Iori Yagami
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Time and time again I am so surprised that a game I have in my hands looks so much better in an ad than in reality. I am not even talking about disappointing gameplay and overblown ad hype (happen all the time - no hype - no sell, right? whistle), but about visual quality.
The pictures on cards, boards sheets or whatever are usually much more bright, clear, vivid and crisp on monitor screen than on actual piece, where it is too dark, murky, with printing artifacts like color misalignment and graininess and what not.
Too much of good, beautiful artwork is lost on me because pics are too small, dark and muddy. shake
Am I just unlucky, or is it the way it works, kinda like those fast food ads (you know, shiny plump burger as advertised vs real sloppy messy deformed sandwich.)
Oddly enough, in some gameplay videos. components also look very good, at least better than on my table. What is going on?ninja
Is it psychology, where you want and glorify what you don't have, and diminish and sigh at what you already have?blush
Is it something wrong with my eyes?
Is it bad luck for me always getting inferior factory printing?
Am I just imagining things?
Are those thing real, and nobody is bother by them, except the most thorough and pedantic ones, like me?
I am getting disapponted with games for many reasons, and this is one other droplet. soblue
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Boaty McBoatface
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Remember the contents may differ from those displayed (how often do you see this?).

It's not you, it is a common feature of promotions, be it food, DVD's or games.

Ye I am bothered by it, but there is very little that can be done about it (baring what I do, which is wait for a cheap copy), or (if it i that kind of product) buy the same thing from someone else.
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mike
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Happens all the time in advertising, look at the fast food industry, how great to those Burgers look in printed ads or in a commercial but are utterly disappointing in real life
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Garry Clarke
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It's sort of thing happens all the time. There are loads for reasons for this, ask any graphic artist and they'll tell you.

The main reason is on screen you are using RGB colours and the colours 'shine' at you, black is the absence of light and white is all the RGB full on. Print is the opposite, you work with more colours, CYMK (maybe a few others as well), and they work with reflected light, black is all the ink overlaid and white is the complete absence of any ink (white paper).

So two very different ways of representing colours and you can't print all the shades of RGB using CYMK, it does get more complicated that this. But that's a good starting point.
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Travis Worthington
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Garry wrote:
It's sort of thing happens all the time. There are loads for reasons for this, ask any graphic artist and they'll tell you.

The main reason is on screen you are using RGB colours and the colours 'shine' at you, black is the absence of light and white is all the RGB full on. Print is the opposite, you work with more colours, CYMK (maybe a few others as well), and they work with reflected light, black is all the ink overlaid and white is the complete absence of any ink (white paper).

So two very different ways of representing colours and you can't print all the shades of RGB using CYMK, it does get more complicated that this. But that's a good starting point.


This - screens are back lit, cards are not.

Its one of the reasons why iPads took off in the corporate world - a presentation shown to someone on the high res, backlit screen of an iPad looks way better than it does on a piece of paper or projected on a screen.
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i had the opposite impression with elder sign


but i have a long and glorious history of ordering things out of comic books or from the back of cereal boxes so i already have a good expectation of what i am going to get when looking in a catalog.

being surprised by a game like elder sign was pretty awesome
 
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Gláucio Reis
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I don't usually notice any significant difference, but it was big with my box of Kingdom Builder. However, even the images in the gallery differ from each other in this case.



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Brian W
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I don't think this is a marketing ploy like fast food advertising : )

Very likely the publisher is sending nearly the same graphic (albeit a CMYK version) to the printer. Monitor and print use different color gamuts, and different papers and different finishes will show off the colors differently. Generally glossy papers yield more vivid colors, but are also more reflective and gather fingerprints/smudges more readily -- so it's a tradeoff.

I'm sure publishers all would like their printed material to look as good as they do on the graphic designers' screen. However I also suspect that most of them don't go into detail with their printer about color reproduction (at least this has been my experience) and by the time you get proofs from the printer, it's hard to justify delaying printing to bicker over color saturation unless the issue is pretty severe.
 
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Iori Yagami
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Well, quality also differs from game to game, maker to maker.whistle
Take, for example, Magic: the Gathering card, and compare to Arkham Horror item card. Clear difference in everything - paper, printing, finish, cutting. Okay, MtG is better since it is marketed as TCG, and cards are used and seen a lot (shuffled, held, dropped on table and picked up, whereas in AH, it is mostly a sort of marker - memory aid thing, but still. Their artistic illustrations are simply not comparable - one jumps out of its pants trying to present the best picture possible, and the other is a vague smudge you keep squinting at to finally understand what it is.
The one that disappointed me a lot was Potion-Making (Зельеварение) from Russian maker. It was praised as good polygraphic quality, but it was a lie - maybe better than a flimsy flaking grayish chinese playing card deck for $1.00, but still not *good*. Some texts were not quite readable, and all hard work graphic designers done on card frame decorations and art illustrations was lost due to printing smudginess. On their website, it looks like a clear colourful cartoon, though.
Also, in many random review videos with actual components in hands, they still look better than in my own hands. Is it my imagination? Or the lighting? Or perhaps, the monitor that flatters?
 
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Dan Wojciechowski
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80sgamer wrote:
Happens all the time in advertising, look at the fast food industry, how great to those Burgers look in printed ads or in a commercial but are utterly disappointing in real life


That's because those are professional model burgers. Very few burgers you meet in real life will look like those burgers.
laugh
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Dan Wojciechowski
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Iori_Yagami wrote:
Time and time again I am so surprised that a game I have in my hands looks so much better in an ad than in reality. I am not even talking about disappointing gameplay and overblown ad hype (happen all the time - no hype - no sell, right? whistle), but about visual quality.
The pictures on cards, boards sheets or whatever are usually much more bright, clear, vivid and crisp on monitor screen than on actual piece, where it is too dark, murky, with printing artifacts like color misalignment and graininess and what not.
Too much of good, beautiful artwork is lost on me because pics are too small, dark and muddy. shake
Am I just unlucky, or is it the way it works, kinda like those fast food ads (you know, shiny plump burger as advertised vs real sloppy messy deformed sandwich.)
Oddly enough, in some gameplay videos. components also look very good, at least better than on my table. What is going on?ninja
Is it psychology, where you want and glorify what you don't have, and diminish and sigh at what you already have?blush
Is it something wrong with my eyes?
Is it bad luck for me always getting inferior factory printing?
Am I just imagining things?
Are those thing real, and nobody is bother by them, except the most thorough and pedantic ones, like me?
I am getting disapponted with games for many reasons, and this is one other droplet. soblue


My experience has been that a lot of games I have purchased look beautiful. I don't know anything about you, but you might want to consider:

Do you have any degree of color blindness? Have you been tested?
How old are you? Eyesight often declines with age, particularly with the onset of cataracts. Have you had your general vision tested recently?
As someone pointed out, monitors are light producing devices. The real games rely on reflected light. What kind of light are you using while you play? Adding direct or indirect lighting may help. Have you experimented with different types of lights? Incandescent? Fluorescent? Halogen? LED? Even within a particular light type, you can find various temperatures, clear vs frosted, etc.

If might take something as simple as some added, warmer, indirect lighting to "take the blue out".
 
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Travis Worthington
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Iori_Yagami wrote:
Well, quality also differs from game to game, maker to maker.:whistle:
Take, for example, Magic: the Gathering card, and compare to Arkham Horror item card. Clear difference in everything - paper, printing, finish, cutting.


You can compare MtG to any other game out their and the artwork is always going to leagues ahead - they are the pinnacle of commercial art for a reason, they pay a lot more than any other game art and the artists can sell their originals for thousands of dollars. And its a professional honor to say you have done a magic card.

No other game will come close to attracting that level of talent. Why? Because no other game consistently makes the kind of money that MtG does - release after release.

Also at work is MtG has a smooth finish - whereas a lot of other games have a linen finish n cards. That linen finish makes the artwork darker.

Finally MtG has cardstock made to their specifications, and is 4x in cost to what others use.

So yes - if you are willing to pay $5 for 15 cards, and do that several times a week across millions of people around the world - you will get better art! It's just economics.
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Iori Yagami
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Well, I don't have any unusual eyesight problems except light myopia (I guess, like half of 'geeks' has it, probably?), but I do acknowledge that at daylight the printed stuff looks much more vibrant than with artificial lighting. Too bad, most people play indoors when it's evening or rainy outside, otherwise we'd go have fun outside in those valuble hobby time moments. (and board games outside = big mess) However, some things are unflatterable even in best lighting. Come on, Right Games, I've seen 10 penny calendars made better.yuk
Well, CCGs or not, it of course all boils down to cost of production, and those include actual physical production as well, so I understand that. Too bad it is forbidden to peek into their business's 'kitchen' and find out how actually this or that producer does it, what profits and costs, etc. Private stuff is private I guess.cool
I guess it is mostly psychology. When you pay quite a lot for a collection of cardboard plastic pieces in a large box, you expect them to be very well made and the game in them to be exciting as well.
 
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Iori Yagami
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Gah!
I can't believe I stepped on the same pile of poo again.
Of course, those LCG cards are too dark, to small to really apprecitate. Is it the case where playing it online and free on Lackey/Vassal/OCTGN/whatever is better not just because there are more players and all cards are available at once,no effort with card fiddling/storing/etc, but ALSO it looks better? Insanity! surprise
Even on the box, you just can't see the all details which are clearly seen in the banners\ads, it is just too dark.
 
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Robert Beachler
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T Worthington wrote:
Garry wrote:
It's sort of thing happens all the time. There are loads for reasons for this, ask any graphic artist and they'll tell you.

The main reason is on screen you are using RGB colours and the colours 'shine' at you, black is the absence of light and white is all the RGB full on. Print is the opposite, you work with more colours, CYMK (maybe a few others as well), and they work with reflected light, black is all the ink overlaid and white is the complete absence of any ink (white paper).

So two very different ways of representing colours and you can't print all the shades of RGB using CYMK, it does get more complicated that this. But that's a good starting point.


This - screens are back lit, cards are not.

Its one of the reasons why iPads took off in the corporate world - a presentation shown to someone on the high res, backlit screen of an iPad looks way better than it does on a piece of paper or projected on a screen.



While this is certainly true it really depends on the calibration of a person's screen to match the printed material. Graphic designers that deal with color such as comic book colorists could tell you that it you can set your system to closely match a finished product and it will help a lot in ways of making the product look good across the board. Which is also why calibration isn't cheap. The average person using their home computer or tablet will not get these same results and it's just how it is.
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Enrico Viglino
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Every time I buy cereal, I'm pissed that there isn't fresh fruit cut up in it.
 
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Iori Yagami
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Actually, that's a valid point, Cal. Dishonest advertising and product labeling is something that is somehow still tolerated in western world, esp. the States. For example, selling useless surrogate ersatz called Kreme instead of Cream is dishonest. Hard to prove the intent, but I believe most people will agree that there is intent to mislead. Writing things like 'SUPER COOL BUTTER-like substitute made of runoff water and oily grease' is legal in some countries and illegal in others. I like the approach which helps people, not corporations. (but I am a socialist Euro-peon, so what do I know? )
 
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Enrico Viglino
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I'll give a worse example in gaming - GMT lists games with neither
solo nor multi-player rules as holding 1-4 players. Many wargames
(what they do this with) can be played in such a way, but the hobby
is aware of that. It gives an incorrect impression, which is watering
down the limited information given on a box.
 
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