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Subject: Science and Technology quiz rss

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Ben Vincent
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Came across a link to this:

http://www.pewresearch.org/quiz/science-knowledge/

It's short, and the questions are rather easy. What I found interesting was the statistical breakdown at the end. I'd link that directly but I'm on my phone and it'd get messy.
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Tim P.
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This quiz is going around the interwebs, all my friends have reported the same score as I got
i.e. 13/13
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いい竹やぶだ!

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Good grief: 7% (seven percent) of the public got all answers correct.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
Fifty-nine percent of college grads answered the question about electrons and atoms correctly.
Less than a third of college grads knew which gas makes up most of our atmosphere.

I think I'll have a good cry now.

On the other hand,
Spoiler (click to reveal)
95% of college grads knew why overuse of antibiotics is bad.
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CHAPEL
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This reinforces my hypothesis that either people are really dumb, or only really dumb people took this quiz.
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Paul DeStefano
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I would think anyone on this site would miss MAYBE 2 if any at all.
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Sven Hendrickx
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I was possessively surprised by the average result. Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics. Something I don't regard as common knowledge everyone should know.
On the other hand everyone with a degree in exact sciences should score 13 out of 13.
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Kelsey Rinella
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Check the dropoff in some of those after age 65. Hard to know whether old people lose such knowledge (while retaining the ability to fill out surveys) or whether schools actually did improve a good deal some time ago. If the second, at least our averages will go up as the oldsters die off. Also interesting is that it seems as though men beat women in science generally, but the trend is reversed for medical science.
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Damian
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svenius wrote:
Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics.

None of those questions require anything more than basic science classes at the high school level.
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Christopher Dearlove
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svenius wrote:
Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics.


Introductory level to what?

Nails rusting as a chemical reaction, nitrogen most common gas, electrons smaller than atoms? Age 11 when I was at school. (OK, a selective school, but the elementary part of an age 16 exam in chemistry for the average student.)

[Yes, I'm a 13/13, any less would have been embarrassing.)
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Moshe Callen
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chaendlmaier wrote:
13/13

I gather we all did.
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Blorb Plorbst
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damiangerous wrote:
svenius wrote:
Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics.

None of those questions require anything more than basic science classes at the high school level.


The fracking question probably hasn't made it into HS text books yet since it's only recently been done with enough efficiency to make it worthwhile.

That would explain why the youngest demographic made an uncharacteristic dip in their score
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Christopher Dearlove
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whac3 wrote:
chaendlmaier wrote:
13/13

I gather we all did.


Given the filter of opening a thread labelled Science and Technology quiz, that's enough to weed out pretty much anyone who wouldn't.
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Christopher Dearlove
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CrankyPants wrote:

The fracking question probably hasn't made it into HS text books yet since it's only recently been done with enough efficiency to make it worthwhile.


Its ease comes not from science but news. I will admit that's where I got it from. (Technology news sources as well as general new sources, though.)
 
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Sven Hendrickx
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Dearlove wrote:
svenius wrote:
Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics.


Introductory level to what?

Nails rusting as a chemical reaction, nitrogen most common gas, electrons smaller than atoms? Age 11 when I was at school. (OK, a selective school, but the elementary part of an age 16 exam in chemistry for the average student.)

[Yes, I'm a 13/13, any less would have been embarrassing.)


Sure it's all high school stuff, but that doesn't mean everyone took that class. eg knowing that electrons are smaller than atoms requires a working understanding of the atomic model. If you're an engineer you should know this, if you're a lawyer you shouldn't.
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Josiah Fiscus
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Anyone not 13/13 and willing to admit it?

I don't think the results are really all that bad. Science knowledge is good, but as pointed out, the vast majority of people know the pratical things like antibiotics. Stuff like the relative sizes of electrons and atoms, while very basic, is hardly something you will use in everyday life. I'm sure there are far scarier general knowledge quizzes out there.
 
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Blorb Plorbst
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svenius wrote:
Dearlove wrote:
svenius wrote:
Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics.


Introductory level to what?

Nails rusting as a chemical reaction, nitrogen most common gas, electrons smaller than atoms? Age 11 when I was at school. (OK, a selective school, but the elementary part of an age 16 exam in chemistry for the average student.)

[Yes, I'm a 13/13, any less would have been embarrassing.)


Sure it's all high school stuff, but that doesn't mean everyone took that class. eg knowing that electrons are smaller than atoms requires a working understanding of the atomic model. If you're an engineer you should know this, if you're a lawyer you shouldn't.


That's ridiculous. Most of this stuff is just general knowledge - things you learn just by paying attention and being engaged.

I'd never want an attorney to represent me who didn't know that electrons make up atoms and are therefor smaller than them.
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Christopher Dearlove
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svenius wrote:
Sure it's all high school stuff, but that doesn't mean everyone took that class. eg knowing that electrons are smaller than atoms requires a working understanding of the atomic model. If you're an engineer you should know this, if you're a lawyer you shouldn't.


Shouldn't!? There's no way anyone shouldn't know something. Shouldn't have to is as far as that goes. But basic science stuff - and this is about as basic as it gets - should be taught to everyone at an age when the child might still become a scientist, a musician, a lawyer, a plumber, whatever.

Oddly the book I'm currently reading (well, one of them) has just referred to C.P. Snow's famous quotation as saying that not knowing the Second Law of Thermodynamics is like never having read a play by Shakespeare, and also comments about even simpler things. Should the lawyer not have read Shakespeare either?
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Blorb Plorbst
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happyjosiah wrote:
Anyone not 13/13 and willing to admit it?

I don't think the results are really all that bad. Science knowledge is good, but as pointed out, the vast majority of people know the pratical things like antibiotics. Stuff like the relative sizes of electrons and atoms, while very basic, is hardly something you will use in everyday life. I'm sure there are far scarier general knowledge quizzes out there.


I scored 13 but the Laser question made me pause: "does it use sound waves somehow?" That question was almost misleading.

The nitrogen/atmosphere question also made me second guess myself. I forget what the other options were.
 
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Dave G
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svenius wrote:
Dearlove wrote:
svenius wrote:
Good half the questions needed an introductory level in either chemistry or physics.


Introductory level to what?

Nails rusting as a chemical reaction, nitrogen most common gas, electrons smaller than atoms? Age 11 when I was at school. (OK, a selective school, but the elementary part of an age 16 exam in chemistry for the average student.)

[Yes, I'm a 13/13, any less would have been embarrassing.)


Sure it's all high school stuff, but that doesn't mean everyone took that class. eg knowing that electrons are smaller than atoms requires a working understanding of the atomic model. If you're an engineer you should know this, if you're a lawyer you shouldn't.


I was an English major in college and I am in logistics now, and I still know that electrons are smaller than atoms. That's 8th/9th grade knowledge. I probably can't name all the subatomic particles anymore and I certainly couldn't pass the AP Bio practical where I had to name all the muscles in a dissected cat, but I can't imagine forgetting some of this basic stuff.
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Chad Ellis
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happyjosiah wrote:
Anyone not 13/13 and willing to admit it?


Sure. I can never remember which gas is the most common part of our atmosphere. So 12/13 for me.
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col_w
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13/13. The only one I had to pause on for a second was the most abundant gas in the atmosphere one.

I guess that one and the fracking one would be most likely to be answered wrongly by my friends.
 
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Junior McSpiffy
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Chad_Ellis wrote:
happyjosiah wrote:
Anyone not 13/13 and willing to admit it?


Sure. I can never remember which gas is the most common part of our atmosphere. So 12/13 for me.


I missed the same one as well.
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Dean
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whac3 wrote:
chaendlmaier wrote:
13/13

I gather we all did.

I scored pi out of potato.
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J
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13/13 although I was pretty sure but not certain about which gas makes up the majority of the atmosphere. blush

EDIT: Apparently this was a common problem.
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CHAPEL
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jarredscott78 wrote:
13/13 although I was pretty sure but not certain about which gas makes up the majority of the atmosphere. blush

EDIT: Apparently this was a common problem.


Well at least we'll never have to worry about RSP'ers making bombs and blowing shit up.

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