Recommend
8 
 Thumb up
 Hide
34 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: Space Empire 4X vs Twilight Imperium rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Kyle Reesman
United States
Sarver
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
I am stuck in a debate over these two games. Any opinions on them would be great. I like the 4x a lot on computers yet I prefer board games a lot more though more human interaction.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Gresik
United States
Bolingbrook
IL
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
One plays in about 3 hours, the other about 3 days. It depends on how much time you have...and how much your gaming friends have.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Niko
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
[This space intentionally left blank]
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
I have only played Space Empires, but I'll answer based on what I have heard and read about Twilight Imperium.
Space Empires is indeed quicker, you can play a small two player game in 2 hours; Twilight Imperium will take pretty much a whole day.

The main difference though is the mechanics of the game. Space Empires is a wargame. Maybe not the most complicated one, but it is conflict centered and the only way to win is by destroying your enemies.
Twilight Imperium is a role selection game were combat is not an optimal move (again, this might not be entirely accurate as I have never played the game)

Another difference is player count. Space Empires plays well with anywhere from 1 to 4 players, in both co-op (against the board) and competitive mode. Twilight Imperium seems to be best with 6 and only 6.

I'd say give the Space Empire PC games a shot. The board game has a lot less micro-management, but the general feel is the same. If you like it and think your group will like it go for it.
I also want to point out that the Space Empires expansion, Close Encounters, adds a whole bunch of options like empire advantages, technology cards, and ground combat. The game is already fun without it, but it does make it even better and gives players more options.

EDIT: I went looking for previous threads comparing the two, but all I could find compared SE4X to Eclipse. Still worth a read since it does discuss why you might wan to get SE4X
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Miles Wentland
United States
Wellington
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Roar
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The answer is simple:

Both
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Hackman
United States
Champaign
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
SE:4X = All about conflict, basic components, clever play, hidden information.

TI:3 = lots of theme, negotiating and backstabbing, radically different races, victory point focus, random events

Easy things to consider
Length - TI:3 is much longer. Is that good or bad for you?
Components - TI:3 looks awesome when all the plastic is on the board. Does your group care about that?
Number of players - For solo and two-player Space Empires is your only choice. If you want to play with more than 4 you'll need TI:3.

Less obvious considerations
Writing info - In SE:4X you write down your tech and spending each round and no one else sees it. It adds the hidden info element but some people just don't like the possibility of someone making a mistake.

Victory Points - TI:3 gives you all sorts of cool stuff to play with, but often the person who wins is the one who ignores all the theme and just focuses on the most efficient way to get victory points. The game doesn't end with someone conquering a capital but with someone flipping a hidden agenda card or researching a tech they don't even need. If you are open to house ruling, though, you can mold the TI:3 experience into whatever you want it to be.

Both games have expansions that add a lot.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Larouche
Canada
Longueuil
Quebec
flag msg tools
Melting souls with cuteness since 2007
badge
Lovin' N-16
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Oh boy. What a choice.

Twilight Imperium 3 and Space Empire 4X are the only 2 games i rate a perfect 10.

Twilight Imperium 3:

Pros:
- Lots of politics and diplomacy involved
- Many different mechanics that form a whole: trading, negociation, production, influence, technology, etc.
- Lots of plastic miniatures
- Plays up to 8 players (with the first expansion).

Cons:
- Takes about 1¼ hour per player - IF you are experienced with the game.
- REQUIRES the first expansion to fix problems in the base game (those problems are not apparent at first, but will become painfully obvious after 3 or 4 plays).
- Cannot be played with 2 players (outside horrible [IMO] player-made custom variants)

Space Empire 4x:
Pros:
- Lots of scenarios to manage an epic and very long game to a short and fast one.
- Plays very well with 2 players.
- Does not require the expansion to fix anything.
- Hidden information.

Cons:
- Requires writing and bookkeeping.
- base game is lacking in some traditional aspects of space 4x games, such as ground troops and racial differences (included in the expansion).
- Visual aspect is hit or miss.

That said, both are absolutely awesome games.
Bottom line: Space Empire 4X is a great wargame while Twilight Imperium 3 is a great civilization game.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Larouche
Canada
Longueuil
Quebec
flag msg tools
Melting souls with cuteness since 2007
badge
Lovin' N-16
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pomomojo wrote:

Victory Points - TI:3 gives you all sorts of cool stuff to play with, but often the person who wins is the one who ignores all the theme and just focuses on the most efficient way to get victory points. The game doesn't end with someone conquering a capital but with someone flipping a hidden agenda card or researching a tech they don't even need. If you are open to house ruling, though, you can mold the TI:3 experience into whatever you want it to be.


We could start a debate on that, but i think you didn't catch TI3's theme at all.
The theme is to put yourself as the governing race of the galactic council. To that end, making yourself superior through various means can achieve this goal:
- displaying your superior production capacity (spend X resources for victory points)
- displaying your influence (spend X influence for victory points)
- displaying your technological mastery (getting lots of techs)
- showing your military might (various military objectives against other players)
- showing your mastery of trading (spend X trade goods)

The goal is definitely not to crush your opponents. The goal is to prove you have what it takes to be the lead of the council. There is no "ignoring the theme", as you put it, to win the game.

I always make the comparison of TI3's theme to the Star Wars prequels Darth Sidious (not a statement on wether the movies were good or not). Sidious was simply playing a game of TI3: making diplomatic agreements with other factions, using political cunning, sometimes using military might to win a fight here or there (though his goal was not to crush his opponents completely, it was just ploys to put himself in power), using technological innovations from time to time (the clones themselves, earth-shaking bombs [clone wars series], etc.).
In the end, he got enough "Victory Points" that the other nations just let him get all the power he wanted so he could have his "empire" and rule everyone.

On the other side, the Jedi only focused on the war aspect, mistaking the TI3 game for Risk... and they lost.

I've seen TONS of TI3 players making lots of production of ships and lots of techs to crush their opponents and they always lost badly with only 2 or 3 VPs gained while the winner had 10. Those players wanted to play Space Empire 4X and got a civ game instead...
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moritz Akellos
Germany
Berlin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I am really interested in this game, but i will seldom get more than 3 or maybe 4 players to play itsoblue. Would you still recommend it under these circumstances?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Larouche
Canada
Longueuil
Quebec
flag msg tools
Melting souls with cuteness since 2007
badge
Lovin' N-16
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Dr_M_Akellos wrote:
I am really interested in this game, but i will seldom get more than 3 or maybe 4 players to play itsoblue. Would you still recommend it under these circumstances?


3 or 4 players TI3 is still a blast.

Personally, my sweet spot is with exactly 4 players. With experienced players, it last on average 5 hours (which is still manageable) and offers lots of possibilities dealing with others.

More players is good, but very long.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle Reesman
United States
Sarver
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
This has been a lot of help I am enjoying it. It is a lot fun to read. I traditionally was a Risk and tactical game player. These two game are a huge jump for me so its why I was wondering about rule difficult?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
flag msg tools
The Freedom Rider - Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers
badge
The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil - George Saunders
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Basically the comparison is between a sci-fi wargame and a game that began as ameritrash (in versions 1 and 2), but showed the effects of eurogame cross-pollenation in 3rd edition.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Damerell
msg tools
Nineteen wrote:
SE4X has a much better set of rules, if that is a concern.


I like TI3, but I think that's fair comment. The TI3 rules are designed for approachability, not replayability - which is fair enough, but does make finding things difficult.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Hackman
United States
Champaign
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
deedob wrote:
pomomojo wrote:

Victory Points - TI:3 gives you all sorts of cool stuff to play with, but often the person who wins is the one who ignores all the theme and just focuses on the most efficient way to get victory points. The game doesn't end with someone conquering a capital but with someone flipping a hidden agenda card or researching a tech they don't even need. If you are open to house ruling, though, you can mold the TI:3 experience into whatever you want it to be.


We could start a debate on that, but i think you didn't catch TI3's theme at all.
The theme is to put yourself as the governing race of the galactic council. To that end, making yourself superior through various means can achieve this goal:
- displaying your superior production capacity (spend X resources for victory points)
- displaying your influence (spend X influence for victory points)
- displaying your technological mastery (getting lots of techs)
- showing your military might (various military objectives against other players)
- showing your mastery of trading (spend X trade goods)

The goal is definitely not to crush your opponents. The goal is to prove you have what it takes to be the lead of the council. There is no "ignoring the theme", as you put it, to win the game.

I always make the comparison of TI3's theme to the Star Wars prequels Darth Sidious (not a statement on wether the movies were good or not). Sidious was simply playing a game of TI3: making diplomatic agreements with other factions, using political cunning, sometimes using military might to win a fight here or there (though his goal was not to crush his opponents completely, it was just ploys to put himself in power), using technological innovations from time to time (the clones themselves, earth-shaking bombs [clone wars series], etc.).
In the end, he got enough "Victory Points" that the other nations just let him get all the power he wanted so he could have his "empire" and rule everyone.

On the other side, the Jedi only focused on the war aspect, mistaking the TI3 game for Risk... and they lost.

I've seen TONS of TI3 players making lots of production of ships and lots of techs to crush their opponents and they always lost badly with only 2 or 3 VPs gained while the winner had 10. Those players wanted to play Space Empire 4X and got a civ game instead...


Fair enough. What I mean by ignore the theme is often the way to score victory points requires players to do odd things that only make sense in a purely mechanical way. So rather than seeing players display mastery of tech or trade or military you get players attacking planets far away from their empire or focusing all their attention on space docks or some other thing that does not seem thematically integrated, especially since often only one player can benefit from doing it.

I very much like the use of victory points in the game and am perfectly fine with limited military interactions. I do think, however, that the requirements for victory could have been integrated in a more streamlined and interactive way than just dealing out random cards. A point for having one of each color tech is dull since there's not interaction or buildup. A point for having the most tech would be fun, because it would be more interactive and would thematically make sense with the scenario you spelled out.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Larouche
Canada
Longueuil
Quebec
flag msg tools
Melting souls with cuteness since 2007
badge
Lovin' N-16
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pomomojo wrote:
deedob wrote:
pomomojo wrote:

Victory Points - TI:3 gives you all sorts of cool stuff to play with, but often the person who wins is the one who ignores all the theme and just focuses on the most efficient way to get victory points. The game doesn't end with someone conquering a capital but with someone flipping a hidden agenda card or researching a tech they don't even need. If you are open to house ruling, though, you can mold the TI:3 experience into whatever you want it to be.


We could start a debate on that, but i think you didn't catch TI3's theme at all.
The theme is to put yourself as the governing race of the galactic council. To that end, making yourself superior through various means can achieve this goal:
- displaying your superior production capacity (spend X resources for victory points)
- displaying your influence (spend X influence for victory points)
- displaying your technological mastery (getting lots of techs)
- showing your military might (various military objectives against other players)
- showing your mastery of trading (spend X trade goods)

The goal is definitely not to crush your opponents. The goal is to prove you have what it takes to be the lead of the council. There is no "ignoring the theme", as you put it, to win the game.

I always make the comparison of TI3's theme to the Star Wars prequels Darth Sidious (not a statement on wether the movies were good or not). Sidious was simply playing a game of TI3: making diplomatic agreements with other factions, using political cunning, sometimes using military might to win a fight here or there (though his goal was not to crush his opponents completely, it was just ploys to put himself in power), using technological innovations from time to time (the clones themselves, earth-shaking bombs [clone wars series], etc.).
In the end, he got enough "Victory Points" that the other nations just let him get all the power he wanted so he could have his "empire" and rule everyone.

On the other side, the Jedi only focused on the war aspect, mistaking the TI3 game for Risk... and they lost.

I've seen TONS of TI3 players making lots of production of ships and lots of techs to crush their opponents and they always lost badly with only 2 or 3 VPs gained while the winner had 10. Those players wanted to play Space Empire 4X and got a civ game instead...


Fair enough. What I mean by ignore the theme is often the way to score victory points requires players to do odd things that only make sense in a purely mechanical way. So rather than seeing players display mastery of tech or trade or military you get players attacking planets far away from their empire or focusing all their attention on space docks or some other thing that does not seem thematically integrated, especially since often only one player can benefit from doing it.

I very much like the use of victory points in the game and am perfectly fine with limited military interactions. I do think, however, that the requirements for victory could have been integrated in a more streamlined and interactive way than just dealing out random cards. A point for having one of each color tech is dull since there's not interaction or buildup. A point for having the most tech would be fun, because it would be more interactive and would thematically make sense with the scenario you spelled out.


So... the only thing missing is fluff from the objective cards? If you say there's a galaxy-wide epidemic and the players that get 5 green technologies (biotechnologies) will possess the cure and gain a VP, making them closer to the council throne because they have "the cure".

Or a particular influencial individual in the council who declared he will give his support to the strongest nation that needs to prove themselves to him by conquering a planet. You gain a VP if you get his support...

Really, mechanics-wise, nothing's missing. Just extra fluff that's (IMO) non-essential to the game itself...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moritz Akellos
Germany
Berlin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
deedob wrote:
Dr_M_Akellos wrote:
I am really interested in this game, but i will seldom get more than 3 or maybe 4 players to play itsoblue. Would you still recommend it under these circumstances?


3 or 4 players TI3 is still a blast.

Personally, my sweet spot is with exactly 4 players. With experienced players, it last on average 5 hours (which is still manageable) and offers lots of possibilities dealing with others.

More players is good, but very long.


sounds great, thanks!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle Reesman
United States
Sarver
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
Here is a question if I get space empire 4x i will also be getting the expansion which adds like racial benefits. How is the difference in races between the two games?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Hackman
United States
Champaign
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
deedob wrote:
pomomojo wrote:
deedob wrote:
pomomojo wrote:

Victory Points - TI:3 gives you all sorts of cool stuff to play with, but often the person who wins is the one who ignores all the theme and just focuses on the most efficient way to get victory points. The game doesn't end with someone conquering a capital but with someone flipping a hidden agenda card or researching a tech they don't even need. If you are open to house ruling, though, you can mold the TI:3 experience into whatever you want it to be.


We could start a debate on that, but i think you didn't catch TI3's theme at all.
The theme is to put yourself as the governing race of the galactic council. To that end, making yourself superior through various means can achieve this goal:
- displaying your superior production capacity (spend X resources for victory points)
- displaying your influence (spend X influence for victory points)
- displaying your technological mastery (getting lots of techs)
- showing your military might (various military objectives against other players)
- showing your mastery of trading (spend X trade goods)

The goal is definitely not to crush your opponents. The goal is to prove you have what it takes to be the lead of the council. There is no "ignoring the theme", as you put it, to win the game.

I always make the comparison of TI3's theme to the Star Wars prequels Darth Sidious (not a statement on wether the movies were good or not). Sidious was simply playing a game of TI3: making diplomatic agreements with other factions, using political cunning, sometimes using military might to win a fight here or there (though his goal was not to crush his opponents completely, it was just ploys to put himself in power), using technological innovations from time to time (the clones themselves, earth-shaking bombs [clone wars series], etc.).
In the end, he got enough "Victory Points" that the other nations just let him get all the power he wanted so he could have his "empire" and rule everyone.

On the other side, the Jedi only focused on the war aspect, mistaking the TI3 game for Risk... and they lost.

I've seen TONS of TI3 players making lots of production of ships and lots of techs to crush their opponents and they always lost badly with only 2 or 3 VPs gained while the winner had 10. Those players wanted to play Space Empire 4X and got a civ game instead...


Fair enough. What I mean by ignore the theme is often the way to score victory points requires players to do odd things that only make sense in a purely mechanical way. So rather than seeing players display mastery of tech or trade or military you get players attacking planets far away from their empire or focusing all their attention on space docks or some other thing that does not seem thematically integrated, especially since often only one player can benefit from doing it.

I very much like the use of victory points in the game and am perfectly fine with limited military interactions. I do think, however, that the requirements for victory could have been integrated in a more streamlined and interactive way than just dealing out random cards. A point for having one of each color tech is dull since there's not interaction or buildup. A point for having the most tech would be fun, because it would be more interactive and would thematically make sense with the scenario you spelled out.


So... the only thing missing is fluff from the objective cards? If you say there's a galaxy-wide epidemic and the players that get 5 green technologies (biotechnologies) will possess the cure and gain a VP, making them closer to the council throne because they have "the cure".

Or a particular influencial individual in the council who declared he will give his support to the strongest nation that needs to prove themselves to him by conquering a planet. You gain a VP if you get his support...

Really, mechanics-wise, nothing's missing. Just extra fluff that's (IMO) non-essential to the game itself...


The rulebook says the goal of the game is to build a mighty empire and claim the Imperial Throne on Mecatol. The Galactic Council has lost most of its power and the goal of the game is to build your race into one so powerful that the others will submit to you. Darth Sidious used backdoor politics to conquer a weak but still existent empire. The empire no longer exists in TI:3 as all the races have retreated to their home planets and are just now in contact again.

I agree that it is a civ game rather than a war game. I agree that mastery of trade and politics and technology should count towards victory just as much as military might. I'm just pointing out to the OP that the particular grouping of cards in any game might not cohere into any sort of interesting game narrative. Some cards are interactive while others just give a VP to one race out of the blue. Players can only win by fulfilling objectives and the objectives are semi-random. Sometimes the objectives create a back and forth game of gambits and battles and political intrigue. Other times the objectives heavily favor one race or position on the board or strategy. Often players will make strange decisions that actually weaken their overall position because they need to fulfill a secret objective.

My point for the OP is that someone thinking about purchasing TI:3 might be under the impression, rightly or wrongly, that the eight hours of game play build up to a crescendo of fighting or negotiating or planet hopping. Sometimes they do. I have had other games, though, where after eight hours someone just turns over the next objective and buys a random tech and wins the game. While these games are still fun experiences, the winner is often almost sheepish that they had to do so little to get that last VP. Whether it fits the theme or not, I'm guessing it's not what most newcomers to the game expect. If this would bother the OP he might be wary of TI:3. On the other hand, there are so many modules and variants that the OP can probably make TI:3 whatever his group wants it to be.





 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Larouche
Canada
Longueuil
Quebec
flag msg tools
Melting souls with cuteness since 2007
badge
Lovin' N-16
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
The rulebook says the goal of the game is to build a mighty empire and claim the Imperial Throne on Mecatol. The Galactic Council has lost most of its power and the goal of the game is to build your race into one so powerful that the others will submit to you. Darth Sidious used backdoor politics to conquer a weak but still existent empire. The empire no longer exists in TI:3 as all the races have retreated to their home planets and are just now in contact again.


Not quite. The Republic was not an empire. It was a democracy based on a council where every nation can vote on decisions brought forth by elected representatives. This is exactly TI3. We even have pictures of the representatives with the second expansion...

I won more than one game of TI3 by never waging war on anyone and winning mainly through political agendas and lots of influence. Putting forth agendas that benefits me and the weakest players to the detriment of the leaders can win you the game if timed right. The "Sidious" scenario is quite possible as i've done it several times myself.

Best one was pushing an agenda that if won gave the leader in VP (me) a free VP. If lost, it gave all those who had completed a secret objective a new one. I was the only player who had completed it. So the other players had to decide to give me a VP or a second secret objective. They choose the secret. A turn later, i completed it by controlling Mecatol rex with 6 ground troops, gaining 2 more VP and winning the game. If that's not a Sidious "plot" i don't know what is... just replace ground troops with clone troopers and Rex with Coruscant...
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Larouche
Canada
Longueuil
Quebec
flag msg tools
Melting souls with cuteness since 2007
badge
Lovin' N-16
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sarcen wrote:
Here is a question if I get space empire 4x i will also be getting the expansion which adds like racial benefits. How is the difference in races between the two games?


You draw a card from a deck that gives you your "race". It's nothing elaborate like what's in TI3. An example would be "insectoids": your ships are 1 hull size smaller. Another would provide a bonus while colonizing alien worlds, etc.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
flag msg tools
The Freedom Rider - Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers
badge
The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil - George Saunders
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
From your perspective it probably won't work, because it's designed for three players, but have a look at Web and Starship anyway. It's an extremely clever game, where the different races operate in truly unique fashion.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle Reesman
United States
Sarver
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
So races in Space Empire 4X is simplistic not a bad thing. While Twilight has the appeal of playing in the framework of existing factors and adapting to them the Space Empire has appeal because it give the players more control in way of their play style
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jay Sheely
United States
Hayward
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've played both and I HIGHLY prefer SE:4X.

I didn't read every single response in this thread but what I like the most in SE is that no one knows what ships you've built or what technology you have invested in until the moment of battle.

And then they only know what you have in that battle!

What are these on my right flank? Decoys? Scouts or huge battleships?

Space Empires all the way. It's not 'gorgeous' like TI but you'll forget all that almost immediately.

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Challis
United Kingdom
Hungerford
West Berkshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
TI3 is best at 6-8 players.

As an early poster noted it's emphatically not a wargame, it's a civ game with war being possible, but generally unfavourable.

People who want a wargame, or think victory should hinge on military goals are often disappointed (see above).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Hackman
United States
Champaign
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
deedob wrote:
Quote:
The rulebook says the goal of the game is to build a mighty empire and claim the Imperial Throne on Mecatol. The Galactic Council has lost most of its power and the goal of the game is to build your race into one so powerful that the others will submit to you. Darth Sidious used backdoor politics to conquer a weak but still existent empire. The empire no longer exists in TI:3 as all the races have retreated to their home planets and are just now in contact again.


Not quite. The Republic was not an empire. It was a democracy based on a council where every nation can vote on decisions brought forth by elected representatives. This is exactly TI3. We even have pictures of the representatives with the second expansion...

I won more than one game of TI3 by never waging war on anyone and winning mainly through political agendas and lots of influence. Putting forth agendas that benefits me and the weakest players to the detriment of the leaders can win you the game if timed right. The "Sidious" scenario is quite possible as i've done it several times myself.

Best one was pushing an agenda that if won gave the leader in VP (me) a free VP. If lost, it gave all those who had completed a secret objective a new one. I was the only player who had completed it. So the other players had to decide to give me a VP or a second secret objective. They choose the secret. A turn later, i completed it by controlling Mecatol rex with 6 ground troops, gaining 2 more VP and winning the game. If that's not a Sidious "plot" i don't know what is... just replace ground troops with clone troopers and Rex with Coruscant...


Yes, empire was a bad choice of word to describe the Star Wars scenario. Sidious clearly used democracy as a weapon (which I actually think was the best part of the prequels). TI:3 flavor text does reference thrones and empires quite a bit.

Winning a game of TI:3 by political maneuvering sounds great. The politics is my favorite part of the game (and what separates it from other 4X games) when interesting cards get drawn.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kyle Reesman
United States
Sarver
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
I still an not decided between the two just because the both have suck great appeal for totally different reasons. Though I feel Space Empires may win just because of price.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.