Lincoln Damerst
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This week on Episode 11 of GameNight! we have Nikki, Aaron, Dave and Lincoln play Article 27: The UN Security Council Game from Dan Baden and Stronghold Games.



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Scott Alden
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This is a pretty intriguing game for the amount of time spent - I love the end of game discussion.
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Stephen Buonocore
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Thanks for doing the BGG Game Night on ARTICLE 27!

As Aldie said, great end-game discussion. For such a simple, pure negotiation game, there are many paths to victory.

In the end, it's all about how much you can influence your opponents to do things that you want them to do, even to the point of taking bribes from them for things YOU really want to happen anyway!

Thanks,
Stephen M. Buonocore
Stronghold Games LLC

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Adam Kunsemiller
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evilone wrote:
Thanks for doing the BGG Game Night on ARTICLE 27!

As Aldie said, great end-game discussion. For such a simple, pure negotiation game, there are many paths to victory.

In the end, it's all about how much you can influence your opponents to do things that you want them to do, even to the point of taking bribes from them for things YOU really want to happen anyway!

Thanks,
Stephen M. Buonocore
Stronghold Games LLC



One of the things I enjoyed most about this game was posturing as if I didn't like a deal at all and having other players all pay me one or two to vote yes, or to not veto, rack in those VPs, and then end up scoring well anyways, since it wasn't that bad of a deal for me. It's not something you can always do, but that's a great aspect of this game; that you can give off the impression of liking or not liking a deal in order to attract bribes even though the deal may be perfect for you, etc. You can even do well threatening to abstain, since it is a more real threat (players know you can do so without costing yourself 5vps.)
 
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Jasper Birch
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Awesome French accent Aaron...especially funny when you say 'gesundheit' which is German.

Anyways, the theme of this game would usually not be something that would really strike me (not too much into realistically political themed games, would be more fun for my feeling if it was something post-apocalyptic politics with real countries or maybe something Star Wars galaxy stylish crazy powers), but this game looks really interesting and fun. Within 5 minutes I heard the terms negotiating, bribing and backstabbing, so you got my interest there right away!

Will definitely keep my eye out for this game!
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Mark Johnson
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Best end-of-game discussion yet. Makes me want to try the game. (Well, that and its short duration.)
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Jim Cote
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Can the secretary general end the round suddenly, locking bribes in their current state? If so, this seems a little extreme. For example, you may have a bribe of 3 to include red. Another player bribes 3 to include black. You quickly accept and bang the gavel. Does the player with the first bribe have any chance to take his bribe back at that point?
 
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Kevin Eastwood
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No the round is over when the gavel drops or time is out. If somrone doesn't like the vote they can always veto and when you offer the bribe you can make it conditional to have a certain color out of the vote- really anything is negotiable. The balance is good but is dependent on the skills of the players. This is definitely a game worth trying and I'd recommend a few plays through to get used to what the appropriate bribe amounts are (and besides it's a short game).
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Adam Kunsemiller
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ekted wrote:
Can the secretary general end the round suddenly, locking bribes in their current state? If so, this seems a little extreme. For example, you may have a bribe of 3 to include red. Another player bribes 3 to include black. You quickly accept and bang the gavel. Does the player with the first bribe have any chance to take his bribe back at that point?


The thing to keep in mind in your example is that everyone that had placed a bribe got what they had asked for. If one player had really wanted something along the lines of "I'll pay you three as long as you include red and don't include black" then that would be one of those special cases that you denote elsewhere. No matter what happens, people only lose their "bribe" money if what they asked for with the bribe is what happened.
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Stephen Buonocore
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rhitmojo wrote:
ekted wrote:
Can the secretary general end the round suddenly, locking bribes in their current state? If so, this seems a little extreme. For example, you may have a bribe of 3 to include red. Another player bribes 3 to include black. You quickly accept and bang the gavel. Does the player with the first bribe have any chance to take his bribe back at that point?


The thing to keep in mind in your example is that everyone that had placed a bribe got what they had asked for. If one player had really wanted something along the lines of "I'll pay you three as long as you include red and don't include black" then that would be one of those special cases that you denote elsewhere. No matter what happens, people only lose their "bribe" money if what they asked for with the bribe is what happened.



Jim is exactly right. The game is actually *not* about backstabbing. It is about negotiation... pure negotiation.

If you Bride to have RED in, and the Secretary General does just that, he or she keeps that Bribe. If you don't like the final Proposal on the Floor once the Gravel is struck, you should likely Abstain (hoping the Vote will not carry), or if it *really* is bad for you (like he or she tossed in Black that will now yield you NEGATIVE 6 (the max negative that one color can hurt you), VETO'ing is your likely, best option (which costs you 5 Influence to do, but... worth it, possibly, since everyone else will benefit so much, and you're getting hosed....

Thanks,
Stephen M. Buonocore
Stronghold Games LLC


[Note: all of the capitalized terms above are game terms. The game seamlessly uses these terms. And while you probably won't think you are dealing with Nuclear Arms Proliferation proposals (Red) or Diplomatic Sanctions (Black), you will get into the feel of negotiating for Influence, as you Abstain, vote For, or Veto the Proposals that are on the Floor or have been Tabled.)
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Dan Baden
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The comment about why you would bribe someone else to veto is correct. I've seen several times where two people share the cost of a veto by one bribing the other, thereby also avoiding the painful situation where both veto the proposal. This works well in a 5 or 6 player game where two people could be over-ruled by the others if they just abstain. In a 4 player game, if both abstain, you get the same effect as sharing a veto, but for no cost.

Once people start playing this way, it opens up another dimension of subterfuge for the one who accepts the bribe may actually want the proposal to pass and by accepting a bribe to veto it and not doing so, likely prevents the other from casting their own veto, thus helping it pass...
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Ralph T
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Article 27 is underrated. It has to do with the fact it is a heavy filler. Given its size and production, people (including myself) expect a balanced gaming experience even though the game length is about 8 minutes a player.

As for the video I think your rule explanations tend to go on for too long. In my experience this game can be explained in ten minutes or less and any longer is too long for this heavy-filler. Perhaps others should not ask questions during the teaching time. I felt the same with the other video of this series that I watched for Qin. Just trying to be constructive. Great video production for a short interactive game that is great with four to six.
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