Recommend
18 
 Thumb up
 Hide
3 Posts

Code 777» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A Year With Code 777 rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
United States
Redford
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I remember being at one of my monthly meetup groups, and before one of the guys I was playing games with had to leave, he wanted us to try one last game of his, which ended up being Code 777.

Other than Clue, it was really unlike anything I had ever played up to that point, and I really enjoyed it. I put it on my wishlist and kept it in the back of my mind, but it didn't get added to an order until almost a year later.

I've now owned the game for a year, and played it 8 times so far.

The Premise:
This is a themeless deduction game, so there really is no presmise story-wise. Everyone is trying to figure out their own 3 digit code that they can't see.

The Components:
I have the Stronghold 25th Anniversary Edition. This version comes with great components. The plastic number tiles are thick and pretty large, and the plastic tile holders are well made. One good thing about this design is that there is a shape that corresponds to all the colors used in this game, which makes it colorblind friendly.

A deck of cards includes the questions that will be asked throughout the game, as well as some reference cards which show the entire set of tiles.

A notepad full of double-sided sheets is also included.

The Gameplay:
The rules to this game are pretty simple. Everyone gets a tile holder and places three tiles in it without looking at them. This way, everyone can see everyone elses tiles, but cannot see their own. The goal is to guess the three numbers on the tiles in front of them.

There are a total of 28 tiles. The distribution of these tiles is one 1, two 2s, three 3s, and so on up to seven 7s. Each number is a certain color (which includes a corresponding shape), with seven different colors appearing four times each. Some colors are only associated with one number, others are associated across two numbers. When guessing the numbers in front of you, you do not need to know what color they are as well, the colors are only used to help eliminate numbers you don't have. The order of the numbers in front of you is also not important.

In player order, players will draw a card and read the question aloud. That player must then answer the question truthfully. Using this answer, the players can try to start eliminating the tiles they don't have, in order to figure out which ones they do have. This is done by taking the answer and applying it across the tiles you know that the answerer can see. As a real basic example, the question could be "Do you see more red numbers or blue numbers?". Say the answer given is blue. Now you look at the other players tiles, and say you do not see any red or blue numbers. Since they don't have any, but blue was seen more by the answerer (keeping in mind he can't see his own tiles), then you know you have at least one blue tile, which helps narrow down what you have.

This goes on and on, until a player decides they have enough information to make a guess. A player can guess at any time, and does not need to wait for their own turn. If the player is correct, that player gets a point and is allowed to look at the tiles they had, which he can write down to eliminate them from their next set of tiles. If a player is wrong, they are not allowed to look at them. Either way, the tiles are set aside, and new ones are drawn from the pool of tiles. Once the pool only has a certain number remaining, the set aside tiles are mixed back in to form a new pool.

The player that has guessed their tiles correctly three times (gotten three points) wins the game.

Final Thoughts:
This game definitely fulfills the part of my brain that enjoys puzzles. Especially since some of the questions and deductions are mathematical in nature. So knowing this may be a deciding factor on who will or won't like this game.

This game also allows some control over how difficult it is. I believe the original rules (and what I use) says that when the common pool is down to seven tiles, the set aside ones are mixed back in. This makes the game more difficult for everyone because tiles you have seen and eliminated may end up showing back up again, and you have to decide whether or not to ignore it when they are drawn, or else you may be eliminating a number twice that you shouldn't. You can lower the difficult by waiting for the common pool to go down to four or even one tile, which allows you to see more before they are mixed back in.

The game can be frustrating at times, even for those that enjoy this type of puzzling. There are 23 questions, but depending on how much you've already eliminated, some questions will just be giving you redundant information. It gets annoying when you are waiting for that one last clue, and none of the questions you hear are helpful. And then you end up drawing the one you needed, which doesn't help you at all, since the reader never learns information on the questions they read. This type of stuff doesn't happen too often, but when it does, and you're anticipating that one last clue, it can seem like it's been happening forever.

Overall, I find this to be a fun game. It's themeless, and can be pretty quick, depending on how good the players are, so it's not going to be a main event at game night. But it is a nice diversion and gets the motors spinning. Following the BGG guidelines, I give this one a solid 8.

Thanks for checking out my review, and if you want to read more, you can find my other reviews at A Year With My Games.
12 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marky Mark
Canada
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Cool, sounds like a multi-player logic puzzle. Thanks for the review.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Redford
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
4100xpb wrote:
Cool, sounds like a multi-player logic puzzle. Thanks for the review.


Yes, that sums it up almost precisely.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.