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Everything was peaceful in the land of Vigil until Samael, the Fallen God, appeared with a terrifying army. Thus begins the story of Ascension as presented in Chronicle of the Godslayer, a game that contained neither the aforementioned Fallen God nor his slayer. By the time Samael did show up in the first expansion, Return of the Fallen, there was much deckbuilding that had been done in preparation and he was easily dispatched with. Unfortunately that didn't end well and so more deckbuilding ensued as the rebel godling, Kythis, caused a Storm of Souls. By this point Aaron, the Godslayer, finally arrived but was dismayed to find out that Kythis hadn't shown up yet. When Kythis finally arrived, all sorts of new mechanics had been discovered in the land of Vigil and some Immortal Heroes messed him up. With his defeat, Vigil has once again entered an era of peace... but mysterious shards have started appearing throughout the land and much rising is now in order.

How It Works
Ascension is a deck building game and at this point is probably best described as a game series rather than a game with a bunch of expansions (like, for instance, Dominion). Ascension was designed to be released in blocks, each of which consist of a base game and one expansion. The original release, Chronicle of the Godslayer, is the base game for the first block. If you’re not familiar with Ascension, then you can read our review for Chronicle of the Godslayer here for a good starting point.

Remember those mysterious shards that were mentioned in Ascension's riveting plot line? The mechanics introduced in Rise of Vigil are based around those shards. There are new treasures cards representing the shards and the introduction of a third currency, Energy.



Precious Energy Shards


The game consists of 100 new cards split between heroes and constructs from the four established factions along with monsters. Additionally there are 30 Energy Shards that are shuffled together with these cards to create the Center Deck. The starting decks have also been modified to contain an Energy Shard in addition to the standard 8 Apprentices and 2 Militia.

The Energy Shards are a new type of card, a Treasure, and are all identical. Energy shards are played just like a hero and provide 1 Energy and a card draw. Unlike heroes and constructs, Treasure cards are not purchased directly. Instead they are gained along with other cards in the Center Row as a sort of sweetener. If a Treasure card is turned up in the center row another card is then drawn and placed on top of the Treasure, continue doing this until a non-Treasure card is drawn and place that on top of all the Treasures. When a card is acquired or defeated, all Treasures under it are acquired as well. This creates some incentive to consider a card in the center row with Treasure underneath it that you might have otherwise ignored.



Energize abilities require Energy to use


The other new mechanic is Energy and the Energize effects that it triggers. Energy is a third type of currency that works differently than Runes and Power. It's somewhat misleading to call it a currency because rather than spending it, it is stored up and used to activate special Energize abilities that show up on some of the heroes, constructs, and monsters. They allow either an additional effect or a more powerful version of the standard ability on a card. Each Energize ability has an associate Energy threshold that must be reached in order to use the ability. Activating these abilities does not use up the Energy that has been generated in the current turn.

Rising From the Storm (of Souls)
Rise of Vigil is a stand-alone game but the rules explain how to mix it with other sets if that is so desired. Some players like to take the cards from some or all of their sets and mix them together into one massive Center Deck. I personally like to play the blocks as they were designed and don’t often move cards between blocks (or remove cards for that matter) so that is the perspective that I will be using to look at Rise Of Vigil.

Before Rise of Vigil was released there was speculation as to whether it would include some of the mechanics introduced in the second block (Storm of Souls + Immortal Heroes), namely the Events and Fanatic. This was, in a way, a question of Ascension’s fundamental design philosophy. Would each block include the mechanics from the previous blocks alongside of any new mechanics that it brought to the table? Things could get bloated pretty quickly if they kept adding to the game without also paring down to keep things simple and clean. So there were mixed emotions when it was revealed that the Events from the second block would not be appearing in Rise of Vigil. Other notable omissions include Unite effects and Soul Gems. I, for one, am very satisfied with the result. Rather than simply being an improvement or reimplementation of what was introduced in the first and second blocks, Rise of Vigil strips the game down to the core system and introduces it’s own twists and unique mechanics that haven’t been explored yet.



All set up and ready to play


Each block is in essence an exploration of the Ascension game system rather than an expansion of what came before it. This has two very positive effects. First, each block has a unique feel and is not attempting to be strictly better than the block that came before it. This gives you a compelling reasons to go back and play older blocks after you've had time to enjoy the newest set. Secondly, it keeps the game simple and quick, a core philosophy that plays to Ascension’s strengths. When I first looked through the cards included in Rise Of Vigil I was almost shocked by how simple they were. Being the third block I was expecting the complexity of the game to increase in order to explore new design space. I’m not saying the game play as a whole is simplified, just the effects on most of the individual cards. Rather than ramp up the complexity of the cards, the new mechanics have been introduced to challenge the way that players approach the game. I would likely point to the second block as being more complicated than what exists thus far in Rise Of Vigil.

So how do the new mechanics in Rise of Vigil introduce a new play experience for Ascension? Well, most obviously there is now a third "currency" to take into consideration when building your deck. In the past, players would generally commit to a strategy emphasizing Runes or Power or try to somehow create a balance between the two currencies. With a third currency to include the balancing act is much tougher. The tricky thing is that Energy requires a much different approach than Runes and Power do. There is no always-available hero that provides Energy like the Mystic and Heavy Infantry do for Runes and Power. So a player cannot simply add Energy generating cards to their deck to fine tune the balance and herein lies one of the most compelling aspects of Rise of Vigil. You can only acquire Energy-generators when Energy Shards or one of the handful of cards that directly generate Energy show up in the Center Row. However, gaining these cards may or may not synergize well with what’s already in your deck. Unlike Runes and Power, generating a bunch of Energy doesn't do anything unless you have cards with Energize abilities and even then you might generate way more Energy than you actually needed to trigger your Energize abilities. There’s a fine balance here, a few cards do want you to generate as much Energy as possible but passing up good cards to acquire Energy Shards can easily sidetrack your deck. Ideally you’d be generating exactly how much Energy is required to fire off your Energize abilities (or simply as much Energy as possible) but obviously it’s not that easy due to the fickle nature of acquiring cards that actually generate Energy.



The presence of Energy Shards makes for some tough decisions:
Should you grab that powerful Monk or snag a pile of Energy Shards along with that Shaman?



The conclusion that I’m trying to draw here is that the presence of Energy, and specifically the Energy Shards, places a good deal more emphasis on careful consideration of what cards are in the Center Row. It’s not simply a matter of what the most powerful card is or what fits best in your deck because you are also trying to balance your ability to generate Energy. This leads to tough decisions when acquiring and defeating cards.

Another subtle change that alters the way that players approach the game is the scaling back of both card draw and, to an extent, banishing powers. There are only four heroes, one construct, and two monsters for a total of 16 cards that provide card draw (excluding Energy Shards). Compare this to 25 cards from CotG and 24 cards (plus 1 Event) from SoS. For banishing there are two heroes, one construct, and one monster for a total of 12 cards that provide banishing, but 5 of these cards only have the banishing ability at an Energize cost. For reference there were a total of 12 cards from Chronicle of the Godslayer and 12 cards (plus 1 Event) from Storm of Souls that provide banishing. The main difference here are the banishing powers that only trigger at an Energy cost and thus may not provide banishing every time they show up. Not a huge change but combined with the lowered card draw, you’ve got a pretty fundamental shift in how often and how consistently you’re actually going to be able to play your key cards. This further emphasizes the importance of carefully planning which cards you are actually adding to your deck. You’re generally going to have to deal with those pesky Militia and Apprentices more often so hitting any reasonably powerful combo requires excellent planning.



Just imagine what this guy does!


I mentioned earlier how Rise of Vigil was almost shockingly simple. I want to come back and emphasize why I think this is so important. One aspect is the accessibility that is provided as a result of keeping a limited set of mechanics. When teaching a new player, you only need to explain the basic mechanics which include the new rules for Treasures and Energy. There’s no need to touch on Events, Soul Gems, Unite effects, or anything else from the previous sets that don’t show up here. Then simply explain the cards as the come up in the Center Row and players can quickly pick up how to play the game without getting overloaded with too much information. It’s only slightly more complicated than explaining Chronicle of the Godslayer which is saying a lot.

Another aspect that simplicity provides is really placing the new mechanics at the forefront and letting them shine. You don’t have a bunch of rules from older sets that are competing for your attention, the focus of this set is clearly on Energy and how to best harness and utilize it. Even the mechanics that did carry over from the previous blocks such as Trophy Monsters and Fate are used sparingly to support the theme of this set. For instance the Trophy Monsters provide Energy when they are banished and the Fate effects all deal with how many Treasures are under the Fate card when it enters the center row. This is both exciting for veteran players looking for a new experience and necessary for creating a distinct feel for this block.

Lastly, the emphasis of simplicity seems to address some of the complaints that were raised with Soul of Storms, especially once Immortal Heroes was included. Mainly, turns near the end of the game could become rather complicated and would take a long time to resolve. This is almost a non-issue in Rise of Vigil. The scaling back of banishing and card draw abilities really keeps turns short and sweet. The presence of powerful cards and stockpiling of Energy to trigger Energize effects still creates the feeling of building up towards a climax near the end of the game but it doesn’t take playing 20 heroes per turn to do so. I love Storm of Souls, but the simplicity of Rise of Vigil is a breath of fresh air after getting used to the crazy engine building that was very common in the second block.



Artwork from the three main sets (from left to right):
Chronicle of the Godslayer, Storm of Souls, and Rise of Vigil



The art in Rise of Vigil is absolutely top-notch, taking another step forward from the already excellent second block. Eric Sabee’s artwork has been steadily improving and Rise of Vigil sees him executing his unique style flawless in all facets of the game. The cards look vibrant and really pull you into the game world whether you’re familiar with the story or not. The board has been changed to a much friendly tone of blue (from tan/brown) and the different areas really pop nicely. There is another set of the basic cards: Apprentices, Militia, Mystics, and Heavy infantry but as in Storm of Souls these cards are all given new art to reinforce the theme of the block. This is a nice way to provide the essential cards that are required to make it a stand-alone game but still offer something new to the people that already own the previous sets.

What Rise of Vigil does not do is cater to players that have a problem with the occasionally swingy nature of Ascension. I absolutely do not consider this to be a problem and there are many ways to mitigate and control things so that you won't be so dependent on luck. But if you feel that Ascension is too luck dependent, this set is not going to change your mind. The high cost cards are especially powerful in this set, and I've seen them absolutely dominate a game. However, once players become familiar with what's coming these threats can be greatly diminished.



These guys can both clear the whole Center Row


The bottom line is that Rise of Vigil provides an excellent and unique experience built on the core mechanics of Ascension. New and experienced players alike will find something to enjoy in this set which can be used as a great entry point into the world of Ascension.

Pros:
*Maintains the accessibility and quick set up that Ascension is known for
*Turns remain brisk throughout the game
*New mechanics are simple, elegant, and challenge players to rethink traditional strategies

Cons:
*Vigil doesn’t actually rise all that much
*Powerful cards can still make the game seem swingy

This review originally appeared on www.islaythedragon.com.
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Jason Mosley
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Do you think this would be a good set to start with? Or is Strom of Souls still the best option right now?
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Andrew Brooks
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Mosley wrote:
Do you think this would be a good set to start with? Or is Strom of Souls still the best option right now?


I think that Rise of Vigil has a number of advantages as an entry point over Storm of Souls.

Storm of Souls and Rise of Vigil both introduce new mechanics to the formula developed in Chronicle of the Godslayer. Storm of Souls has Events/Fanatic and Trophy Monsters. Rise of Vigil has Energy and Energize abilities (it also has Trophy Monsters but they deal exclusively with Energy). From a teachability standpoint I think that explaining Energy is easier than teaching Events. I also think that the board in Rise of Vigil is a little cleaner, with less information to take in and remember (without the Events and Fanatic). I'm not saying that the Energy mechanic is better than the Events mechanic but I do think that it's an easier concept to grasp thus making it a better entry point. Others may disagree with me on this point, I've only taught it to a couple people so my sample size is not very large.

The other thing to consider, which I mentioned in my review, is that in my experience the turns tend to be quicker in Rise of Vigil, especially near the end of the game. This isn't significant but I think it creates a better experience for teaching the game. I'd actually be curious if others agree with me on this point.
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Teaching the game is not the issue. I am just looking for a good game to play. We played the orignal and I have the ipad version.

The quicker turns does sound like a plus.
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Mosley wrote:
Teaching the game is not the issue. I am just looking for a good game to play. We played the orignal and I have the ipad version.

The quicker turns does sound like a plus.


Teaching aside I think I would still recommend this set over Storm of Souls. Not to a significant degree but I think it is slightly more streamlined.

The nice thing about Storm of Souls is that it has an expansion so if you include Immortal Heroes then the card mix is more varied and interesting. The expansions generally includes more complicated cards so if you want to pick up something like that right away then Storm of Souls definitely has an edge.
 
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Thanks for the help
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My experiences haven't been wonderful with Rise of Vigil. I really want to like it, but we've had a number of game end up with the Heavy Infantry or Mystic deck running out because of two of the things you mention: high cost cards and decreased ability to banish/card draw.

So we get hands full of junk because we can't banish our start cards and a tableau full of cards we can't kill/acquire and no way to banish them, either. I've only had that happen a couple of times out of hundreds of games played of the other sets. It's a regular occurrence with Vigil.

I will probably start adding a few cards from the other sets to resolve this.

Great review, though, thanks!
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seqiro wrote:
My experiences haven't been wonderful with Rise of Vigil. I really want to like it, but we've had a number of game end up with the Heavy Infantry or Mystic deck running out because of two of the things you mention: high cost cards and decreased ability to banish/card draw.

So we get hands full of junk because we can't banish our start cards and a tableau full of cards we can't kill/acquire and no way to banish them, either. I've only had that happen a couple of times out of hundreds of games played of the other sets. It's a regular occurrence with Vigil.

I will probably start adding a few cards from the other sets to resolve this.

Great review, though, thanks!


That's really interesting, perhaps I haven't run into an initial state that has caused the Center Row to get clogged but I've found that they compensated nicely for the lack of banishing/card draw by having some pretty super powered Energize abilities. There are a number of cards that can straight up acquire/kill anything and plenty of Rune (lifebound) and Power (void) specialization. Plus the enlightened heroes in this set are super flexible and can let you take a hybrid approach and still hit the 5+ mark. In the games that I've played so far I have not even come close to emptying either the Mystic or Heavy Infantry piles.

I'm not trying to say that you're playing it wrong, just that I have had a drastically different experience so far.

I will say that I had a couple games where the monsters threatened to take over the center row and in the very first game I saw Oziah clear out an entire row of monsters. I do think that it's easy to ignore power until the monsters start showing up at which point it's hard to switch gears (and then they do clog things up). However, the mere fact that Oziah exists in this set should be a strong incentive to NOT ignore power.

I hope this set grows on you. I do agree that the absence of center row banishers is a little odd and would actually be one of my main complaints that I left out of the review. I do have faith that they balanced the set well and actually haven't found their absence to be a problem yet, I just personally like them and the control they provide.
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Bought this recently and so far my issue is RUNAWAY LEADER! I've had a few games now where someone gets a few early energy shards and just crushes everyone. Doesn't make for a good game experience.
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skyzero wrote:
Bought this recently and so far my issue is RUNAWAY LEADER! I've had a few games now where someone gets a few early energy shards and just crushes everyone. Doesn't make for a good game experience.


Yeah we have had this problem too. Again for us it came down to the fact that there are so few cards that banish other cards. If only one person manages to get one, they get a big advantage since their deck is better streamlined.

Another issue we found was that some of the Energize costs for constructs seemed a little unbalanced relative to others. For example, Portabillet has an Energize 5 ability of "Once this turn, draw a card", while Tablet of the Dreamer has an Energize 4 ability of "Once this turn, acquire defeat any card in the center row without paying its cost". So I could achieve 5 energy and get the power of an Arha Initiate while my opponent could achieve 4 energy and get the power of Adayu.



Even Ogo Demontrap's Energize 4 ability of "Once this turn, gain (3 Honor)" proved more useful in one game we played.

We've actually never had one Fate trigger yet.

I'm not writing the game off yet, as I really like a lot of the cards and the new mechanics, but so far everyone in my group would rather play SoS/IH than this.
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skyzero wrote:
Bought this recently and so far my issue is RUNAWAY LEADER! I've had a few games now where someone gets a few early energy shards and just crushes everyone. Doesn't make for a good game experience.


I'd like to think that Rise of Vigil is on par with the other blocks in terms of how badly someone can run away with the game given the right set of cards out of the gate. The presence of Energy Shards seems like it might skew things a little to making this worse in RoV but I'm not entirely convinced of this yet. Energy Shards are generally prevalent enough that other players should have a shot at catching back up before the player with the early Energy advantage runs away with it. Frankly, I'd be more concerned about exclusive early banishing just like in the other sets.

seqiro wrote:
Another issue we found was that some of the Energize costs for constructs seemed a little unbalanced relative to others. For example, Portabillet has an Energize 5 ability of "Once this turn, draw a card", while Tablet of the Dreamer has an Energize 4 ability of "Once this turn, acquire defeat any card in the center row without paying its cost". So I could achieve 5 energy and get the power of an Arha Initiate while my opponent could achieve 4 energy and get the power of Adayu.



Even Ogo Demontrap's Energize 4 ability of "Once this turn, gain (3 Honor)" proved more useful in one game we played.


Keep in mind that Portabillet's "draw a card" Energize ability is actually equivalent to Monk of the Lidless Eye's "draw two cards" ability since it's a construct. Given the lack of card draw in this set that can actually be quite useful. I did find it odd that it's Energize cost is higher than Tablet of the Dreamer but it is Mechana (useful for triggering other Mechana constructs' abilities), has an additional ability, and is worth 5 points.
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dotKeller wrote:

Keep in mind that Portabillet's "draw a card" Energize ability is actually equivalent to Monk of the Lidless Eye's "draw two cards" ability since it's a construct. Given the lack of card draw in this set that can actually be quite useful. I did find it odd that it's Energize cost is higher than Tablet of the Dreamer but it is Mechana (useful for triggering other Mechana constructs' abilities), has an additional ability, and is worth 5 points.


Yeah I know Portabillet also has the Burrower's ability, but without the cards from previous sets that let you discard constructs (like Cog Maw) and pull them back (like Brazer Drone) or that let you return a construct to your hand (Dream Machine), Portabillet's standard power is pretty weak. Especially since without card banishing to thin your deck, it takes so long for constructs to even show up after being acquired or destroyed.

With the randomness of Ascension, you can never plan to use any one strategy but in all of the other sets I can usually get something good going with Mechana, even if it's just a couple of them. In this set, without a LOT of Mechana (especially Omnicron) I just find it a very weak option.

I'm going to give it some more plays as is and if we still don't love it, I'll start adding a few cards from the other sets.
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I stopped buying Ascension expansions because it just made no sense to me that I have such a massive, diluted stack of center cards. I had never, until reading this review, heard of the notion that there were blocks and expansions meant to go with them. Mine are all mashed together which, obviously, is wrong (?). The whole thing started to feel like its reach exceeded its grasp.

Thanks for this. Now I can separate out my expos, get the game back to the table and resume my buying for this series.
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Pellbort wrote:
Mine are all mashed together which, obviously, is wrong (?)


It's not wrong.

Its a different style of play.

We like playing everything all together. I have friends who only play blocks.

Whatever works with you - the game is customizable to your tastes that way.
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Great review!
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Good review!

Paul:
Quote:
I really want to like it, but we've had a number of game end up with the Heavy Infantry or Mystic deck running out because of two of the things you mention: high cost cards and decreased ability to banish/card draw.


I wonder if you ran into the same problem I just did, Paul. No where in the rules is this stated, and we ignored the symbol. When you play an Energy Shard, you actually draw a card from your deck. Played my first two games with this set today, and we didn't do that. Those two games played out exactly as how you described. I was all set to bitch about this set until I read in another post about this.

I believe the draw from Energy Shards will minimize a lot of the problems I saw.

I have played hundreds of games of SoS and IH, and there are clear strategies to go with. I don't see any of that in this set, and it appears at first glance to be too generic with no clear faction abilities. It would be like playing a red deck in Magic without any direct damage. Sure, you can do it, but you are ignoring the main point of playing red.

I like that each faction has its own flavor...Void - banish, Lifebound - unite, Enlightened - draw/sift. I didn't feel any real difference here.

Of course I have to play using the correct rules now, so we shall see how it plays for real tomorrow.
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hughthehand wrote:
Good review!

Paul:
Quote:
I really want to like it, but we've had a number of game end up with the Heavy Infantry or Mystic deck running out because of two of the things you mention: high cost cards and decreased ability to banish/card draw.


I wonder if you ran into the same problem I just did, Paul. No where in the rules is this stated, and we ignored the symbol. When you play an Energy Shard, you actually draw a card from your deck. Played my first two games with this set today, and we didn't do that. Those two games played out exactly as how you described. I was all set to bitch about this set until I read in another post about this.

I believe the draw from Energy Shards will minimize a lot of the problems I saw.

I have played hundreds of games of SoS and IH, and there are clear strategies to go with. I don't see any of that in this set, and it appears at first glance to be too generic with no clear faction abilities. It would be like playing a red deck in Magic without any direct damage. Sure, you can do it, but you are ignoring the main point of playing red.

I like that each faction has its own flavor...Void - banish, Lifebound - unite, Enlightened - draw/sift. I didn't feel any real difference here.

Of course I have to play using the correct rules now, so we shall see how it plays for real tomorrow.


Nope, we were following the rules, but thanks for checking.

We tried playing a few more time with different people and no one liked this expansion. So I'll probably find it a new home.
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