Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 Hide
14 Posts

Tjuv och polis» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A simple game that can be found in most Swedish homes rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Tjuv och Polis (Swedish for "Thief and Police") is a simple game for 2-6 players aged 6+. One player plays the police and the others play the thiefs.

Each thief player controls one thief and they start in one of the many hideouts. At the beginning of the game they are free to move as they want as long as they don't accidently rob a bank or a post office.

The police player controls a patrol car and one police officer per thief and an additional officer as well. A game with three players would therefor contain two thiefs, three police officers and the patrol car.

The game uses a dice to determine move. a roll of five mean that you can move five steps etc. The exception is the patrol cars that moves two steps for every pip on the dice. a roll of five can therefor be used to move ten steps with the car. The car is very usefull but it lacks a reverse gear which mean that it can be outmanouvered. The police player may only move one of his pawns during his turn.

To help the thief players there are trams travelling through the city which can be used to hasten their escape. The police officers can use the tram as well but they can't arrest a theif that is standing at a tram station.

The banks and post offices are spread out around the city with the more central ones containing more money the the smaller offices in the outer regions. The central bank office contains $20.000 and the smallest post office only got $2.000.

There are several hideouts spread around the other edges of the board making it easier for the thiefs to rob a bank when the police is occupied elsewhere. As soon as the thief steps into the bank he becomes a fugitive. A thief may rob several banks in a row but the risk of being caught increases for every turn that he runs around carrying all his loot. If the thief player manages to get back to one of the hideouts he gets too keep the money. He is the allowed to walk the streets as a free man again (untill he robes another bank). If the police player manages to capture the thief while he is carrying his loot then he'll get to keep $1.000 for every $5000 that the thief was carrying. An amount if $1-5000 would give the police $1000 and $5001-10.000 would give him $2.000 and so on. The police player is the only player that can't lose his money.

when the police captures a thief he lose all of his loot and is locked up for 1D6 turns. The thief may try to escape during this time by rolling a dice. On a roll of six he manages to escape and must hurry to a hideout before the police captures him again.

The game isn't played in a determined number of turns, instead it ends if the police manages to capture all thiefs at one time or when the thiefs flee by leaving the board, either by ship, train or plane. If the police captures all thiefs and have them locked up then he becomes the winner, no mather the amount of loot hidden it the hideouts. If one or more thiefs manages to leave the country with their loot, then it's the player with the largest amount of money that wins.

A thief trying to leave the country carries all his loot from all his previous robberies and he will become the main target for the police, making it easier for the other thiefs to get some more money. Once a thief has fled he is out of the game. The remaining players continue untill all thiefs have been arrested or fled the country.

5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J Boyes
United States
Unspecified
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This game sounds like a lot of fun!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It's not bad, but I don't think that it will work that well with the older gamers. I usually play it with my kid sister since it's a family game. She's a bad loser but as long as she gets aways with robbing a bank or two she don't mind if one of the other thiefs manages to steal more money.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kurt Mericle
United States
Rossford
Ohio
flag msg tools
It looks fun, and interesting. Where can I find a copy of the rules,and game contents?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The game can be found in most Toy stores in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. I haven't seen any english versions so the rules would need to be translated first, but since there's only about two pages of rules I think that it can be arranged.

It costs about €30/$35 in Swedish stores.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Magnus White
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mb
Can I just correct you the victory condition

The victory conditions are:
- All thieves have escaped from the town (the thief with the most money wins)
- All thieves are locked up (the PLAYER with the most money wins - either police or thief)

This does make it rather more difficult for the police to win. There are also a couple of other rules which are not very clear such as thief hideouts. No where can I find it saying that the player becomes a 'free man' once having entered one. Only that the loot can be hidden.

Perhaps I am looking too much into it but I think playing with slightly modified rules (such as ignoring the correct victory conditions) makes the game much more enjoyable and balanced.

As as previously stated by others, it's not for gamers, it should be played with family or younger players
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick McNamara
United States
Jupiter
Florida
flag msg tools
And avatars as well!
badge
Move along, folks, show's over....
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Is there anyone out there that might be interested in loading up an English translation of the rules? I just picked this up today at my local thrift store. Thank you!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I found the latest version of the Swedish rules at http://www.algaspel.se/~/media/Alga/Files/Rules/se/38010815_...

I'll see if I can find some time during next week to translate them, otherwise it will have to wait until then end of November.
1 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick McNamara
United States
Jupiter
Florida
flag msg tools
And avatars as well!
badge
Move along, folks, show's over....
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Karl,

You rock!!! A translation would be fantastic. Thank you so much!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I just uploaded a PDF with the translation, but it isn't visible for some reason. I guess that it must be approved by an admin first.

Send me a PM with your email address if the file doesn't appear within a few days and I'll mail it to.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sweden
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I haven't actually downloaded or (proof) read your translation, but I think you deserve a thumb for the effort alone.



Regarding differences between editions: Although there have been several changes to the text between older and newer (Swedish) editions, there are no more than two actual rule changes that I have been able to establish with certainty – plus a few new rules that seem merely to fill holes (where there was no rule at all to be found in the earlier texts).

The major actual rule change concerns arrest of a thief at a tram stop. This used to be entirely prohibited. Now it is allowed, except by encirclement.

Then there is a minor change to the setup of the radio car: According to earlier rules, it (like the policemen) starts within the police headquarters (polishuset = "the police house"), "right in front of the entrance" ("mitt för ingången"). Albeit a bit oddly worded, this must reasonably mean it is to be placed on the two central squares of the police HQ with its front on the gate square, i.e. pointing "south". (Note: Once the car moves, it can never again move inside the police HQ or any other building.) According more recent rules, the car is to start on the street outside the gate. It can be placed any which way on the street (the police player decides), as long as one of the two squares it covers is the square just outside the gate.

As for new rules merely filling seeming holes in the original text, there is one that simply clarifies who begins the game (the police player, and after that play proceeds clockwise around the table). More interestingly, the more recent rules also cover exactly what happens if a thief is thrown out of the game by being arrested 4 times: The thief piece and the policeman who arrested him the 4th time are then still both placed in the police HQ (like after a normal arrest), but after that neither of them takes any further part in the game. (So, essentially, one policeman and two squares within the police HQ exit the game along with the thief.) These may always have been the intended rules, but it's hard to know, of course.



Rule changes aside, there are a number of rules that aren't as clearly written as they could have been. So figuring out how a rule is really meant to be read can take some "detective work" at times. I have written about my recent experiences regarding tram rules elsewhere. I'd also like to comment on a few rules discussed here, and where I have landed regarding them.


Game end and victory conditions
Sardukar wrote:
The game isn't played in a determined number of turns, instead it ends if the police manages to capture all thiefs at one time or when the thiefs flee by leaving the board, either by ship, train or plane. If the police captures all thiefs and have them locked up then he becomes the winner, no mather the amount of loot hidden it the hideouts. If one or more thiefs manages to leave the country with their loot, then it's the player with the largest amount of money that wins.
magnuswhite wrote:
Can I just correct you the victory condition

The victory conditions are:
- All thieves have escaped from the town (the thief with the most money wins)
- All thieves are locked up (the PLAYER with the most money wins - either police or thief)
Well, according to the rules editions that I have seen, the winner is always the player with the most money, whether police or thief. There are no special cases to change that – neither if all thieves are locked up, nor if they all have escaped.

Some clarifications, though:

1. There are two ways a thief can exit the game. He can successfully flee the country (town), of course. But also: The 4th time a thief is arrested, he is out of the game! This important rule is very explicit in more recent rules (repeated twice even). However, in earlier rules it is mentioned only in passing (it is there too and very clear once you spot it): at the end of the section on thieves dens/hideouts. (It is stated there that all the money the thief had in any hideouts is in this case returned to "the bank".) If/when all thieves have left the game, either way, the game ends (of course).

2. Additionally, there's a sudden death condition occurring when every thief still in the game is behind bars. At least, this seems to be the most direct reading of the the game end condition (at the end of the rules).

3. When the game ends (according 1 or 2) the winner is – always and without exception – the player with the "most money". But what money? The police money is what it is, of course, and thieves who left the country have what they were able to take with them, nothing more. (The rules explicitly say any money such thieves left in hideouts is to be returned to "the bank".)

This leaves us with the thieves in prison: Unlike the successful escapers, they won't have any money on their person, obviously. The question is, do they get to count money not on the thief's person? (I.e. can these thieves, unlike those who escaped, count any money they took to hideouts but failed to take out of the country?) Answer: No! (Not the way we played, at least.) It's a very explicit no for the thieves who were arrested 4 times (see 1 above), and for thieves arrested 1, 2 or 3 times, I can't find any clear answer in the rules that differs. Intuitively, of course, it would make very little sense to grant one particular group of thieves such a huge advantage over any other. Plus it would, as far as I can see, turn escapes from the country more or less pointless – making for a very long and dull game. In brief, any thief who ends the game in prison will invariably have zero money!

At least that's how we interpreted the rules for our recent play. (So I think the OP's description is mostly, if perhaps not entirely, accurate.)


Arrest warrants and Thieves dens/hideouts
Sardukar wrote:
If the thief player manages to get back to one of the hideouts he gets too keep the money. He is the allowed to walk the streets as a free man again (untill he robes another bank).
...
On a roll of six he manages to escape and must hurry to a hideout before the police captures him again.
magnuswhite wrote:
There are also a couple of other rules which are not very clear such as thief hideouts. No where can I find it saying that the player becomes a 'free man' once having entered one. Only that the loot can be hidden.
Agreed. And I am pretty sure Sardukar in this case has it wrong. Earlier rules explicitly state that if a thief is arrested after having hidden his money, the police doesn't receive any gratuity. Making it 100% clear that a thief can be arrested after hiding what he stole (which is what makes common sense of course). The police just doesn't get any money for it.

In more recent editions, I can't find that rule (but neither can I find anything to contradict it). Instead, there's a list of circumstances, repeated twice, under which a thief is unable to move past a policeman and can be arrested – and there is only one thing mentioned to except the thief from those rules. Having visited a hideout isn't it (whether or not any money was unloaded there). Having served his time in prison is.

I understand a warrant for a thief's arrest to work as follows.
You can earn it in three ways:
• Rob a bank, post office or the travel agency.
• Grab previously stolen money from a hideout. (This not entirely clear in earlier rules, but explicit in the more recent ones.)
• Break out of prison.

Once you have it, there is one way – and one way only – to get rid of it:
• Get arrested and serve your full time in prison.

(It should be said, despite all this, Sardukar's interpretation of this rule seems to be remarkably common. On a public "family life" forum – all in Swedish – I just now found no less than two cases of people arguing with their spouses about it: One is a wife whose husband insists on it, another one is a husband whose wife does.)
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The review was written based on the rules as I remembered them at the time and there are a numbers of errors concerning the rules mentioned there. I don't think that they matter much, though, since it still covers the basics of the game and shouldn't be used as an errata.

The translation of the Swedish rules doesn't contain any of those errors.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sweden
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Sardukar, I hope you didn't take my post to be an attack on your review nor (even less) on your rules translation. My thumb was sincere. (And I now gave you one on your review as well, for good measure.) I am happy that you are writing and informing about the game. Not that I think I am myself in need of a review of this particular game, but I fully agree with you that a game review in general doesn't need to be devoid of errors to make a good and useful read, and I don't think there is anything wrong with this one.

The reasons I replied:

• Two rules issues were already raised by an earlier poster, and my post was primarily an answer to that. (Since nobody else had said a word in response to that post, more than two years ago, I just felt it was about time that somebody did.)

• Like that poster was saying, a number of Alga's rules are (a lot) less than 100% clear. In regards to these two, I think I have landed on the intended interpretations, and I wanted to share my findings and arguments. But they both could definitely have been made more clear than they are. (As confirmed, in the case of the "wanted status" or "arrest warrant", by the discussions elsewhere that I linked to.) And there are several more rules like that, or even less clear.

• Finally, and not least, my own recent experience of playing the game and struggling with – in particular – its tram rules (more on that struggle of mine here), put me in "rules discussion and clarification mode" regarding this game as a whole.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Karl Benisch
Sweden
Stockholm
Stockholm
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It's quite hard to be offended by a comment made about a review that I wrote almost seven years ago, and I assure you that none were taken

I actually think that it's hilarious that this review still receives comments after such a long time, but I guess that's because no one else has written one.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.