Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
13 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: Games related to the science. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Jose María Flores
Spain
Móstoles
Madrid
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi,

I need your help, we are raising an appointment an institute (from 12 to 18 years), and we would have to shows/teach games of scientific character = mathematical, physical, economy, environment…

Of my collection, I not which it might use.

The one that I have clear is CATAN, that shows the resource management and the probability.

What would they recommend to me?

Thank you very much

P.D.: Sorry for my terrible English.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick West
Scotland
Colinton
Edinburgh
flag msg tools
"Only two things are infinite; the universe and human stupidity....
badge
....and I'm not certain about the universe." Albert Einstein
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi Jose,

Just some suggestions:

Natural Science/Evolution:
Trias
Evo
Urland
Ursuppe

Environmental Science
Terra

Developmental Biology
The RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology Card game - available as a free download - see BGG game entry for link.

Mathematics
Backgammon
Mancala
WFF 'n PROOF
Equations (both these last two are very dry/dull though reportedly)

Geography
Source of the Nile?
10 Days in the USA (or "..in Africa" version)

Must be many more.

I have no idea who your intended audience for such games is so best not take these as recommendation but just check them out yourself.

Personally I am not sure what scientific catagory Settlers of Catan would fall into. Sure it teaches skills like basic trading, resource management and strategy but then these are not scientific skill per se are they - and many many games could provide similar insights.

Nick
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Flynn
United States
Lakeville
Minnesota
flag msg tools
mb
You may consider the following:

1) Deflexion - this is a chess-like game with the added twist that each player fires a laser after moving a piece. The pieces have mirrored surfaces so the laser beam will bounce around the board.

2) Polarity - great study in magnetics

3) Attack Vector: Tactical - This may be a bit more involved than your students enjoy but great Newtonian Physics model used in a space battle game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Li
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have not played it, but I think American Megafauna has a deep scientific background. This description of the game:

Quote:
In the the advanced version, the continent of Laurentia is occasionally flooded or glaciated; greenhouse levels change; and the three Milankovich cycles are handled by cards that occur with historical probabilities. Biome cards, including cycad prairies, mountains, ice sheets, and mangrove swamps, appear on the map in succession according to "climax" ratings.


sure appeals to the geologist within me! cool
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
(The Artist formerly known as) Arnest R
Germany
Munich
Bavaria
flag msg tools
badge
Keep calm and carry on...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist.php3?action=view&listi...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jody Ludwick
United States
Indiana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Primordial Soup, a clever game of gene pool management followed by Urland are considered the 'Hooked on Biology' games in our household.

Primordial Soup
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/124

Urland
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/2539
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dane Peacock
United States
Stansbury Park
Utah
flag msg tools
badge
That tickles
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mathematical = try Geist
http://boardgamegeek.com/game/10765
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Blue Guldal
United States
Brooklyn
NY - New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Everything mentioned above is great! I also highly recommend Polarity, Deflexion, Ricochet Robot, and Evo. Trias and Ursuppe are great but are a bit dry and there is a lot of down time in Ursuppe (Primordial Soup) which might cause youngens to lose interest.

You should definetely consider:

ZENDO - ice house pieces from looney labs. Zendo is a great deduction game. It can be applied to mathematics, computer science, and scientific deduction in general. It is also a lot of fun and creates a nice balance of competitive AND cooperative environment. (the "students" in the game try to make educated guesses about the "rule" that governs a certain shape that the "master" builds. the master has to pay attention to everything the students do because he has to tell them if what they made fits his rule or not. all other students must pay attention to everyone else because they have to remember what fits the rule and what doesn't and develop their own hypothesis.) It is a very fine model of hypothesis driven sceince and experimentation. Once you get the ice house pieces that come with this game, there are many other awsome games that you can play with them as well, so it is a great investment. As far as I know Looney Labs people are very education oriented and I would contact them to see if they would be able to help in any way. Here's their link:
http://www.wunderland.com/icehouse/

American Megafauna: This is more a simulation than a competitive game but it is an AWSOME simulation of the evolution and extinction of flora/fauna on the American continents. The rule book is fun to read, the creatures are great. It takes 4 people to play it and it takes a good amount of time, as far as I understand. I am yet to find people who will play this with me. But when anyone says educational game about evolution, this is the first to come to mind. (Sierra Madre Games)

Insecta and Expansions: Sierra Madre Games makes these cool and cheap games that allow players to make their own creatures and launch cooperative campaigns against arthropods and such. Insecta comes with cool plastic insects! These are more sci-fi oriented and not as educational as American Megafauna, but still pretty good.
Here's Sierra Madre Games' website:
http://www.sierramadregames.com/

oh, and I had a science geeklist a while ago, you might wanna check out all the recommendatiosn I got back then:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist.php3?action=view&listi...

good luck
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Goose
United Kingdom
Hitchin
Hertfordshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Another vote for American Megafauna. The rules (at least in the first edition) are tricky to understand at first, even if English is your first language, and it is more of a simulation of evolution than a game (although it is a good game as well). I think that there is the possibility for 5 (and maybe even 6) players.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Richard Irving
United States
Salinas
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
ZENDO - ice house pieces from looney labs. Zendo is a great deduction game. It can be applied to mathematics, computer science, and scientific deduction in general.


Zendo is NOT a game of deductive reasoning (finding specific example by testing various theories--and usually finding the answer through elimination of those threories. It can't be Mr. Green, because he was shown to me earlier.), it is game of inductive reasoning (finding a rule based on multiple examples.)

More important to the discussion is that the inductive reasoning of Zendo is what the scientific method is all about: Scientists observe nature, come with a rule that explains a phenomenon (aka theory), test that theory by experiment or searching for examples in nature (fossils, rocks, stars and galaxies, living animals & plants, etc.) and so long as the theory is not disproven, it remains verified. If the theory is disproven, a new theory will have to be developed--be even in this case, the new theory has to explain everything the old did plus the new anomalous evidence.

Zendo was loosely based on an earlier inductive reasoning game, Eleusis, which uses cards. One player, named God, has a rule for playing particular card. Players test their theory of the rule by playing cards (Something like: if the last card played was red, play a lower valued card. If it is black, play a higher card. Aces are either high or low as needed.) If the cards follow the rule, they are accepted. If they don't, God will give a number of replacement cards.

If the player suspects he has no cards he can play that ill follow the rule, he appeals to God. If the player is correct, God will deal out a new hand with fewer cards. If the player is wrong, God will play a valid card and give more cards to the player.

Players can even play the role of the scientist (called in the game a Prophet) if they think have determined the theory well enough to predict God's answers.

The object is get rid of their cards (by making succesful plays) and/or become a successful Prophet.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Blue Guldal
United States
Brooklyn
NY - New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Zendo is NOT a game of deductive reasoning


sure, my bad.

Quote:
More important to the discussion is that the inductive reasoning of Zendo is what the scientific method is all about:


I will not argue, because this is not the thread for it. but I would review my definition of THE scientific method by eliminating the word theory and replacing it by model and/or hypothesis, for as much as it is not incorrect, it propagates the wrong impression among non-scientist. I have also noticed that when I say deductive, people tend to understand what I want them to think whereas inductive does not get me anywhere (I am talking about non-scientist in a very general sense, don't mean to make any absolutes.) Of course, there can be many plausible theories, hypotheses, and models that can explain a set of observations, and unfrotunately what one chooses to ask next (or where one chooses to look at for the answer) is very much influenced by which model one prefers.

This brings me back to Zendo, because players will also learn that it is sometimes hard to come up with a rule that is not actually a composite of several rules or a different way of thinking about another rule. Those tend to be very hard to solve in Zendo.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jose María Flores
Spain
Móstoles
Madrid
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I am looking at everything on what you have commented to me.

Thank you very much for the answers.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Sterrett
United States
Kansas City [Platte City]
Missouri
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
If you can get a copy, Triplanetary offers a good easy-to-learn vector movement system - and orbiting a planet falls out of the rules, with the ship literally endlessly falling around the planet.

In all of these games, you will likely run into a tradeoff between simulation accuracy and ease of play. Attack Vector's underlying physics simulation is very good, but it is harder to learn than Triplanetary. Ursuppe or Trias are easier to learn than American Megafauna, but they may not teach the lessons you want the game to deliver.

Ideally, you can find the simplest game to play that supports your learning objectives. Clarify your objective and the shape of the games you need will follow.

Dino Hunt (SJ Games) isn't much of a game, but the cards are good quick references on the dinosaurs.


Ad Astra (Attack Vector, and resellers for Megafauna) offers a discount to educators.

[Disclaimer: I'm one of Ad Astra's many volunteer development assistants, on both Attack Vector and Megafauna.]
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.