GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!
8,896 Supporters
$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
19 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
11 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Wrong Chemistry» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Wrong Chemistry, a review rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
costa
Portugal
Vieira de Leiria
Leiria
flag msg tools
designer
YINZI
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Last year i came across WRONG CHEMISTRY, a nice little puzzle game published by MAGE COMPANY and designed by Tony Cimino. In this game, players will be mad scientists attempting to manipulate molecules in order to create new elements that will match those they secretly have in their hands and with this, score them.
The gameplay is very straight forward, each player will get a hand of cards and on thei're turn they can perform 4 actions:
- Remove a disc from any hex to the supply;
- Place a disc from the supply onto any empty hex;
- Move a disc from any hex to any empty hex;
- Move a empty yellow hex;
- Use a card from your hand;
- or use "Restartium" to reset the molecule to it's original configuration.

What's expected here is optmization. Use the best way you can all these actions to score in one turn the most cards possible. After your turn you will refill again your hand up to 3 cards and repeat everything all over again.

The game is fast paced, fluid and with lot's of fun, with players trying to achieve the best score possible and at the same time trying to alter the molecule to such extent that it will be hard for the other players to score. Screwage and optimization are the key words in this game.

I can see this one beeing used by teachers to try to grab students into chemistry

It can be played from 2 to 4 players, but i prefer the lesser crowd because it makes the game a bit more tactical.

Wrapping it up, it's a fun game, for me it's a filler with a puzzle aspect to it that appeals to me. Also, from what i've seen it's wife-friendly
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
MAGE Company
msg tools
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The campaign for Wrong Chemistry has been launched: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/magecompany/wrong-chemis...

New artwork, rules, variants... you will find a little "mad" gameplay!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
MAGE Company
msg tools
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Original Conception of Wrong Chemistry!
From the designer of the game: Tony Cimino
N/A


LIVE FROM ESSEN - BGG BOOTH 2012 - WRONG CHEMISTRY PRESENTATION

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=p9CkM...


Enjoy It!

Original Conception of Wrong Chemistry
One day as I was arranging some extra hexes on a configuration reminiscent of a flower (actually it was the Benzene hydrocarbonate, but I am trying to be romantic) an idea came to mind. I could make a new game out of this. Chemistry and patterns on a puzzle game. It was organic chemistry in the beginning (remember Benzene?) but things took a different turn. But, let's take things from square one (or should I say hex one?). First, I must say that for the last few years I have been working in a café with over 400 board games on its shelves. My job there is to explain the games, and after having seen and played so many board games professionally, there is a time in a man's mind when the receptive becomes creative: "Hey, why don't I make a game of my own!"At the time I had this thought, I had already gathered piles of junk on every shelf and in every drawer in my house, that junk being game components, or anything that looked like a game component, or those extra things in board games that you usually send on for recycling. You know, those cardboard sheets that remain after you punch out all the game markers and tokens, the sheets you throw away? I'm the guy who makes a collection out of them. So, here I was playing with my junk and thinking about designing a game. I didn't want to make just a puzzle-pattern-building/matching-game. The fun/humour/pun should be added to a game like this. And the puns in the names of the cards were added to give this game a funny pitch.

Expand Your Lab:
Or The Complete Periodic Table Expansion, as I like to call it. Since Wrong Chemistry got the green light on kickstarter, after a while, its expansion got the green light as well from the publishing company ! The matter is simple: the basic game includes 52 elements. Right now, there are 118 elements on the Periodic Table. So, that leaves me with 66 more elements for the Wrong Chemistry: Expand Your Lab. What I like here, is the fact that the expansion of W.C. is gonna have more cards than the basic game. As a gamer, I find this really intriguing and I am glad that my publisher helped to make this true. Even though the game's expansion is months away from its release, I am still anxious. There are many thoughts about adding more quirks and smart but simple mechanisms to take the game to the next level. The question is simple: "How do I add more things to the game without making it tiresome for the players?" Of course anyone with a standard skill in math can tell you that there is a finite combination of configurations you can have with 7 hexes and some black and white discs. So, to make this more spicy, I had to add something. Spoiler alert: Wrong Chemistry's expansion is gonna provide player's with an extra action. That's means a new action that is not available in the base game. It's been fortunate that the hexes in the game where successfully printed with two different sides. That fact alone allows me to present a new aspect of the game, without a lot extra components. The new action allows a players to flip an empty hex to its other side. If the yellow side is facing up, you can flip it to its grey side and vice versa. Many of the new cards are associated with that rule. Configurations on the cards that worth 2,3 or 5 points (yes, 5 points cards are now included in the game) usually have grey hexes. That means at least a couple of hex flips will be necessary to score these new cards.

Making some rules an option:
Playing a game and adding rules after an expansion is released, can be tiresome for some players. I remember been glad while reading expansion rules from various games that have many "optional rules" in the rulebook. Personally, I like it when a game gives options in a way: "If you wanna play with this rule, go ahead. If you don't, no problem. Just play the game without that rule." The expansion of Wrong Chemistry is definitely gonna have one or two "optional rules", maybe more. Names on elements: When I had already completed the list of elements included in the base game, I felt lucky that I wanted to leave out all the big (100+) elements. Mostly because IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) around that time, announced two new names for elements 114 and 116. The formerly known Ununquadium and Ununhexium are now named Flerovium and Livermorium. IUPAC didn't inform me of the names changing and if I had gone through with the release of the game and had included either of the above elements in the game, I would have brought myself in a mighty fine predicament. Which brings me to the use of the term:

Living Card Game:
I am using this term only as a joke. The thing is that new elements might be discovered in the future, or the name of an element might change. So, I have discussed this with my publisher, and by the looks of things, if a new element is discovered or an element's name changes, we would have to print a new card for it, in order to keep W.C. up to date, hence this article's title. World's smallest Living card Game! Releasing one card every once in a while. Check IUPAC's program for more feedback! Also the game will feature two new non-existent elements: First, the element of surprise is a card created especially for players who can't wait for their turn to come and want to participate in the game always. That's what the element of surprise is for. It use is as follows: At the end of a player's turn, each other player, following playing order, may use the element of surprise and gain two actions. These 2 actions must be played during the end of that turn, so a good use would be making something on the board that fits a card in your hand and it's only two actions away. Transmutium helps a player when restartium just doesn't cut it anymore. If your plan is to create many elements that are similar in their configuration, maybe transmutium will become your best friend in a game where you end up with many cards in your hand that have similar configurations. You may reconfigure the board in the likeness of any green, purple or red card you have in your score pile, for only one action. It's a bargain, better than restartium when you need to score 2 or 3 point cards. With transmutium, I was able to make better runs of cards and score more points, but the game now more competitive, because while I was struggling to reach a high score with that strategy, other players took advantage of the 5 point cards, that cannot be easily made with the help of transmutium and need the good old extramovium once or twice to guarantee a 5 point card to be added in their score piles.

Last thoughts on the new blue cards: The new blue cards were included as a standard rule in the game, although players that are more keen on playing the core game, could exclude them and try the game the old-fashioned way, but the element of surprise is a fundamental piece in the more-than-two players game. It increases interaction and suggests that players should keep their eyes on the board at all times, so that they don't miss out on a chemical creation/reaction that they might turn to their advantage. Making puns out of element's names: This was a mind nubbing experience. Putting down every name, analysing it, saying it over and over again, slowly, fast, thinking how it sounds and finally making a similar word out of it that reminds it. Below are some examples of this pun-math-experience: Carbon = Car + bon ... bon~bone Sulphur = Sol + fur Manganese ~ Manga + niece and so on...

The Scientists of W.C:
Nobels in a game. Many players, way back, in the ancient times of the W.C. prototype, suggested that each player should take a role, like a scientist. The scientists, of course, were not a part of the game, back then. But, then I thought, what's the best way to take advantage of player's feedback? Make something out of it! Like an expansion... And the scientists fit the game like a glove in a palm. Each scientist is derived from a real-life nobel-prize-winner chemist. Each scientist card has the year he or she won the nobel prize and a unique ability that makes the game easier to play. And since scientists in the mostly give free actions or extra things to do, they add up a more strategic element to the game (designer's note: the strategic element is not a card in the game...yet.)

Tony Cimino
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
MAGE Company
msg tools
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb


Here are the new cards of Wrong Chemistry: Expand Your Lab which will be available in Essen Spiel at our booth: Hall 1 - Booth C137. Thumbs Up if you like them

We are looking forward to play the game in Essen!




1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.