games, so I might suggest a few more of my favorites: Ora et Labora, The Castles of Burgundy and Belfort might all be worth looking at.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
DigitalMan
United States
flag msg tools
designer
Fretboard Gamer
badge
p/g
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Myoman wrote:
Likes: Trajan, Le Havre, Ra, Tzolk'in, Carson City, Puerto Rico, Macao, Glen More, Arena Rome

Edit: I also do not want a game that if you play a couple things wrong tactically, you have less and less good choices the following rounds/ turns. Snowballing futility turns me off.


Snowballing futility sounds exactly like Trajan to me. If you get out of position/timing on your mancala, you could spend several actions trying to regroup. (Happened to me last night; my wife smoked me by around 50 points.) Trajan is a really good game, but if you get out of step, recovering is going to be crazy difficult.

All that being said, I think what you have is a coin flip. Both Troyes and Homesteaders are great. I can offer this:

1 = Homesteaders
2 = Troyes

d2 = (2) = 2
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
  • [+]
  • 275068. DigitalMan
  • d2 =
  • (2) =
  • 2
  • Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:55 pm
Shane Larsen
United States
Salt Lake City
UT
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Carthage wrote:
Myoman wrote:

Likes: Trajan, Macao


Definitely Troyes then. It feels very Feld-ish. It's also pretty heavy, maybe not quite as Trajan, but more so than Macao.


Yup. Based on those likes, go straight to Troyes.

I would say it's the hardest to grasp of those three. Trajan is actually a pretty easy game to comprehend, IMO, simply because pretty much every mechanic is borrowed from other games. It's like the greatest Euro mash-up ever made (runner-up to Dominant Species).

The mechanics in Troyes, on the other hand, are unique. This makes it harder for new players to catch on.

But yeah, Troyes seems like the way to go. FWIW, it's one of my very favorite games.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Buddha Meeple
Poland
Warsaw
flag msg tools
“It is a civilizational wake-up call. A powerful message—spoken in the language of fires, floods, droughts, and extinctions—telling us that we need an entirely new economic model and a new way of sharing this planet.” ― Naomi Klein
badge
“Climate change has never received the crisis treatment from our leaders, despite the fact that it carries the risk of destroying lives on a vastly greater scale than collapsed banks or collapsed buildings.” ― Naomi Klein
Avatar
mb
I have only played Homesteaders and loved it.


I will jump in and try to hijack the thread with another question - how does Troyes compare to Alien Frontiers? I enjoy dice in Macao and Castles of Burgundy but I didn't like Alien Frontiers - found it simple (in a wrong way) and flat. Is Troyes for me?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darryl with one "R"
United States
Redmond
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
godunow wrote:
I have only played Homesteaders and loved it.


I will jump in and try to hijack the thread with another question - how does Troyes compare to Alien Frontiers? I enjoy dice in Macao and Castles of Burgundy but I didn't like Alien Frontiers - found it simple (in a wrong way) and flat. Is Troyes for me?


I haven't played Alien Frontiers, mostly because it seems to me that there's too much 'bash the leader' for me to enjoy.

But I enjoy Burgundy quite a bit. I love Macao. And I love Troyes. So based on this sample of one person, I would recommend Troyes to you.

I didn't find Troyes to be simple at all. The first couple of times I played, the game felt so open that I wasn't really sure what I needed to do in order to get closer to winning. But after playing a couple more times, I began to enjoy it a lot.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kathleen Nugent
United States
Tamworth
New Hampshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Myoman wrote:

Likes: Trajan, Le Havre, Ra, Tzolk'in, Carson City, Puerto Rico, Macao, Glen More, Arena Rome



I like all the games you like. And of your two options, I much prefer Homesteaders to Troyes. It plays well with two (my usual number). There's lots of manipulation of resources to get the building you really want. Cleverness is needed.

Troyes is too random for me. And too dice controlled. Decision making is more in my hands with Homesteaders.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew
Japan
Tokyo
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Homesteaders is substantially lighter, shorter, and less fiddly than Troyes. Its market and debt mechanics allow you resource and auction flexibility.

Troyes has more interaction (kicking people out of buildings, using their dice, semi-cooperatively overcoming the obstacles) and more going on.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
nyn -
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
godunow wrote:

I will jump in and try to hijack the thread with another question - how does Troyes compare to Alien Frontiers? I enjoy dice in Macao and Castles of Burgundy but I didn't like Alien Frontiers - found it simple (in a wrong way) and flat. Is Troyes for me?



I think yes. I expect you will like Troyes. It's nothing like Alien Frontiers except in the use of dice as workers and in how the numbers rolled affects either the options available or the effect of the options used. Troyes is a much deeper game both in the available actions, how actions affect future actions (though chaining is very limited) and even in what dice can be used (you can purchase the dice rolled by other players). Troyes is also far more dynamic in that the actions available in each game are card driven and more powerful actions become available in later rounds while Alien Frontiers is entirely static.

That said, I actually enjoy playing Alien Frontiers more even though I typically prefer a much heavier game. I find Troyes to be a bit chaotic for my taste, the theme is invisible to me and the disparate parts feel like ... disparate parts. It's also extremely difficult to teach even after you know it well. This would be fine if it were a masterpiece like Brass, but, well... to each their own.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christopher Boat
United States
Ankeny
Iowa
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Based on the games you said you enjoyed, I would definitely recommend Troyes over Homesteaders. Both are excellent games, however, and you should try Homesteaders at some point.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
DigitalMan
United States
flag msg tools
designer
Fretboard Gamer
badge
p/g
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
godunow wrote:
I have only played Homesteaders and loved it.

I will jump in and try to hijack the thread with another question - how does Troyes compare to Alien Frontiers? I enjoy dice in Macao and Castles of Burgundy but I didn't like Alien Frontiers - found it simple (in a wrong way) and flat. Is Troyes for me?


Troyes definitely has more in common with Macao and Burgundy than it does with Alien Frontiers.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Drew Hicks
United States
Raleigh
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Homesteaders feels to me a lot like Puerto Rico with Amun-Re/Vegas Showdown auctions for buildings. I enjoy the game a lot, and it plays pretty fast. Anyone who has played one of the above three games could probably learn it quickly.

I am also a fan of Troyes, but it contains too many subgames and as such is simply not possible to teach before playing. Nobody understands how everything connects until halfway though the first game; I was taught by someone who has had no trouble explaining similarly heavy games, and couldn't think about all those subgames at once until my second game.
Additionally it typically takes much longer to play, and has a YAWNING CHASM OF AP into which you can fall due to the permutations of available dice, which is less present in Homesteaders.

Just some thoughts to take into account.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moe45673
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
Homesteaders is definitely easier to understand than Troyes for a Euro veteran (or even for a light gamer). The main question comes up: is Troyes an interesting gamespace to explore? I would answer yes, it is, and I'm not the patient type. Most negative reviews of Troyes don't seem to dispute this, rather, they take issue with other factors of the game.

The rulebook for Troyes is an easy read. You can play it on boardgamearena.com, I highly recommend doing so
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Wood
United States
Darien
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
What are the other factors, and are there any factors that your personally dont like?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moe45673
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
There is nothing I dislike with the game. I think it's extremely well made

The guy I bought it from said he thinks there's a first player advantage in a 4 player game (hence why he sold it). I put up a thread in the Troyes forums asking if this was true and got tarred, feathered, and placed in the stocks for even suggesting such an idea (they said no).

You can read through the comments on the game to see what folks don't like.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.