Johan Haglert
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Earlier when I read about trauma one thing which felt kinda wrong to me is how you risk execution from having picked on too much "bad" trauma so to speak. Simply because that mean you have tried to threat the others on the ship well and done your best and that's how they treat you? =P

I do understand it's meant to force you to decide whatever you want to have helpful allies or not and possibly not make them helpful to save yourself. But from a thematic standpoint that doesn't work at all for me.

However one thing which was even worse which I just came to think about is how you can throw someone in the brig just to reduce your own risks of being executed in the end , wtf? =P

"Oh I only throwed him in the brig to save myself from execution! Honest! .."

(In the case where the rule book say that you "discard" the trauma tokens from an executed character or an ally which you have interfered with that mean that you remove them from the game not that you mix them with the rest of the trauma tokens? (including if it was a disaster token on the ally.)?
 
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You get rid of your trauma tokens by interacting with the non-player characters on the ship(s). If you spend your time avoiding everyone instead, cooped up in some closet, you become suicidal, homicidal, and whatnot. I think it is very thematic.

We still rarely play with allies and crossroads. Mainly because it slows down the game. But the allies work great when you play with 3 or 4 players, because you can take advantage of some effects that you would otherwise spend actions / skill cards to pass certain Crises / Quorum cards to perform.

The allies also somewhat spread the power around. The president and Admiral lose part of their special roles in the game.
 
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Johan Haglert
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a1bert wrote:
You get rid of your trauma tokens by interacting with the non-player characters on the ship(s). If you spend your time avoiding everyone instead, cooped up in some closet, you become suicidal, homicidal, and whatnot. I think it is very thematic.

We still rarely play with allies and crossroads. Mainly because it slows down the game. But the allies work great when you play with 3 or 4 players, because you can take advantage of some effects that you would otherwise spend actions / skill cards to pass certain Crises / Quorum cards to perform.

The allies also somewhat spread the power around. The president and Admiral lose part of their special roles in the game.
Yeah I just think it's kinda weird how your crew decide to execute you because you have gone around trying to encurage them and have them play nice ..
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You may have understood the tokens slightly wrong, or am I misunderstanding your point?

You receive trauma tokens at the beginning of the game, when you start your turn in the brig or in sickbay, or during crossroads. The allies help you to get rid of the tokens. It is the other players or cylons that go after you at crossroads, and they have their own grudges and agendas against you.

 
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Adria D
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aliquis wrote:
(In the case where the rule book say that you "discard" the trauma tokens from an executed character or an ally which you have interfered with that mean that you remove them from the game not that you mix them with the rest of the trauma tokens? (including if it was a disaster token on the ally.)?

You never remove trauma tokens from the game. Discarded trauma tokens always go back into the trauma pool.


edit: from page 5 of the official FAQ:

Quote:
Q: Do trauma tokens go back into the pool of unused trauma tokens when they are discarded?
A: Yes.
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Gerry Smit
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I think the OP's point is that to divest yourself of dangerous trauma you end up making the ally work for the other team.

As a human I need to unload Antagonistic trauma, thus any new allies I place are more likely to be Antagonistic than Benevolent. That's bad for the personal well being of that ally, and bad for team human.

As a cylon I need to unload Benevolent trauma, thus any new allies I place the trauma for are more likely to be Benevolent. That's good for the well being of that ally, but bad for team cylon and often good for team human.

Now, since you can hold up to two of the "dangerous" trauma the above isn't absolute, but it's certainly a factor.
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Adria wrote:
aliquis wrote:
(In the case where the rule book say that you "discard" the trauma tokens from an executed character or an ally which you have interfered with that mean that you remove them from the game not that you mix them with the rest of the trauma tokens? (including if it was a disaster token on the ally.)?

You never remove trauma tokens from the game. Discarded trauma tokens always go back into the trauma pool.


edit: from page 5 of the official FAQ:

Quote:
Q: Do trauma tokens go back into the pool of unused trauma tokens when they are discarded?
A: Yes.
Ok. Even if you kill yourself / a cylon draw them and have to draw more trauma I suppose then

Went have an easier time reading the faq if it was printed.
 
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a1bert wrote:
You may have understood the tokens slightly wrong, or am I misunderstanding your point?

You receive trauma tokens at the beginning of the game, when you start your turn in the brig or in sickbay, or during crossroads. The allies help you to get rid of the tokens. It is the other players or cylons that go after you at crossroads, and they have their own grudges and agendas against you.

Yeah I can get rid of them to the allies but if I "encourage" them to be nice people and give us benefits (as in remove the good ones) then I will end up having the bad ones and hence be executed.

If I give away the bad ones to the allies then sure I'm fine but they will act badly to anyone encountering them.

I hope it wasn't the other way around =P
 
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Trauma doesn't seem unthematic to me. The show was filled with flawed characters who had their own desires, goals, hopes, dreams, and yes, demons. They were conflicted about their lives, their decisions, their actions, their futures, and some of the drama in the show was from a character acting in a way detrimental to the fleet as a whole to service their own ends.

So the trauma makes some sense to me, as it represents the mood of your character. If your character's mood is good you will largely not worry about it during the game, but if your character's mood is bad then you need to take actions to make your character's mood better, even if that action could come at a cost to someone else.

It imposes a bit of a role into the game, but it's thematic.
 
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aliquis wrote:
Earlier when I read about trauma one thing which felt kinda wrong to me is how you risk execution from having picked on too much "bad" trauma so to speak. Simply because that mean you have tried to threat the others on the ship well and done your best and that's how they treat you? =P

I do understand it's meant to force you to decide whatever you want to have helpful allies or not and possibly not make them helpful to save yourself. But from a thematic standpoint that doesn't work at all for me.

However one thing which was even worse which I just came to think about is how you can throw someone in the brig just to reduce your own risks of being executed in the end , wtf? =P

"Oh I only throwed him in the brig to save myself from execution! Honest! .."

(In the case where the rule book say that you "discard" the trauma tokens from an executed character or an ally which you have interfered with that mean that you remove them from the game not that you mix them with the rest of the trauma tokens? (including if it was a disaster token on the ally.)?
Not to lay excessive blame here, but could you use the word ELIMINATED instead of EXECUTED? The latter term has been used in both Pegasus and Exodus... Cain, Dee, Airlock, crisis cards, Cally, Crossroads cards, but the former seems to be a better descriptor since that's what it truly does.... puts you out of the game for good, and can only occur when playing with the IN option.


... that big of an odd request out of the way, I avoid IN whenever we want a simplier game, but not necessarily slower. While the journey is typically shorter in non-IN games, other factors like "traffic" and slower game pace utlimately play a major factor too.

I do enjoy how the IN can forces players to avoid certain locations, or deal out XOs in attempt to avoid visiting certain allies.

The "power trip" is another feature... it allows players who couldn't normally do things to do so, like a non-pilot to draw red, a non-tactical person to draw purple, non-president to play Qcards, destroy civvies, destroy cylon ships, adjust the jump prep track, manipulate centurions, adjust resources, etc.
 
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jsciv wrote:
Trauma doesn't seem unthematic to me. The show was filled with flawed characters who had their own desires, goals, hopes, dreams, and yes, demons. They were conflicted about their lives, their decisions, their actions, their futures, and some of the drama in the show was from a character acting in a way detrimental to the fleet as a whole to service their own ends.

So the trauma makes some sense to me, as it represents the mood of your character. If your character's mood is good you will largely not worry about it during the game, but if your character's mood is bad then you need to take actions to make your character's mood better, even if that action could come at a cost to someone else.

It imposes a bit of a role into the game, but it's thematic.
My only issue with it was not acting bad against others was that more easily had you executed
 
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aliquis wrote:
jsciv wrote:
Trauma doesn't seem unthematic to me. The show was filled with flawed characters who had their own desires, goals, hopes, dreams, and yes, demons. They were conflicted about their lives, their decisions, their actions, their futures, and some of the drama in the show was from a character acting in a way detrimental to the fleet as a whole to service their own ends.

So the trauma makes some sense to me, as it represents the mood of your character. If your character's mood is good you will largely not worry about it during the game, but if your character's mood is bad then you need to take actions to make your character's mood better, even if that action could come at a cost to someone else.

It imposes a bit of a role into the game, but it's thematic.
My only issue with it was not acting bad against others was that more easily had you executed


I just read ackmondual's post and upon rereading your post I am guessing that he's right and that you're actually talking about elimination rather than execution.

It's still thematic: if your character keeps its trauma pent up inside and doesn't do anything about it, it eats them up from the inside out and kills them. Characters don't start out on equal footing, but then everyone has different powers and card draws anyway, so it's just one more thing that makes your starting position unique. Makes sense to me.
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Look at Gaeta - bad things kept happening to him (antagonistic trauma piling up) until he ended up staging a desperate coup and getting executed...
 
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To use some other examples from the show (finale spoilers in there):

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Boomer thought she was a human in the first season (or first half of the game), her player received mostly red trauma, which she tried to get rid of by piling it onto Chief (Getting him to cover for her in the show), this later came back and bit Cally player in the ass when she went to the hanger deck and chief put her in sickbay. And ultimately ended in Boomer being “eliminated” in the finale.

Another is Baltar, who passed off his negatives by playing old prejudices against each other, hurting the fleet but getting him cleared of the treason charges.
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jsciv wrote:
aliquis wrote:
jsciv wrote:
Trauma doesn't seem unthematic to me. The show was filled with flawed characters who had their own desires, goals, hopes, dreams, and yes, demons. They were conflicted about their lives, their decisions, their actions, their futures, and some of the drama in the show was from a character acting in a way detrimental to the fleet as a whole to service their own ends.

So the trauma makes some sense to me, as it represents the mood of your character. If your character's mood is good you will largely not worry about it during the game, but if your character's mood is bad then you need to take actions to make your character's mood better, even if that action could come at a cost to someone else.

It imposes a bit of a role into the game, but it's thematic.
My only issue with it was not acting bad against others was that more easily had you executed


I just read ackmondual's post and upon rereading your post I am guessing that he's right and that you're actually talking about elimination rather than execution.

It's still thematic: if your character keeps its trauma pent up inside and doesn't do anything about it, it eats them up from the inside out and kills them. Characters don't start out on equal footing, but then everyone has different powers and card draws anyway, so it's just one more thing that makes your starting position unique. Makes sense to me.
Wasn't they killed by some trial? But yeah, maybe I used the wrong word. Or was the trial so harsh they committed suicide?

Maybe I'm wrong. I wish it was thematic I just felt it was a little weird though balanced choices and that matters more than making sense.
 
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vonpenguin wrote:
To use some other examples from the show (finale spoilers in there):

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Boomer thought she was a human in the first season (or first half of the game), her player received mostly red trauma, which she tried to get rid of by piling it onto Chief (Getting him to cover for her in the show), this later came back and bit Cally player in the ass when she went to the hanger deck and chief put her in sickbay. And ultimately ended in Boomer being “eliminated” in the finale.

Another is Baltar, who passed off his negatives by playing old prejudices against each other, hurting the fleet but getting him cleared of the treason charges.
Sadly I haven't watched it yet.

I don't mean it that it doesn't fit the show.

All I mean is that if I give away tokens which make others act nice I seem (imho) as a nice person (I don't expect people who be treated badly to behave nicely but rather people who are treated nice to be nice to others to) and hence I should be safe.

However I risk being eliminated because I have to much bad trauma on myself. Sure, I could get that maybe you need to shoot it out / speak out with someone or you may not be able to live with it so to speak. But that wasn't the impression I've got. Guess I should reread it again maybe. But I think I was correct from a mechanic perspective and for me it doesn't work logically if it's the cylons who box someone who has been turning others bad or a human which has made them behave nicely.

Though it do make for more interesting options (and much harder to figure out who's a cylon.)
 
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A ok. Sorry, but the event that inspired the elimination portion of the game kind of works the same way, one of the characters was on trial and facing the death penalty, He effectively passed off his "antagonistic trauma" to other people in the fleet by playing off old fears, grudges, and prejudices. The trauma tokens are an abstraction, there are a lot of ways to thematically apply it. For example, as I recall both of Hot Dog's abilities are related to the fact that he is a confident and self assured character that sometimes drifts over into arrogance, giving him a red token in the game might not be putting him in a bad mood, it might just be saying something that makes him think he's hot stuff and ends badly.

Though thinking more on it I now kind of want to homebrew "mood titles" Or something that you get based on trauma totals, stuff like "wracked by guilt" or "nightmares" for bad and "hero of the people" and "clean conscience" for good. It would keep trauma regulation a factor while sidestepping the elimination angle.
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aliquis wrote:
All I mean is that if I give away tokens which make others act nice I seem (imho) as a nice person (I don't expect people who be treated badly to behave nicely but rather people who are treated nice to be nice to others to) and hence I should be safe.


You're looking at it in a different way. It's not kum-ba-yah on BSG.

Your character has pent up trauma at game start. If they have stress (bad trauma) they need to get rid of it before the trial/boxing. You're not trying to be nice, you're venting your stress at those around you. If you're trying to be nice you're bottling up your stress inside you and it has a chance of killing you from the inner self-conflict.
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Gerry Smit
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So when you vent your problems, the NPC ally catches your venting, causing him his own problems.
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GerryRailBaron wrote:
So when you vent your problems, the NPC ally catches your venting, causing him his own problems.


And they cause problems for whoever he runs into next, and so on...


When you get to the nebula, it's a stressful situation, and everyone shows their true feelings - humans who've not been dealing with their problems snap and run amuck, while Cylons who've been ignoring their similarities to humans suddenly decide that all anyone needs is a big hug and everything will be okay.

The humans get rid of the biggest jerk as an object lesson and everyone else calms down; the Cylons box the lines of the leaders of the "live and let live" movement, and the remainder rediscover their genocidal zeal...
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