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Subject: Landslide rss

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jock norton
Australia
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Nick, Rohan, Hal and Jock played this for the first time this week.

Although we had the 2004 data, we used 1971 electoral college figures that come with the game as we have a fascination with the Nixon era and also it simply made for ease of use of the game board and components.

The game flowed freely to start, and everybody at some stage had a period in the lead. Auctions were tense, fun and challenging, with bluff, counter bluff and triple bluff.

New York came out early and was then subject to repeated open auctions. California stayed at the bottom of the East state pile. There were recriminations for being the target of an open auction, and politics cards were played with both undisguised malice and strategy. We enjoyed the slightly metaphysical element of the “Stop any action about to be performed” politics card. We wondered what would happen if two of these cards from the pack were played simultaneously.

Then the game started to drag somewhat. By a freak of die rolling, we rarely landed on a mid west state space, so we were left with a large pile there which took a long time to get through (the game ends when the last state is auctioned off). Generally we all chose to use the “fly anywhere” option to conduct open auctions or to flush out California.

Towards the latter stages Jock emerged from the pack and seized a lead in both EC votes and voting cards. The response of the other three was to unite and attempt to bring him down. They called open ballots on his big states, only for this to backfire, with him pulling out of the auction race at the last moment and one of them having to pay him for the state in a combination of voting cards and states to an equivalent or greater value.

At the end game Jock was well in command, and the play was tedious and felt interminable, with inconsequential die roll after die roll.

Then at the very end, there was a dramatic and vicious twist. Hal landed on the Midwest state space and put the final state of the game up for auction. Jock bid all his remaining vote cards on it but Rohan trumped that using all of his votes AND all his states, relegating himself to last in the game but delivering victory to Hal as part of a nasty “anyone but Jock” campaign strategy.

In the end then, this game, on the surface more a game than a simulation, turned out in fact to be something more of a genuine political simulation.

Jock, the score recorder, stormed off in disgust and did not record the exact final results.
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Ron K
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'80' maxlength='250'> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="15%" align="right"><b>Avatar OverText</b></td> <td width="85%"> <input type="text" name="overtext[avatar]" value="Train Game anyone?
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If I recall correctly (having bought this when it was in print and played it many a time while waiting for the returns to come in):

- A stop any action card CAN stop another stop any action card (the rules specifically define "Any action" to include the playing of another Politics card!).

- When a region runs out of state cards, you're supposed to pull a card from any other region (last sentence in the rules section for STATE spaces). This would prevent a late game stall when only one or two regions have states still in the trays.

- As for the kingmaker scenario you describe -- well, that's politics for ya; a true politician would have avoided creating any enemies during the game!
 
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jock norton
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We were musing on the philosophically thorny issue that if you say that a stop any action card stops the actual playing of the previous card then presumably the first card has not been played at all and hence can be retained by the first player.

This would free up the first player to play his card again without being stopped. The second player's card (having been played and not itself stopped) would no longer be available to stop the action.

So using a stop action card to stop a stop action card being played is
basically a waste of that (second) stop action card.

Or indeed the first player's card, not having actually been played as per the above, could then be played to stop the second player's card, which, having been stopped, would be retained, and could then be played to stop the first player's card.

And so on.

The conundrum is that the wording is that the card stops any action "before it occurs". So how can you play it? It is not so easy, given this wording, to read the effect of the card as if it reverses any action after it has occurred.

Thanks for the clarification re state cards.
 
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Frank McGirk
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Actually, the rules state that "Stop Any Action"..."is defines as all activity which results when a player lands on a space or PLAYS a Politics Card (my caps)."

Thus, the card has been played...only its action/consequence is stopped, not the actual playing/spending of the card...thus, the card wouldn't be retained by its player.

Just picked this game up and looking forward to playing it.
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