Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Vegas Showdown» Forums » Sessions

Subject: two-player games on Chinese New Year rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Alan Kwan
Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
On Chinese New Year day, me and my wife played two games of Vegas Showdown, using my "2-player variant rules". This is our second and third 2-player games using this variant version; these games have the purpose of testing out these rules, in addition to entertaining ourselves.

We have been playing this game (some standard 3- and 4-player games, and a few different 2-player versions) a lot recently, and my wife is picking up the strategies quickly (by playing against a worthy opponent ).

Players: Alan, Kaoru

The first game was a close one in which I won by a narrow margin. I could see Kaoru's play improving.

The second game started with three yellow premier tiles! I went for Slots and then Fancy Slots, my favorite start, while Kaoru got a Slots on the second turn and the Sports Book on the third. (The neutral player got the Table Games.)

In this game, the medium premier tiles came out quickly, while the small ones came out really slow. At the end of the game, there were 5 small tiles left in the stack! This was something I was not very used to, because in previous games the small tiles tended to come out fast. In fact, not reacting appropriately to the situation gave Kaoru a chance to win this game.

I bought too many Facny Slots, at a bit too high prices, and suffered a bit from poor cash management. Having the "Taxes" event coming out on consecutive turns, just after I had spent my cash and was counting on my income (which was higherthan Kaoru's - just then, and was overtaken later ...), didn't help either. Because of cash mismanagement and careless under-evaluation of the Fancy Lounges, I let Kaoru get too many of them.

The Theater came up near the end of the game, and Kaoru got it - I being just a few dollars short. I perhaps got too many Lounges, and too many Fancy Slots (especially, one for $12 after seeing the Theater on the board - not a good deal in the late game). On the turn when I could afford to bid on the Theater, I did not hesitate to bid $37 - as much as I could afford. And Kaoru, correctly, did not hesitate either to outbid me. On the same turn, the Five-Star Steak House was at a minimum bid price of $33. But the neutral player bid twice on it, so I could not afford it either.

In the end, Kaoru won with 74 to 60. Her potent Fancy Lounges and powerful Theater gave her the win. Also, she was able to build up her income effectively, balancing the Revenue from her Slots and Sports Book with the Population from her Restaurant and Fancy Lounges.





The winning margin was 14 points, greater than the 12 printed Fame on the Theater. She also got 4 Fame for red corners with the Theater. If she had not got the Theater, she would have at least scored 4.2 Fame for the $42 she paid for it, so she could still have won without getting the Theater - provided that I did not get it in her stead, of course.

An interesting point: if I had got the Five-Star Steak House, I could have scored 6 for its printed Fame, a swing of 6 Fame for winning the Population ranking (I lost just 13 to 14), and 4 for red corners. That would bring the final scores to a very close margin, although I would still have lost (after deducting the Fame value of the price of the Steak House).

I always enjoy losing a good game: "good" defined as my knowing how and why I lost. In this game, I lost due to cash mismanagement and incorrect bidding, and hampered a bit also by unlucky events and tile order, and layout mistakes.

In both these two games, the High Rollers Rooms were very difficult to use, because neither of us got any Table Games before they appeared. (The neutral player bought them, or they were lower down in the stack.) In the first game, a High Rollers Room even fell off the board when it was not bid on at $3.

In these games, the neutral player got 10 to 12 tiles. That was around 150% of the tiles a player got on average. In other words, the neutral player simulated the competition (for the premier tiles) from one-and-a-half players; we had an amount of competition midway between a 3-player game and a 4-player game. This is perhaps ideal for a 2-player variant.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick Paterni
United States
Mount Clemens
Michigan
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Hmm...perhaps i've been playing wrong, but it appears that the yellow player has incorrect placement of green tiles. It was my understanding that all green tiles MUST start at an entrance door, and MUST be connected to other greens, ie. no lone green tiles that are not connected to any other greens. It would appear, however that the blue player had played correctly. Having played in that way, it becomes much more imparative to get a lounge 1st or 2nd turn, or else you will have to eventually renovate to fit it in, unless you only build up one side initially. The official rules aren't perfectly clear (in fact, one of the example photos on another page has an incorrectly played tile on it) but that is what my game group and I got out of the rule.

-Nick
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean McCarthy
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Alan, love to read your reports.

Nick, you have been playing wrong - there is no requirement for green tiles to be accessible only through other green tiles to the door.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alan Kwan
Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
From the rules:

"Green tiles must connect to either entrance."

The connection can be through tiles of any color. (This is true even for yellow and blue tiles.) In particular, once you connect the two entrances, you may place any tile (exception: Night Club) anywhere, as long as it connects to anything.

This is why, in my strategy article, I say that Lounges have great "layout value", even though their printed values barely break even (against the cost).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.