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Subject: Minor Wars - An Excalibur Revolution Campaign: Session 5 rss

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Aapo Alasuutari
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Welcome back, once again, to Minor Wars! While the heroes of old and new sleep and toil, the minors come knocking and make the world boil!

Do not fret if you've missed the previous installations, just follow the links backwards in time! Last time our world looked a bit like this.

Now let us spike the drinks and get ready for another round!

We began with a world waiting for yet another Russo-Turkish War. April started with a bout of Voltaire studying in Russia, granting the Russians 2 political points. The British moved their single infantry corps to Lisbon by fleet in order to stand and defend against the Spanish. In response the Spanish sailed their fleet to safety in French Toulon and detached two corps worth of infantry and militia from the Cadiz area. The Spanish army of three corps gathered in Badajoz. The Turkish army continued their mobilisation.

May finally started the first true minor war of the campaign as the Persian Shah decided to invade Turkey. Suddenly all hopeful sentiments in Turkey regarding the coming war were drowned in the Black Sea. The Persian invaders numbered 60 factors in total and with their supply source being located in the Georgian mountains, the Turkish simply wouldn't have the time to deal with the invasion before the war with Russia began. With grave regrets the Turkish Grand Vizier was sent to deliver a surrender to the Persians. As the war with Russia had yet to realize, the surrender would not hurt the Turkish too much. The only truly unrecoverable thing caused by it was that Military Border revolted against the Turks and rejoined Austria, as Turkey fell into instability.

In Lisbon the English defenders faced an attack from three Spanish corps lead by Castanos. The English defending general, whose name seemed quite unimportant even to the men serving under him, trusted that the superior training of his forces would seal the day and took defensive positions outside the city of Lisbon. Castanos, however, was sneaky enough to try and outmaneuver the British defenders and flank them. The first round was inconclusive, the British killing two Spanish militia and losing one red coat, but as the flanking force lead by Castanos struck the defending forces, their will to fight was left in shambles. The defenders failed to kill any men after the first round while they lost a total of 10 infantry factors in the last two rounds of combat and broke on the third. Luckily the Spanish do not have any cavalry in their corps during the first phase, meaning that the British were left to straggle away from the field with no further losses. It became clear, though, that the Spanish had decisively won the War for Portugal and that the British would lose nearly all if not all of their forces to the treacherous backwoods of Portugal.

June brought a trade surplus to Austria and finally kicked off the Second Russo-Turkish War as Turkey declared war upon Russia, claiming that the Russian armies in Podolia were poised to strike upon legitimate Turkish province of Crimea and that Turkey had to take action against the aggressors. No combat was fought as of yet, but the Turkish armies started to move against Kharkov and a lone Ottoman corps rushed to besiege Astrakhan, managing to conquer it some months later.

The bloodbath in the east finally started in July as the Turks attacked one of the two Russian stacks north of Kiev. Another battle was also fought in Porto, where the English defenders had retreated. Event brought good harvest to France and Prussia declared war on Berg in order to subdue the small kingdom.

The slugfest of Ukraine was fought between the old adversaries, Khan and Suvorov. Suvorov went ahead with a bold move, setting up only minimal forces and the guard to hold the line while he took personal control of a large force of infantry and militia and attempted to flank the oncoming attackers. Khan had no reservations about attacking headlong into the Russian trap, hoping to crush the pinning force before Suvorov could swing the battle to his favour. The first round was very even, both forces losing two factors, but this proved to be way too little for Khan, as Suvorov brought his flanking force to the battle during the second round and broke the Turkish morale. In total the Turkish lost 10 feudal infantry and 3 feudal cavalry to 1 Russian militia and 7 infantry factors.

In Porto the remnants of the British defense forces took defensive positions yet again, but a Spanish echelon lead by Castanos punched right through their thinned lines and won the day. Only 5 of the original 11 infantry factors defending made it off the battlefield. As Lisbon had already fallen and Porto was now put under siege, any hope the British had of getting the remaining troops they had in Portugal back to England was lost. The next month would see the few remaining Hanoverian infantry perish to forage and the remaining red coats fall to a Spanish attack.

In August the Prussian army was shaken by deserters, as some men in the army deemed the war against Berg too cowardly an attack and left through an event. Otherwise the only point of interest was the continued bloodbath in Ukraine as the Turkish armies attacked a small Russian army of three corps lead by Bagration. Khan decided to try and outwit the small defending force and tried to flank them, but Bagration was smarter and had set up his forces into a cordon. The result was quite unfortunate, as the attackers broke on the first round of combat, losing one feudal infantry and one feudal cavalry and a further 4 feudal cavalry to the following pursuit, while the Russians only lost 4 militia. Suvorov himself joined the pursuit, reinforcing from the neighbouring area. Most devastatingly, though, Khan himself was wounded in the pursuit and was forced to relinquish command for two months. It seemed that the Turkish attacks were failing one after another.

September brought relief to the Turks. The Russian army did not have the money to attack the Turkish army and instead gathered up somewhat to save money. This gave the Turks a chance to lay siege to Kiev, cutting the Russian armies out of supply. At the same time a lone Ottoman corps marched to Moscow to lay siege, though they did not take advantage of a breach that was made, likely due to lack of forces. This, however, would likely force the Russian armies to fall back towards Moscow, giving Turkey time to consolidate his grip on the Ukraine-Astrakhan area.


There, that's all for this week, see you again next week, I guess. Before I go, however, I present to you: Pictures
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Warren Bruhn
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Roseburg
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AapoAlas wrote:
The slugfest of Ukraine was fought between the old adversaries, Khan and Suvorov. Suvorov went ahead with a bold move, setting up only minimal forces and the guard to hold the line while he took personal control of a large force of infantry and militia and attempted to flank the oncoming attackers...

...

[different battle]

The result was quite unfortunate, as the attackers broke on the first round of combat, losing one feudal infantry and one feudal cavalry and a further 4 feudal cavalry to the following pursuit, while the Russians only lost 4 militia. Suvorov himself joined the pursuit, reinforcing from the neighbouring area.


I'm curious about these two rules.

Re the first of the two battles above: Your group does not play that leaders are with the pinning force during an outflank? I thought it was the standard EiA rule to have leaders with the pinning force.

Re the second of the two battles above: Since the Turks broke in the first round, how did Suvarov reinforce from an adjacent area? If the battle is over, you still allow a reinforcing attempt?
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Aapo Alasuutari
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The "Suvorov with the flanking force" is partially just a thing I said for the flavour of it and partially it is a reference to a joke within our group: In our games, Suvorov has a VERY bad track record with outflanking. He has gotten lost in marshes, forests and plains; generally the more important a fight, the more likely it is that he doesn't manage to outflank, and since it is the leaders strategic skill being tested for outflank succeeding, it has become customary for us to blame unsuccessful outflanks on the orienteering skills of the leader.

And the second thing, yes, we allow a reinforcing attempt after every combat round. This is actually part of the standard rules:

EiA Rules wrote:
7.5.2.11 STEP ELEVEN-REINFORCING ATTEMPTS: After each round of a combat "day," players may attempt to reinforce from adjacent land areas.


Since the first round has ended, reinforcing attempts can be made by both sides, even though one of them broke. Usually this is used by players to bring in more cavalry to either pursuit or bear the brunt of the pursuit to avoid having massive amounts of infantry die.
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