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Subject: Any Must Haves in a given deck? rss

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Brian Thomas
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I've never played MtG, or the original Netrunner.

So the question then becomes how to build a deck, what are the motivations behind each identity, and what cards are must haves. I'm sure there will probably be plenty of debate on some, but I figure there may be some consensus, at least on the motivations and philosophy of identies...

I am not looking full deck builds (though if people want to link to good decks for new players to use, and explain the motivation and ideas of the deck, feel free, but just linking to a deck doesn't help if I don't understand the why/how of the deck...and I've got all the expansions to date), but the basics of what should I be thinking about when building a deck.

The primary point is the philosophy and motivations behind the identies and the must haves of those ones...

Corporation
-d10-1Must have cards in all Corp Decks (set card is from), briefly why
--d10-2Company
---d10-3General philosophy of company
---d10-3Must have cards for that company (set card is from) (splash cost), briefly why
---d10-3Identity
----d10-4General philosophy of specific identity
----d10-4Must have cards for that identity (set card is from) (splash cost), breifly why
Runner
-d10-1Must have cards for all Runner decks (set card is from)
--d10-2Runner factions
---d10-3General philosphy of that faction
---d10-3Must have cards for that faction (set card is from) (splash cost), breifly why
---d10-3Identities
----d10-4General philosphy of that specific identity
----d10-4Must have cards for that identity (set card is from) (splash cost), breifly why


I posted this over on my personal webpage, but I didn't want to spam it since it has ads and Amazon links on the page, and the above is the question portion past the intro for others which is all that is really needed for here... just noting in case anyone saw a Twitter or G+ link with a #Netrunner hashtag to a blog post with the same question.
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Robin Lees
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I'm just about to start building decks, and I have a similar question, I'd like to know the strategies, and mechanics behind each of the 4 corps, and 3 runners.
I have asked around, and so far the consensus seems to be either whatever you build, or based around the ability on the identity card.
 
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Martin Presley
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There are no must-have cards for every single deck, though I do think Sure Gamble is great for any runner not using Magnum Opus, and Ice Wall is an incredibly efficient piece of ICE, if you have three influence to spare.

This is a summary I made for an earlier thread, and a lot of people seemed to agree with it, so I'm reposting it here. I'm also not going to make a comprehensive list of key cards for each faction and each identity, since there is no objective answer, and is really something you should figure out for yourself. It'll make you a stronger player in the long run.

Please note that these are generalizations, meant as jumping-off points rather than rules.

RUNNERS

Shapers: They favor a straight-forward gameplan with a powerful, reliable economy and solid breakers. They are very strong late-game, and can hack through any remote server, as well as make big R&D runs. They commonly spend influence for cards that will let them threaten HQ and/or Archives, or for cards to further increase their efficiency.

Criminals: Their gameplan revolves around a highly event-driven deck to keep themselves rich and the corporation poor. They are best in the early game, and can play very pressure-oriented out of the gate, draining the corp of money before their defenses are up. They look out of faction for efficient breakers, card draw, and either a way to further weaken the corp early game, or improve their economy late game.

Anarchs: Anarchs are all about big effects with big consequences. They have the best card draw, to assemble their menagerie of synergistic programs. Their decks tend to be focused on flexibility and opportunism, or on building a rig tooled for a single, game-winning turn. Including at least one copy of the Shaper's card Aesop Pawnshop is almost mandatory, to have the option of turning off Wyldside. Most other influence is spent on adding cards to unbalance the corporation or support their build.

CORPORATIONS

Weyland: Old-school corporate evil, their cards have powerful effects which can give them tons of money, or devastate the runner. Weyland will do anything to cripple or kill the runner, including sacrificing their own agendas and public image. They often import powerful ICE from other corporations, as well as new ways of tagging or trapping the runner.

NBN: This faction is all about speed and economics. They have many cheap pieces of ICE that don't end the run, but make further runs prohibitively costly. They have many ways to give and use tags, which can slow the runner down or speed up their own agendas. They'll need to go out of faction for much ETR ICE, as well as for ways to accelerate their economy.

Jinteki: Jinteki, more than anyone else, plays a psychological game. They have the most traps, some deadly ICE at a low cost, and can score many of their agendas rapidly if the runner gets too paranoid to run. They often go out of faction for economy cards, as well as additional painful ICE and ugly surprises.

Haas-Bioroid: Strong ICE, paired with a powerful, steady economy means running against Haas is like laying siege to a fortress. They can build up their ICE rapidly with Accelerated Beta Test, and can either use this to create a monolithic mega-server, or create a more horizontal layout to protect economic assets. They often import even more strong ICE, as their economy and agendas can support an unparalleled level of static defense.
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Lou Lessing
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Sure, I'll go. This is all really simplified, because OP said he was new to the deckbuilding aspects of this game. This isn't in any way a detailed strategy guide.

Starting with the runners:

All runners need money. Some need more than others, but they all need it. They get it in different ways, though. Just look for in-faction cards that give credits, and always play Sure Gambles. Three copies in every deck, and you won't go wrong for a long while yet. Most runners also need card draw. Shapers play Diesel, Gabe usually splashes for Diesal, and Anarchs play Wyldside.

Kate needs Aesop's Pawnshop, a lot of cheap hardware, and an efficient breaker suite. Usually this involves things like Corroder, Ninja, and sometimes Special Order.

Gabe needs things that focus heavily on HQ to get the most out of his ability. Generally things like Sneakdoor Beta, Desperado, and Account Syphon. (I'd avoid Lemuria Codecracker.) Gabe also needs a lot of money and an efficient breaker suite, often including things like Peacock, Gordian Blade, and Corroder, and always including Special Order.

Noise needs viruses. Lots and lots of viruses to get lots and lots of Noise triggers. Crypsis, Parasite, and Datasucker (in no particular order) are the best viruses, although Imp, Medium, and Nerve Agent are all good.

Whizzard needs a lot of stuff. He really wants to run a lot of remote servers to take advantage of his ability, so Inside Job is a star, but he also needs efficient icebreakers and a lot of money. I've never actually built a Whizzard deck, so I'm just going off of what I've seen.

Chaos Theory needs money, card draw, search effects, and deck thinning. The point of the deck is to set up as quickly as possible, so a ton of redundancy is a good thing. Key cards are Magnum Opus, Special Order, Test Run, Personal Workshop, and a diverse icebreaker suite. (Mine is 1 each of Corroder, Yog.0, Gordian Blade, Battering Ram, Ninja, and Femme Fatale, plus one Nerve Agent, but you can tune yours to your liking. For instant, Yog's really only at it's best with Dinosaurus, which I chose to play in my Chaos list.)

I'll do the corps in a minute.
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Robin Lees
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Thanks Martin, that's exactly the type of overview I was looking for.
 
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Brian Thomas
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Thank you Martin and Lou, both helped answer my question... glad to see it was of help to others as well.
 
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Patrick Jamet
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Some advices irritate me...
Sure Gamble is overrated. My decks are better since I stopped playing them.
If you can afford to pay 5 for 4, and you have some remaining influence, you can play Liberated Account, or Bank Job, or Compromised Employee, or Cyberfeeder, or many others.
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Martin Presley
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Pyjam wrote:
Some advices irritate me...
Sure Gamble is overrated. My decks are better since I stopped playing them.
If you can afford to pay 5 for 4, and you have some remaining influence, you can play Liberated Account, or Bank Job, or Compromised Employee, or Cyberfeeder, or many others.


Fair enough; I've found it very useful to have some burst economy, but it all depends on what you're playing. Like I said, this is all meant as a jumping off point for beginners, rather than hard rules.
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Bill Irons
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the closest thing to auto include for me is corroder. Even then, snowball is a great substitute for shaper.

 
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Matthew Gagan
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Pyjam wrote:
Some advices irritate me...
Sure Gamble is overrated. My decks are better since I stopped playing them.
If you can afford to pay 5 for 4, and you have some remaining influence, you can play Liberated Account, or Bank Job, or Compromised Employee, or Cyberfeeder, or many others.


Sure. And you want all of those as well. There is nothing amiss with a Criminal deck, for example, playing Account Syphon, Bank Job, Easy Mark AND Sure Gamble.

An Anarch deck with 3 Liberated Accounts and 2-3 Cyberfeeders hasn't likely taken a wrong turn by including 3 Sure Gambles.

I think there's an argument to be made for leaving Sure Gamble/Hedge Fund out of decks, but I don't think it's anywhere near so clear cut as to be irritating, especially as offered to someone who's asking for basic advice.
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Steven Tu
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Pyjam wrote:
Some advices irritate me...
Sure Gamble is overrated. My decks are better since I stopped playing them.
If you can afford to pay 5 for 4, and you have some remaining influence, you can play Liberated Account, or Bank Job, or Compromised Employee, or Cyberfeeder, or many others.


MOST decks I make don't have "remaining influence", so I'm "forced" to take non-faction economy does that make me a terrible deckbuilder?
 
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Lluluien
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I think maybe the way I would prefer to answer this to someone that's new to deckbuilding is to just give you important cards I think you should look at in combination together to kind of give you a way to direct your thoughts. As a couple of people have said, I don't think there are cards that are automatic includes for any faction, but I do think there are cards that, by including them, help direct your deckbuilding.


I'll just do Corp; there are tons of people here way more qualified to do Runner here than I am, and you got Runner info from one of them already

Blanket disclaimer here that none of these will necessarily arrive you at whatever people are arguing is the "best" deck at the moment, but to preclude the inevitable follow-on posts saying so: that's NOT the point. What IS the point is that looking through these sets of cards with the intent to build the deck around them will give you a good sort of tutorial path for exposing yourself to a wide sampling of the evolution of thought that has developed over the life of the game so far.


Weyland: Scorched Earth, Power Grid Overload (for countering Plascrete Carapace, which counters Scorched Earth), SEA Source, Posted Bounty and tagging ICE (Data Raven, Draco, Shadow, in particular)

Weyland: Ice Wall, Hadrian's Wall, Shadow, Commercialization

Weyland: Priority Requisition, Oversight AI, Janus, Archer



Haas-Bio: Biotic Labor, Project Vitruvius, Archived Memories, and Melange Mining Corporation

Haas-Bio: Accelerated Beta Test, Priority Requisition, Archer, Janus, Oversight AI

Haas-Bio: Ice Wall, Aggressive Secretary, Biotic Labor, Project Vitruvius, Trick of Light



NBN: Breaking News, SEA Source, Ghost Branch, Scorched Earth, Private Security Force, tagging ICE (Data Raven, Draco, Matrix Analyzer)

NBN: Astroscript Pilot Program, SanSan City Grid, Biotic Labor, high trash cost economy (PAD Campaign, Marked Accounts, Private Contracts)

NBN: Astroscript Pilot Program, SanSan City Grid, Ice Wall, Shadow, Trick of Light

NBN: Private Security Force, Edge of World, Data Raven, Snare, high trash cost economy (PAD Campaign, Marked Accounts, Private Contracts)



Jinteki: Personal Evolution identity, Fetal AI, Project Junebug, Neural EMP

Jinteki: Replicating Perfection identity, click-draining or run control ICE (Enigma, Hourglass, Ichi, Uroboros), lots of assets (Melange Mining Corp, PAD Campaign, Marked Accounts, Project Junebug, Aggressive Secretary, etc.)


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Patrick Jamet
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Tuism wrote:
MOST decks I make don't have "remaining influence", so I'm "forced" to take non-faction economy does that make me a terrible deckbuilder?

Absolutely! I'm a terrible deck builder myself. I have never enough place for Sure Gamble (that card that gives you a little more money when you already have money).

Seriously, It's not like if we are still playing with a double coreset only.

If I should give a basic advice : include Armitage Codebusting in every Runner deck (Although my brand new Andromeda deck doesn't include them.). That card gives a lot of money when you don't have money.

And Katie Jones is coming...!
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Steven Tu
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Pyjam wrote:
Tuism wrote:
MOST decks I make don't have "remaining influence", so I'm "forced" to take non-faction economy does that make me a terrible deckbuilder?

Absolutely! I'm a terrible deck builder myself. I have never enough place for Sure Gamble (that card that gives you a little more money when you already have money).

Seriously, It's not like if we are still playing with a double coreset only.

If I should give a basic advice : include Armitage Codebusting in every Runner deck (Although my brand new Andromeda deck doesn't include them.). That card gives a lot of money when you don't have money.

And Katie Jones is coming...!


Actually, armitage gives you 1 over sure gamble overall.

Armitage = 1 install click + 1 cred + 6 clicks = 8, return 12 = 4 profit.
Sure gamble = 1 play click + 5 cost = 6, return 9 = 3 profit.

So, do you wanna burst or do you want to take longer to realize 1 more? Depends on your strategy
 
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Patrick Jamet
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Tuism wrote:
So, do you wanna burst or do you want to take longer to realize 1 more? Depends on your strategy

My know my maths.
My strategy is that I want more credits and more flexibility.
 
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Steven Tu
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Pyjam wrote:
Tuism wrote:
So, do you wanna burst or do you want to take longer to realize 1 more? Depends on your strategy

My know my maths.
My strategy is that I want more credits and more flexibility.


Well I thought about it, sure gamble gives you more clicks to do stuff with, which means you can dig deeper into your deck given the same time, which means that given the same click frame, you might get more cards and more creds and more tricks.

Hmmmmmmmmm.
 
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Patrick Jamet
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It's only true when you have enough credits to play Sure Gamble.
 
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Steven Tu
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Pyjam wrote:
It's only true when you have enough credits to play Sure Gamble.


Well, the clicks you took to go from 0 to 5 (if you're indeed starting from 5, often you're not) is the same clicks you're taking to take each pair from armitage.

So, which strategy favors sure gamble, and which favours armitage? Armitage can't be the best fit in all decks.
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Patrick Jamet
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OK. I took some time to play with a spreadsheet.

Armitage is only better when you have 0 or 1 credit and you need 12 or more credits.

When you have 2-5 credits, and you want 8-12, Sure Gamble is significantly better.

You were right. Thank you.
 
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Steven Tu
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Pyjam wrote:
OK. I took some time to play with a spreadsheet.

Armitage is only better when you have 0 or 1 credit and you need 12 or more credits.

When you have 2-5 credits, and you want 8-12, Sure Gamble is significantly better.

You were right. Thank you.


I guess that's a pretty straightforward way of looking at it, I was still wondering how this nuance between the two translates to actual deck strategies...

Like, an event driven criminal deck that often fluctuates in cash wildly likes sure gamble (especially because he ends runs with money, even if he went broke doing the run), while noise decks like armitage cos it simply gives 1 more and noise is often broke? (That and aesops, of course)

Or can we just say if you don't aesops then you go sure gamble?
 
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Jack Keys
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Tuism wrote:
Pyjam wrote:
OK. I took some time to play with a spreadsheet.

Armitage is only better when you have 0 or 1 credit and you need 12 or more credits.

When you have 2-5 credits, and you want 8-12, Sure Gamble is significantly better.

You were right. Thank you.


I guess that's a pretty straightforward way of looking at it, I was still wondering how this nuance between the two translates to actual deck strategies...

Like, an event driven criminal deck that often fluctuates in cash wildly likes sure gamble (especially because he ends runs with money, even if he went broke doing the run), while noise decks like armitage cos it simply gives 1 more and noise is often broke? (That and aesops, of course)

Or can we just say if you don't aesops then you go sure gamble?


I've been trying to figure this out, too.

I've found that Sure Gamble is better in decks that use Wyldside, since you have fewer clicks in a turn, and Sure Gamble ends up giving you four credits for half a click, essentially. However, it's a one-time burst, so you need something else to be more sustainable.

I think Armitage Codebusting ends up working well when your deck is often low on credits, as you mentioned. It's also pretty good when you have a good recurring credit economy, since all you need are little boosts here and there to help augment your recurring credits.

That's about as far as I've gotten at this point. I'm still trying to figure out exactly which decks each of these belong in.
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Patrick Jamet
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skiesbleed wrote:
I think Armitage Codebusting ends up working well when your deck is often low on credits, as you mentioned. It's also pretty good when you have a good recurring credit economy, since all you need are little boosts here and there to help augment your recurring credits.

Yes, I often play like this, with Cyberfeeder and Compromised Employee. I like recurring credits.

Although...

I've started playing Andromeda + Access to Globalsex + Underworld Contact + Mr. Li (). With all this, it's easy to gain 2 recurring credits at the begining of each turn (or at least 1). So, I think Sure Gamble is a better option in this context.
 
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