John A. White
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I am working on a Mystery game THEME

the title "Might Be" Ruby Rue, or mystery something.
The charactors are
Raggy
Relma
RafRey
Reddy

And there are Roggy Reats.
The art will look similar to the Hanna Barbara Property.

What should I avoid in regard to making mistakes.
EDIT: WB owns the rights, and uses HB to make stuff.



 
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If pasta companies can get away with branding cavatappi noodles as "Scoobi Doo" (I have such a package in my cupboard), you're probably fine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavatappi
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Christopher Halbower
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Is your goal to make a Scooby Doo board game? Or a parody?

I don't think Hasbro has the license to Scooby Doo. I think Warner Brothers owns it now.
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John A. White
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halbower wrote:
Is your goal to make a Scooby Doo board game? Or a parody?

I don't think Hasbro has the license to Scooby Doo. I think Warner Brothers owns it now.


Help me out!
My goal is parody am I doing it wrong? The game is a deduction card game. I don't want to cross a line and will pull back as much as required.
 
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Christopher Halbower
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You could approach it from the point of view that you are making a Scooby Doo game. Then see if you can get it published.

If you are turned down, then you could make a parody/knock-off game.

I don't think the parody would sell all too well. The license would be difficult to obtain. I think your goal should be to make a cool game that you can be proud of.
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well you are using trademarked properties, even by changing the name slightly i fear you might still be in a spot of trouble. Imagine me selling a soda name "boca bola" with the exact same typeface as everyone's favorite softdrink, chances that i am getting sued are high
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John A. White
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halbower wrote:
You could approach it from the point of view that you are making a Scooby Doo game. Then see if you can get it published.

If you are turned down, then you could make a parody/knock-off game.

I don't think the parody would sell all too well. The license would be difficult to obtain. I think your goal should be to make a cool game that you can be proud of.

So move off of the names and just use Cartoon "Teen sleuths", No Dog.

I just though it would be funny talking like the dog.
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Keep in mind that there is a huge difference asking if you could be sued or could you win.

They would start with a cease and desist letter. You would have to decide if you want to/afford to fight.

They sue because they have deep pockets and you go in debt defending yourself. You might be able to win in the end but can you really afford to.

Can you afford Justice?


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Sturv Tafvherd
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aVoidGames wrote:
I am working on a Mystery game THEME

the title "Might Be" Ruby Rue, or mystery something.
The charactors are
Raggy
Relma
RafRey
Reddy

And there are Roggy Reats.



I Rovv it!
Roooby Rooooby Rooo!
and ... Raapy Roo too!

What if you make it Irish or Scottish in theme (I forget which one had the heavier gutteral RRRs).

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Stormtower wrote:
aVoidGames wrote:
I am working on a Mystery game THEME

the title "Might Be" Ruby Rue, or mystery something.
The charactors are
Raggy
Relma
RafRey
Reddy

And there are Roggy Reats.



I Rovv it!
Roooby Rooooby Rooo!
and ... Raapy Roo too!

What if you make it Irish or Scottish in theme (I forget which one had the heavier gutteral RRRs).



I don't want to offend people (for this reason LOL)
It's nice to see someone like minded Stormtower.
I appreciate all the confirmation posts.

No one really stated if this is protected or not, or did they?
The closest I got was Boca Bola soda sold with the same art.
How does Weird Al get away with his body of work that only gets traction from pop parody? when he dose odd non-parody work it has less value.

What about garbage pale kids...? where is the line... Oh and space cadets.


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gut feeling is that it sounds a little gimmicky. This is my opinion, but when ever I read posts like this I often wonder why people bother doing things that there is a grey area? Why rehash something when you can do something original and not have to worry about anything? There is a slight difference between a pizza named after Shaggy or Scooby and someone using images that could be seen as rip offs. WB will be far more interested in coming after someone making a game than a pizza.

I think you may find that you actually turn more people off than on with what you are proposing. If you use names like Raggy and have similar looking art you run the risk of people discounting your game without even trying it as they won't be able to look past what they might see as a "slapped" on theme.

You can still do a parody but it doesn't need to be so in your face. If you want use the 70's style art and feel to the game. Even make similar characters, but make it your own and don't open the door for people to discount your game before even trying it. I know that I totally discount certain games based on theme regardless of how good they might be. Don't care how awesome a Star Trek themed game is, won't play it...
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Why do you HAVE TO copy someone else? Just make something new. We'd all like that much more, anyway.

Frankly, the whole Scooby Doo parody thing has been old and busted for a while now. The live-action film, which was basically parodying itself, was released over ten years ago.
 
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monchichi wrote:
gut feeling is that it sounds a little gimmicky.

I think you may find that you actually turn more people off than on with what you are proposing.

You can still do a parody but it doesn't need to be so in your face. If you want use the 70's style art and feel to the game. Even make similar characters, but make it your own and don't open the door for people to discount your game before even trying it.


I might take this advice... I was blocked on how to execute the dog illustration anyways (without getting in trouble).

Maybe I'll post the design (incomplete WIP) so you can see it's value.
 
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jumbit wrote:
Why do you HAVE TO copy someone else? Just make something new. We'd all like that much more, anyway.

Frankly, the whole Scooby Doo parody thing has been old and busted for a while now. The live-action film, which was basically parodying itself, was released over ten years ago.


Because everything in R's is funnier the the Q abuse in Quarriors.
 
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Martin Larouche
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Even if it IS parody, it wouldn't stop Hasbro/WB from sending C&D letters and whatnots if they don't want it published.

You will therefore stop making it, wether you are right or not, because you can't afford going to court over this. The big corporations like Hasbro knows this and use it to their advantage. It's bullying but what can we do?

What *should* be done is ask permission first. Some years back, Crunchy Frog made a "game" called "CritterTek" which was definitely a BattleTech parody, merge with baseball for some reason. Crunchy Frog asked Fasa permission before doing their product. Fasa said ok and all was well with the world.
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aVoidGames wrote:

How does Weird Al get away with his body of work that only gets traction from pop parody? when he dose odd non-parody work it has less value.


Weird Al gets permission for his parodies -

http://www.weirdal.com/faq.htm
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Mike Urban
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jumbit wrote:
Why do you HAVE TO copy someone else? Just make something new. We'd all like that much more, anyway.

Frankly, the whole Scooby Doo parody thing has been old and busted for a while now. The live-action film, which was basically parodying itself, was released over ten years ago.


Or, you could copy Dobie Gillis characters. That's what Scooby-Doo did, after all...
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Please make sure "Velma" is a raging lesbian. That's what your target market wants to see.
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As long as they are clearly parodies then you can get away with quite a bit. There have though been endless parodies so hilariously enough you might infringe on someone elses parody. Yes, that can indeed happen.

SD characters have appeared in one form or another in various things over the years. Some blatant, some very subtle. Even Archie got in on the act.
 
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stanstanminson wrote:
Please make sure "Velma" is a raging lesbian. That's what your target market wants to see.


She has a crush on Shaggy in the latest (and best) iteration of Scooby Doo: Mystery Incorporated.
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halbower wrote:
stanstanminson wrote:
Please make sure "Velma" is a raging lesbian. That's what your target market wants to see.

She has a crush on Shaggy in the latest (and best) iteration of Scooby Doo: Mystery Incorporated.

I'm going to pretend they're taking a page from The Amazing Spiderman and are constructing an alternate history. An alternate history I'm much less inclined to think about while I'm watching the show.
 
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I'm a huge fan of this latest iteration. It has a series-long story arc. The kids solve mysteries like they always have. But a mysterious bad guy called, "Mister E" (played by comedian Lewis Black) is manipulating them.

Frank Welker reprises the role of Freddy. He was the original Freddy in 1969.

Patrick Warburton plays the sheriff. Vivica A. Fox plays the DJ at K-Ghoul radio.

It's like Scooby-Doo meets X-files. I highly recommend it.
 
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Noah Mallon
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This is a "Fair Use" doctrine question. Basically, you may have an affirmative defense if:

1) your game is sufficiently transformative from the original IP, rather than derivative. (Hard to argue it's not derivative unless you are truly "parodying" the characters in some way, rather than just shifting the spellings around). Also, you'd look to whether your work is commercial in nature (it is), which ways against fair use.

2)The nature of the original. That is, if it's fictional, previously published, etc. This would likely go against you in most courts due to the fictional nature of the original. However, it is likely more open to parody since it is so well known.

3) The amount and substance of the original used. Here, a court would do a quantitative and qualitative analysis of how much of the original IP you are using, and to what extent your use lifts the "heart" of the original. In parody cases, the fact that you're taking the "heart" of the work (e.g., 2 Live Crew's "Pretty Woman" parody took the "heart" of the chorus, but was deemed to be essential for the parody to have effect) won't matter as much as long as your work is a true parody.

4) Effect on the original work's commercial stream. This is where you would have a big hiccup. Scooby Doo games have been made in the past, and they'll likely be made again in the future. If you are a) usurping any of the current IP owner's games' revenue, this will go against you. However, in addition, if you are b) blocking or usurping any likely potential revenue streams of the original IP that have yet to occur, this goes against you as well. The IP owner would have a pretty easy time arguing that they would likely go into this game market, due to the nature of the property (nostalgia, also for kids, fictional, cartoon, have licensed similar uses in the past, etc.), and this would likely go against you as well.

That is the boring copyright defense brief analysis that a court would probably go through. Honestly, what you're doing doesn't sound like a parody, b/c you're not critiquing the original property (except maybe Scooby's speech, but that's probably a stretch) through humor, rather you're just looking to capitalize on the humorous nature of the Scooby character that the original IP owners also try to do on a regular basis. From purely a copyright standpoint, you'd have a hard time winning that case I think....but courts are known to do odder things.

That being said, I think the "are you going to get sued and can you afford it" questions are the most practically relevant here.

Would you get sued?

At some point, if you have some small success at least, then yeah, probably. This is because that whoever owns the rights to Scooby Doo would like to be able to retain the ability to market a game like the one you're making if it gets popular. Why? It's popular, they know there's a market for it, so they want that revenue. If you have no success, it doesn't really matter unless they feel like you're diluting their intellectual property, then they may sue just to enjoin you from producing more of the game.

Can you afford it?

A lawsuit? No. If you had that amount of money, you'd probably be able to afford the license. A cease and desist letter? Sure. But then you have to go back to the drawing board or risk a lawsuit knowing you're already on their radar. Then you're into the time and expense of redesigning your game.

It's up to you. If you're just doing it for fun, then go for it and don't sell it. If you're looking to do a limited or mass-production commercial run...you can listen to people smarter than me and get their opinion....but I wouldn't do it.arrrh
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Stormtower wrote:
and ... Raapy Roo too!


No! Bad dog!
 
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