Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Railways of the World» Forums » Strategy

Subject: The Knife in the Dark: How to be a Meanie... rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Randy Brown
United States
Manchester
New Hampshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Screwing other players b/c I can has never been my style. I like to do my own thing, and beat the other players by winning. I rarely try to beat the other players by making them lose (there's a difference there).

That said, I can't stop the sinister wheels from turning in my head as I play a game. I'm collecting here some thoughts on how to mess up other players in RRT. I'm not advocating that anyone utilize these strategies: even if they work (and they probably won't in and of themselves), they will make you unpopular. But I do hope that some of you will get a kick out of this thread and add your own nasties.devil

1) Auctions: one of the most obvious ploys in a game w/ bidding is to try to run up the bid. Obviously, you need to be careful not to cook your own goose. This will only work in certain groups, but it's not too bad of an idea to make sure that whoever does go first pays for the privelege. Even in a passive group, you can probably encourage someone to pay too much to grab a new card (some ppl will go nuts to get a Land Grant).

2) Blocking moves: another obvious way to mess up another's game. In some situations this is worse for you than the person you block (like when they can go around). It costs an action, and you will not be able to lay track anywhere else that round. If you lay a full link to block (most common block, I call it "link jumping") hopefully you can make it pay for itself. I could write a whole strategy thread on blocking alone.

3) Ending/Prolonging the game: usually this is done b/c it makes sense, i.e. you're behind or ahead. Therefore, it's not really a backstab, but it's still a way to mess w/ the other players.

4) Siphoning Goods: wow, an 8-link route to deliver those cubes! Hey, I can do it w/ a 2 linker. Too bad you sold 10 shares to upgrade your train to Super Saian.

5) Urbanization/New Industry: oh my gosh, you have 8-link route for all of those purple cubes in NY! Hmmmm...I think that DC should be a purple city. The downside is that this wastes an action and 10k (w/o the card), unless you can make use of the change. Still, this is one of the meanest things you can do.

6) Snagging Tycoon Bonuses: you never know who they have, but you know what they might have. You could make sure you end the game w/ a bunch of the Tycoon victory conditions going your way. Of course it's stupid to sell out to do this. A lot of them can make sense with your strategy though: selling the fewest shares can be helpful in any game, why shouldn't you be the first to a level 6 train, and completing the NY-Chicago line isn't a bad idea in many games.

That's enough for now. Who's got some more nasty surprises?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Etherton
Scotland
Edinburgh
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: 2), I'm pretty sure you're allowed to have more than one incomplete link on the board at a time. You just can't build on more than one link in a single action. So you're still wasting an action to block, but you can sacrifice that link and just start a different one for your next action.

(I had been reading this incorrectly for a while)

-Dave
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randy Brown
United States
Manchester
New Hampshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Etherton, you are correct. I mis-wrote and shall ammend the text. However, you still cannot lay a tile to block, and with the same action lay tiles to make a link elsewhere, so you burn an action (and at least $2k) to do this kind of block. As I stated above, this type of block rarely comes up (at least in the games I've played) b/c most players will shy away from two-action links.

More common blocks involve link-jumping, or blocking out a city. We could do a whole thread just on blocks.

Seriously though, does nobody have any dirty tricks they want to share? Inquiring minds want to know...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sam Butler
United States
Fort Walton Beach
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Regarding #5, I thought you could only Urbanize/New Industry in a gray city, not change the color of a city? (Your strategy is still valid, just not the example you give.)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Beck
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
But DC is a grey city so the example is fine as is.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randy Brown
United States
Manchester
New Hampshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow, resurrecting a very old thread. How did I miss that last post and not defend myself? A year removed from this posting, I've found that I play the screwage angle less and less (not that I did it much back when I wrote this) as our group gets more sophisticated. We just don't have the actions to spare anymore.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Holman
United Kingdom
Harrow
Middlesex
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have used a spoiler move once in RRT, and it was a key part of my win of that game. My main competitor had built a lucrative 4 link route from Phili through the mountains to Pittsburgh fairly early in the game, with many blue cubes on both. I dumped a blue city on DC to reduce all those shipments to 2 links. I felt that without doing this he was would have taken too strong a lead at that fairly early stage. I went on to win the game fairly comfortably with only 4 or so shares issued.

Having said that, I think overt spoiler plays like that are mostly not a good or main tactic in this game. Whilst you lay track to be as inconveniently placed as possible for your competitors, the best general tactics seems to be to improve your position, rather than mess up opponents.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.