Recommend
102 
 Thumb up
 Hide
64 Posts
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 

Android: Netrunner» Forums » Strategy

Subject: Three Styles of Haas-Bioroid rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Billy Martin
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Over on the BGG OCTGN League, I have lately been taking a break from my quest to win with every identity, and I have instead been basking in the sheer undefeatability of HB:Engineering The Future. In fact, I'm starting to think that all this talk about the game favoring the runner is wrong -- at least when the corp is HB:EtF.

I'm going to present two very strong HB styles to you, and one strong and popular style that you are likely already familiar with. But remember this: The most important thing to know about playing HB is that you are going to win through economy. This is the greatest strength of HB. The other three corps have flamboyant combos they can pull of in one go for a big win. Weyland will SEASource+Scorched Earth+Scorched Earth you. NBN will Astroscript+Astroscript+Astroscript+Breaking News you. Jintkei will Chum+Data Mine+Fetal AI+Neural EMP you. Not HB. HB rejects these unlikely combos and just goes for a steady economic victory through a combination of solid cards and predictable outcomes.

This isn't to say that the three methods below are the only ways to play HB. Far from it. You can make a great HB Scorched Earth deck if you want to. But to make it work, you need to play to the strengths of HB, which is their economy. Otherwise you might as well pick a different corp.

In any game, economy is a pretty good thing to be good at. Having more resources is great. It's usually not difficult to turn a huge resource advantage into victory in most board games, and Netrunner is no exception. There will be times, playing HB, that you have this incredible credit lead over the runner, and it seems like you're unstoppable. However, I want you to remember this every game you play as corp: Every Credit Counts. VERY often games will come down to a single credit in the end. It can be the difference between victory and defeat. NEVER say to yourself, "I'm going to throw a few extra credits on this trace, why not?" You'll be sorry you did so later (In fact, you should rarely ever boost traces, and when you do it should be because there is a very good reason to do so). Making the most out of every click and every credit is key to winning a lot of Netrunner games.

Alright, so far I've told you two things:

1) HB is going to win through economy.

2) Every credit counts.

It somehow took me four paragraphs to say that. Fuck. This is going to be a long article. Let's just have a deck-list already, shall we?

STYLE 1: HB RUSH

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (54)

Agenda: (10)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
Executive Retreat (Trace Amount) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3
False Lead (A Study in Static) x1

Asset: (9)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Melange Mining Corp (Core) x3
Eve Campaign (Humanity's Shadow) x3

ICE: (21)
Chimera (Cyber Exodus) x3
Enigma (Core) x3
Ice Wall (Core) x3 ■
Rototurret (Core) x3
Wall of Static (Core) x3
Caduceus (What Lies Ahead) x3 ■■
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3

Operation: (9)
Biotic Labor (Core) x3
Hedge Fund (Core) x3
Green Level Clearance (A Study in Static) x3

Upgrade: (5)
Ash 2X3ZB9CY (What Lies Ahead) x3
SanSan City Grid (Core) x2 ■■■

Total Agenda Points: 22

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 45
Jinteki: 0
NBN: 6
The Weyland Consortium: 9

I thought long and hard about which HB Rush decklist to include in this article. This is a deck that for me is constantly evolving. The corp deck I brought to the So Cal Regionals was an earlier version of HB Rush. In the end, I decided to just post my latest version, which I have been playing and winning with most recently. This list (and all the lists in this article) doesn't include Future Proof, but I don't think I would really change much here for that expansion. At any rate, the deck-list isn't terribly important. The really interesting thing about HB Rush is how you play it.

First off I need to give a shout out to Orange Devil. He's been playing HB Rush since Core, waaayy before it was nearly as viable as it is now. He's the person I originally learned this style of HB from. However lately I've been seeing it crop up all over the place. I think a lot of people are figuring this deck out and playing around with it.

There are a couple of important things to note about this deck-list. First Important Thing: count up the economy cards. Hedge Fund x3, GLC x3, MMC x3, Adonis x3, Eve x3. Fifteen economy cards. Holy crap. Even for a 54 card deck, that's a lot. You'd think that with all that economy, I must be playing some really expensive ice. But nope! In fact, that's the Second Important Thing: All cheap ice. Also, nearly all of the ice in this deck ends the run. That's VERY important. The inclusion of Ichi 1.0 here is kind of iffy, but there is good reason to have him here I'll talk about later.

What this deck is about is early game dominance. The reason it has fifteen economy cards is because it wants to consistently draw economy. If you only have 9 economy cards in a 49 card corp deck, you sometimes don't draw an economy card in your opening hand. Sometimes you don't draw your first economy card until 3 or 4 turns into the game. That's a LONG time when you remember the fact that the average Netrunner game is only about 14 turns.

The reason it has all cheap ice is because it wants to consistently draw cheap ice. The biggest problem with having Tollbooth in your deck is sometimes its in your opening hand being absolutely useless for the first few turns of the game. This deck has VERY few cards that you don't want in your opening hand. In fact, it often wants an agenda in its opening hand.

This is a rush deck. This is not a draw-half-your-deck deck. It wants to win FAST, and so to do that it has to be a deck that can win with nearly any subset of cards that it happens to draw in a particular game. This deck will often win in just 10-12 turns and if it takes you longer than that you've probably lost.

That said, it's very important you DO NOT play this deck like you would play a Super Server deck (which I will talk about later). You don't just sit back and defend. You don't build up and take credits. You don't wait for the perfect time to score an agenda. Instead, you play aggressively, you take risks when you have to, and you try to score agendas as early and as safely as possible so you can move on to the next agenda.

Suppose on the 2nd turn you create a remote server that is: Agenda, Chimera, Ice Wall. This server is actually quite a hassle for the runner to get into. He needs all three breakers just to get past Chimera. If Chimera is the inner-most ice, he can't Inside Job in. If he doesn't have Corroder on the table, you don't even need to rez Chimera, but if you do, the whole server only costs you 3 credits. On the 2nd turn of the game, this is a very safe server for scoring agendas. Even with Crypsis, the runner has to pay 5 to install Crypsis, and then put 2 counters on it, and then have 3 more credits to break your ice. Not likely, particularly when you consider how ballsy that is when the runner does not know that card is an agenda and does not know that the ice is so small.

Of course, it usually isn't Chimera and Ice Wall. Normally you draw less optimal ice like Rototurret and Wall of Static. This is a lot more expensive to set-up, but it's nearly as hard for the runner to break through, and more so if he happens to run Crypsis. Regardless of what specific ice you happen to draw, you ideally want to put two of them out on the 2nd turn to create a nice safe place to score agendas.

So what did you do on the first turn? Did you ice up R&D and HQ perhaps? HAHA, NO. Of course not. How much ice do you think you drew here? Four ice? What ridiculousness. This deck has 15 economy cards. Of course you drew a mix of economy and ice (which luckily is what you wanted anyway), not all ice. No. You did not waste your precious early-game End The Run ice defending centrals. You need that ice to score agendas and that's what you are using it for. You left R&D undefended for the first couple turns. The runner already scored an Executive Retreat, the lucky bastard. DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT. You didn't want to draw that right now anyway.

Never put Enigma or Chimera on a central. Those are for remotes, and they are for STOPPING the runner until he finds his breakers. Rototurret should almost always go on your remote as well, but sometimes it can defend a central (preferably unrezzed). NEVER* PUT CHIMERA ON A CENTRAL. The only thing Chimera can do on a central is stop Account Siphon or Maker's Eye. You do NOT want to be rezzing that every turn to keep the runner at bay. The whole point of Chimera is you only need to rez it once or twice to protect an agenda you are about to score. It does NOTHING to keep the runner out long-term, and once the runner gets Crypsis or all three breakers it's pretty useless.

(*Against Criminal a single Chimera on HQ solely for the purpose of stopping Account Siphon can be a good play as long as you don't rez it until they play Account Siphon)

If you draw Caduceus in your opening hand that is great because it is perfect for defending a central. Wall of Static and Ichi are also good for centrals. These are ice that even when the runner can break them are very expensive. That's exactly what you want for centrals.

Let me talk for a second about defending R&D. It's OK if the runner gets a few hits on R&D. R&D is only a problem if the runner can access 15+ cards, because at that point he starts winning on average. Most games you can allow several hits on R&D and be fine. What about those games where the runner accesses 5 or 6 cards and scores 7 agenda points? Guess what: you are going to lose those games. There is NO POINT in trying to win those games. You can't stop the runner from hitting R&D a few times over the course of a game. Statistically, you will lose SOME games because the runner was very lucky and scored 7 points from that. It doesn't matter if you iced up R&D turn 1 and they got it with a couple late-game Maker's Eye, or if you left R&D open for the first few turns. Either way, they accessed some cards, and if they were lucky, there is nothing you could have done about it.

Elsewhere, I talk about luck and the four ways to lose at Netrunner. Do not worry about your opponent getting lucky draws and winning that way. You can't control it. Instead, focus on the variables you can control. Win more often through economic advantage by making good choices in the game to maximize your outcome.

If you choose to strategically leave R&D open then on average you will lose slightly more often to the runner scoring big on R&D. The trade-off is that you might win a lot more often because of the benefits of having your resources put elsewhere, like scoring that agenda that is burning a hole in your HQ.

With HB Rush your ICE priorities should be:

Against Gabe:
1) Ice on HQ (one should be enough)
2) Ice on Remote (ideally two b/c of Inside Job/Corroder)
3) Ice on R&D/Archives

Against Not-Gabe:
1) Ice on Remote (IF YOU HAVE AN AGENDA IN HAND)
2) Ice on R&D
3) More ice on Remote and R&D
4) Ice on HQ/Archives (only if needed for some reason)

The reason Rush decks get away with not defending R&D as early is because those late-game Maker's Eye runs are not so relevant when there is no late game. Since your goal is to win fast, you have to cut corners to reach that goal, but you make up for it by ending the game before the runner can access even more cards from R&D. You're essentially trading late R&D accesses for early R&D accesses, but the runner sees about the same number of cards on average per game. If the runner happens to be one that sets up slowly for big R&D hits later on (ahem, Noise), then making this trade is particularly good for you since you are essentially cutting him off from that part of the game where he is strongest.

If you drew enough ice in your opening hand (common) then go ahead and put one on R&D or HQ on turn 1. If you don't have any agendas, then defending R&D is more important because you want to draw an agenda and you can't do that if the runner is stealing all of them.

Speaking of drawing agendas, that's something you're going to need to do with this deck. As such, get used to spending actions to draw cards. This is an option that is perhaps underrated as corp. Since Every Credit Counts, you'd normally want to click for credits a lot as corp, but this is very inefficient, and a lot of the current strength of runners is that they don't need to do that so much. As corp, it is often better to draw a card. This deck in particular, since it has so many economy cards, can easily afford to click to draw because it will often draw into economy anyway so clicking for cards is effectively like clicking for credits. Because of HB:EtF's identity ability, your turn will often be, (mandatory draw), draw, draw, install something (an economy asset). This is VERY efficient both economically and at working towards your goal of scoring agendas and winning the game.

Even if you don't want to draw an agenda right that second, you should still be drawing cards because you might get the thing you need such that you DO want an agenda. If you don't draw what you need, (whether it is an agenda or an ice) you did get through more of your deck which gets you that much closer to drawing what you need. If your shuffle is unlucky you can't do anything about it. Seeing more of that shuffle only increases the odds in your favor. Particularly against Noise, or against a runner who pressures R&D, you need to see more cards than they do to have a good shot at winning. Luckily it only costs you an action to see a card from R&D. Use that to your advantage as often as possible.

The only time you should click for a credit is if credits are the ONE missing piece that you need right now. Otherwise, you should probably be drawing.

Ash in this deck is a pseudo-ice. He's really good. The main benefit of Ash is you don't have to spend 2-3 credits to install him in your remote with 2-3 ice. That alone is HUGE. Remember when I said Every Credit Counts? Ash saves you several credits and as such is one of the best ice in this deck. Even though he isn't ice. How about that?

A good 1st turn play is: Ice on a central, Ash in a remote, Ice in front of Ash. If they Inside Job it, then they used up an Inside Job and five credits just to trash Ash (fantastic value for you). If they don't Inside Job it, you can put an agenda there next turn, and use Ash to stop the Inside Job when they do it. Very cool.

Let's look at the precious few non-economy, non-ice slots in this deck:

3x Biotic Labor
2x SanSan
0x Aggressive Secretary (optional, good in this deck)

Biotic Labor is your "late" game. Basically, after dominating the runner in the early game and scoring a couple of agendas before they could get into your invincible Chimera/Ice Wall remote, you need some way to close it out. After a short while (like 7 or 8 turns at most) the runner will get all setup and he can run through nearly every ice in this deck for a pittance. Once that happens you need to fast advance that last 1 or 2 agendas for the win. Here drawing cards is of course critical, because you need to draw an agenda to score it, and also because you need to draw Biotic Labor.

SanSan is pretty much the perfect card for this deck. NOT Trick of Light. Biotic Labor has you covered for fast advance, and you should only need to use Fast Advance once if your early game worked out. SanSan can be a late game Fast Advance (if the runner is too stingy or poor to trash it) but more importantly it is an early game accelerator. Because the ice in this deck is so cheap and annoying for the runner to get past, they often can't even trash your SanSan even if they have the credits to do so. If you can get away with scoring multiple agendas off a single rezzed SanSan, the advantages are incredible. Not only does it eliminate the risk of leaving 3/2 agendas out for a turn, but it also saves you a lot of credits in advancement counters. And the runner STILL has to trash it, which slows them down.

A moderately common win scenario with this deck against a passive runner: Mid game, rez SanSan and score a 3/2. Runner can't trash it? Install Executive Retreat and advance it once. Maybe put an Ash down as well. Still can't get in? Score Executive Retreat. This is their last chance. If they don't trash SanSan, you use the retreat to draw 5 cards, hopefully drawing into Biotic Labor and a 3/2, which you play immediately for the win.

Aggressive Secretary is another good card for the late game. It can basically act as a "reset" button, trashing the runner's icebreakers and putting the game back to the state where you are strong (i.e. when he can't get past your Chimera/Ice Wall). Nowadays when runners like Gabe and Chaos Theory and Noise are cutting Infiltration to make room for all those juicy new Genesis cards, Secretary can be especially powerful. It's a particularly dangerous threat if the first two agendas you score happen to be 3/2s. Then when you play a card and advance it twice the runner pretty much HAS to run it because otherwise you could win next turn with a 5/3. I used to include 1 or 2 Secretaries in my HB Rush deck but lately I have been cutting it to make room for more economy cards.

Notice what is absent from this deck: Archived Memories. It's a good card, but there is no room for it here. It's too slow and too niche. You don't want it early game, and you don't really need it late game (not as much as you need Biotic Labor). It's good against Noise, but you aren't always playing against Noise. Other than getting back a SanSan or an Aggressive Secretary, there really isn't much use for it here.

Since the ice in this deck is cheap and mostly designed to keep the runner out temporarily, if the game goes long you're going to be in trouble, because against a full rig there is little you can do. The exception is when playing against Noise. Since Noise decks mostly rely on Crypsis, you should be alright late game with your Wall of Static and Ichi 1.0 that still cost a pretty penny to get through. Since you have a lot of cheap ice you can stack it several layers deep protecting your R&D and your SanSan which makes you more resistant to Parasite. Ichi 1.0 is important to include in this deck largely because of Noise. Without it, you're vulnerable to Parasite insta-trashing Rototurret and Chimera. Ichi 1.0 is also great against Gabe, and along with Caduceus it provides you with "efficient" (rather than, "run ending") ice for protecting R&D and other centrals.

The agenda composition is really all about being as cheap and as fast as possible. You win with the fewest possible advancement counters if you can score a 5/3 and two 3/2s. This is really important. During that brief early period of the game when the runner can't break your mini-server, you really want to score a 5/3, which is why there are three copies of Executive Retreat. Project Vitruvius can be a proxy for Executive Retreat if you don't draw one early. The extra Vitruvius counters can later be used to play Biotic Labor over and over again and score a late-game Executive Retreat from hand (you need to play Biotic Labor three times to do this, so two Vitruvius counters are enough). False lead gives you an extra way to win if you never draw an Executive Retreat (this happens sometimes), though if you're making a 49 card version of this, that's the agenda to cut. I wouldn't put Private Security Force in this deck because it's way too expensive and slow. The extra advancement counter it needs over ABT or Vitruvius is a big deal for lots of reasons, not the least of which is that it's an extra click and credit. Every Credit Counts.

To recap your overall game plan:

Early game: Get a small remote the runner can't break yet. Score an early agenda, hopefully either an Executive Retreat or a Project Vitruvius with two counters. Leave R&D open if you have to.

Early/Mid game: Do some Melange Mining to fund Ash. Score another agenda. Make the runner trash SanSan. Slow the runner down.

Mid/Late game: Use the credits you built up with all those economy cards to fast advance the last agenda you need to win.
79 
 Thumb up
7.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Billy Martin
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
STYLE 2: HB FAST ADVANCE

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (11)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
False Lead (A Study in Static) x2
Private Security Force (Core) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3

Asset: (6)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Eve Campaign (Humanity's Shadow) x3

ICE: (15)
Caduceus (What Lies Ahead) x1 ■■
Ice Wall (Core) x3 ■
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Shadow (Core) x1 ■
Viktor 1.0 (Core) x2
Wall of Static (Core) x3
Viper (Cyber Exodus) x2

Operation: (17)
Archived Memories (Core) x3
Biotic Labor (Core) x3
Hedge Fund (Core) x3
Rework (Humanity's Shadow) x3
Trick of Light (Trace Amount) x3 ■■■
Green Level Clearance (A Study in Static) x2

Upgrade: (0)

Total Agenda Points: 20

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 50
Jinteki: 9
NBN: 0
The Weyland Consortium: 6


Lots of people these days are playing HB with Fast Advance. Fast Advance can be very powerful. However, there is a difference between playing "HB with Fast Advance", and playing HB Fast Advance. Any HB deck that has Biotic Labor could be considered "HB with Fast Advance". Heck, the HB Rush deck above could easily be considered "HB with Fast Advance" and yet in many ways it's almost the exact opposite of this deck.

This HB Fast Advance deck is different. It doesn't just have fast advance, it's ALL fast advance. Every agenda it scores, it scores straight from HQ in a single turn. You almost never need to put ice on a remote server. (This is the deck that everyone on the forums would be bitching and moaning about right now if FFG wasn't so quick to release Future Proof with its R&D Interface)

This deck aims for a long game. It's slow and methodical and unstoppable. Despite this major philosophical difference from the HB Rush deck, it shares some key points in common: Lots of cheap ice, and lots of economy cards. HB will win through economy. This will allow you to stay ahead of the runner from turn one. Fast Advance is very expensive and you need to score four agendas to win. You can take your time, but you need to have a lot of credits to pull this off, and you don't want to waste those credits rezzing expensive ice.

The ice in this deck is very different than the ice in the HB Rush deck. While the rush deck goes for "end the run" ice, this deck goes for "efficient" ice. Nearly every ice in this deck costs nearly as much or more for the runner to break through as it costs to rez. The trade-off is that most of the ice does not actually stop the runner. This is ideal for central server protection, as you don't mind if the runner gets through once or twice when he wants to but you need to make him pay for every access. By putting taxing ice on R&D it makes it difficult for the runner to hit it enough times over the course of the game to win on average.

Since this deck only needs ice on centrals, it has much less ice than your typical corp deck. Even with only 15 ice, it still draws way too much ice. However, cutting to fewer ice presents a problem in that too often you don't draw an ice in your opening hand. This is very awkward. You want to consistently draw one or two ice at the early stages of the game.

As the game drags on (and it will) you will draw and draw and every ice you get will go on a central server. You'll stack R&D four or five ice deep. Since you score every agenda you draw straight out of hand, R&D is your biggest vulnerability. If this deck were a boss in a video game, R&D would be its flashing glowing weak spot.

You will also want at least a couple ice on HQ for the late game. When the runner starts focusing all his efforts on running R&D, you're going to need to draw cards so that you have better odds of hitting agendas than the runner. This means when you draw an agenda it might have to sit in HQ for a turn. Keep that defended.

Occasionally you might put ice on a remote to protect an Adonis or Eve Campaign for a turn. Since you're HB, this costs you nothing, as installing the ice there gives you a credit.

When I first started playing Android:Netrunner and I saw Melange Mining Corp, I thought "wow, this card is awesome, but it's going to suck once people start playing Fast Advance decks" (I had some prior experience playing the original Netrunner) That day has arrived. As such, this deck does not play MMC. Since you're not putting ice on remotes there is nowhere for MMC to go. Conveniently, that makes every card in this deck that isn't an agenda either untrashable or expensive to trash. This makes R&D that much more resilient.

Rework is surprisingly important. First off, it gets rid of any Private Security Force that you might draw. Second, it handles those awkward situations where you draw multiple agendas before drawing your fast advance cards. It happens. If you play this deck a few times and you keep getting lucky and drawing cards in the right order, you might get the impression that Rework is useless. Do not fall for this complacency. Play the deck more. It won't always go down that way.

The deck has eight agendas that are fast-advancable. It has six fast advance cards, and three Archived Memories to re-play those fast advance cards. That's eight agendas total, and nine fast advance cards. You need to draw four of each to win. So get drawing. It'll take a while, but there is not much the runner can do other than make expensive R&D runs. Plus, you will often have an extra fast advance card, in which case you can score a PSF. Really, this deck is pretty easy to play, so I don't have to give you too much strategy advice. But playing it will cause you to die a little on the inside, so I suggest you not play it too much outside of tournaments.

You do need to watch out for four cards that counter this deck:

1) Medium

2) Noise

3) Imp

4) R&D Interface (as of Future Proof)

Medium can be dangerous because it allows serious pressure on R&D even when it costs a lot of money to run there. Clear virus counters often. Imp will trash your economy assets. Losing Eve to Imp is particularly painful, to the point where I'm thinking of cutting Eve just for this reason. Eve is so good otherwise though. It's a tough call. Noise will happily meet you in the late-game with his workshops and viruses and he has a pretty solid chance of winning against this deck, particularly since he generally comes with Medium and Imp as well. So it turns out the counter to the horrible non-interactive corp deck is the horrible non-interactive runner deck. How poetic.
46 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Billy Martin
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
STYLE 3: HB SUPER SERVER

I'll be honest with you. Though this style is popular, I haven't really been playing it much lately. I struggled to come up with a deck-list for this article, but anything I give you will probably be untested and sub-optimal. As such, I'm going to go ahead and steal Malefact's deck (without permission):

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (7)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x1
Executive Retreat (Trace Amount) x3
Priority Requisition (Core) x3

Asset: (13)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Encryption Protocol (Trace Amount) x3
Melange Mining Corp (Core) x3
PAD Campaign (Core) x3
Zaibatsu Loyalty (Core) x1 ■

ICE: (20)
Enigma (Core) x3
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Janus 1.0 (What Lies Ahead) x1
Neural Katana (Core) x3 ■■
Rototurret (Core) x2
Tollbooth (Core) x3 ■■
Wall of Static (Core) x3
Wall of Thorns (Core) x2 ■

Operation: (6)
Archived Memories (Core) x3
Hedge Fund (Core) x3

Upgrade: (3)
Ash 2X3ZB9CY (What Lies Ahead) x3

Total Agenda Points: 20

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 32
Jinteki: 9
NBN: 6
The Weyland Consortium: 0

It serves him right for posting such a good deck. He had to know it would get net-decked. If you net-deck this list, then you will be net-decking from someone who net-decked from someone else. You've committed 2nd degree net-decking. Oh the shame!!

There are a few things that I love about this deck-list. For one, it has tons of economy. Fifteen economy cards, if you count Encryption Protocol (which I do, since it often functions similarly to Pad Campaign). Second, this is a pre-Cyber Exodus deck-list. It comes from an era when HB Super Server was one of the most dominant deck archetypes. It also means I don't have to justify the fact that this deck doesn't have 3x Project Vitruvius and 3x ABT.

The agenda composition is certainly very interesting. Only 7 agendas, and you need to score three of them to win. How does this deck do that?

Like the HB Fast Advance deck, this deck has a very powerful late-game. Its late game is very different however. It relies on having a strong remote server and keeping the runner broke and unable or unwilling to run. It's very different from the other two decks I've talked about, but it still wins through economy.

I won't go too much into strategy for this deck. If you want that, read Malefact's excellent article, and give it a thumb while you're there. Instead, I want to talk about how this deck contrasts with the other two decks above, and how this deck archetype fits into the current meta.

The fact is, if you've been playing Netrunner for a while, then you already have an HB Super Server deck, and you are likely already familiar with the archetype. I'd probably categorize almost any HB deck that has 3x Tollbooth and zero Biotic Labor to be an HB Super Server deck.

There were a couple of significant changes that occurred with Cyber Exodus that really affected this archetype. For one, Project Vitruvius was introduced, and that made both HB Rush and HB Fast Advance significantly more viable. But that only gave HB Super Server more competition. The real blow to the deck was Emergency Shutdown.

When Emergency Shutdown came out, there was a ton of bitching and moaning about how powerful it was. This was at a time when Criminal was already probably the strongest faction, and HB Super Server decks were popular, and a majority of corp decks included three copies of Tollbooth. Of course, there were also a minority of people who said, "relax, FFG thoroughly playtests their games, I'm sure Emergency Shutdown is not as ridiculous as it seems." Well, after playing it for a good long while, I think I can safely say that the bitchers and moaners were right: Emergency Shutdown is just as ridiculous as it seems, at least from the perspective of HB Super Server decks.

That isn't to say that this deck is completely ruined. Far from it. It's obviously still a very powerful deck when not playing against a deck with Emergency Shutdown. Against Noise and Shaper, this deck is as strong as it ever was. Sure, Parasite presents an inefficiency in that Noise can trash a piece of ice you spent a lot of credits rezzing, so big ice might not be most optimal, but a Tollbooth can still slow Noise down so much that it's a very strong card even if it gets Parasited. Workshop Noise makes things a bit harder for 7-agenda corp decks because you can no longer rely on Archived Memories to get agendas back, but the fact that you can build such a strong remote server AND defend R&D really well means you can usually win before Noise can if you use a more standard agenda composition.

Even if you are playing against a Criminal deck with Emergency Shutdown, all is not lost. It's still possible to win. Winning an economic battle against Criminal is a very difficult task, but if any corp can do it, it's HB. The key card here is Melange Mining Corp. Having an 8-cost ice be de-rezzed is devastating, but MMC can let you recover from that in just a couple of turns. What's nice about Criminal is they usually can't afford to run a strong remote server over and over again, so if you have an MMC behind say a Tollbooth and another ice, it's actually quite safe. Try and mine an extra turn or two more than usual against Criminal. Hopefully you draw a 2nd MMC or an Archived Memories, so you can mine, then score an agenda, then get back MMC and mine some more.

Some HB Super Server decks try to capitalize on Accelerated Beta Test runs. You're certainly more likely to run a beta test with this deck than with the other two decks listed above. As damaging as Emergency Shutdown is for you, getting a free Tollbooth off an ABT is equally damaging to the runner, if not more so. To stack the odds in your favor, you need to leave ABT advanced for a turn, and then have an Archived Memories ready to play immediately after scoring to get back any agenda it trashes. It's a risky play but it can pay off big time. Some people like to use Precognition with ABT, but I don't like this combo so much. It's too expensive. Precog is a lot of influence, is not as flexible as Archived Memories, and you still have to leave ABT advanced for a turn. Besides, if you want to win with wacky combos, there are three other corps to choose from. This is HB. We strive for consistency.
45 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Billy Martin
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
TL; DR

To reiterate the two points I started out with:

1) HB wins through economy.

2) Every credit counts.

These are true regardless of what specific HB deck you choose to build. The 2nd point is true for all corporations.

Now you'll go out and play HB Fast Advance, and you'll find that when you win you have a few credits leftover (okay, you'll have 30 credits leftover). Maybe you'll think I'm wrong about this Every Credit Counts business. I'm not wrong. It's about averages. You don't know on turn four how many credits you will have when the game ends. It might be 30, or it might be zero. Or you might lose because you were a few credits short. You need to be a careful steward of your resources so that you will win more often on average. Many many games are very close.

There is a lot of luck in Netrunner, but it is still very much an economic game of resource management. If you have significantly more resources than the runner, then you're quite likely to win. No matter which HB deck you choose, you're going to have one ace in the hole that you're guaranteed to draw every single game:



Even in a short game with HB Rush, the Engineering the Future ID can give you 7-8 credits easy, over the course of the game. That's HUGE. And for longer games it's even more than that. Few other identities can match that level of economy, but the best part is EtF gives you this without making any demands on what you include in your deck or what style of game you choose to play. Other powerful IDs, like Noise for example, require that you build your deck in a particular way to get the most benefit out of them. Not EtF. It doesn't care. It just sits there from turn 1, giving you credit after credit after credit.

The fact that HB also has some of the strongest corp economy cards in the game (Adonis Campaign, Eve Campaign, Green Level Clearance) and its not hard to see where their strengths lie.

The economy is the reason why I don't think NBN Fast Advance will ever be able to compete with HB Fast Advance. The economy just isn't there. Don't get me wrong, I've always been a huge NBN fanboy. Before Cyber Exodus I used to argue that NBN was the strongest corp. It might have even been true back then. But with Project Vitruvius and no Project Beale, they could no longer lay claim to the best Agendas in the game which was their main strength, and with Emergency Shutdown neutering Tollbooth even their ice doesn't cut it. They've been struggling ever since. Not to say you can't build a very strong NBN deck, but you need to use a style different from the ones listed here, because these ones are the areas where HB is the best.
30 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Billy Martin
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
reserved
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
The Hound
Israel
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

Very nice. My first thought is, wouldn't Eli 1.0 be an instant replace for some of the ICE you have?

Edit: Ah, I see that you haven't included Future Proof. I guess Eli will appear in future versions...





2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Palpster
Netherlands
Nunspeet
Gelderland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I applaud you, sir. Very insightful read which I would recommend to anyone.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Smithy

Wheaton
Illinois
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think you forgot one style.

I play a HB version of the NBN Never Advance Deck, which uses SanSan, Biotic Labor, and a big server. Adonis+Eve+Pad is usually enough money, and HB means that the runner has to run early or not at all. Works well, but it (like everything nowadays) is probably countered by RnD interface.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Boivin
Canada
Montréal
Québec
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A type of HB Rush deck that has been very popular here is going with Mandatory Upgrades rather than 3 points agenda. It is worth considering I think. But I like your approach a lot. Thanks for this great article.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John F
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Great read! I think you did a great job of differentiating HB Rush vs HB Fast Advance. They are distinct strategies and understanding the difference makes a big difference in playing HB well, and HB very, very well.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lysander .
msg tools
You should post this as an ongoing article series on CardGameDB. They have NBN and Jinteki, but not really much direction for HB.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Blumklotz
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Jopejope, you are my hero.

Too bad I am on the NBN side of things... still it is good for runner recognition of potential corp plays with this ID.

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin
United States
Creve Coeur
MO
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wonderful article(s)! thumbsupthumbsup
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matthew Gagan
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for this.

Does the Shaper faction (and its accompanying link strength) coming into its own for tournament play change your view of Ash's inclusion in these deck styles going forward? People might be playing NBN a bit more as well so some will prepare for that.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Peter O
United States
Oakland
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Here's an economic analysis of my version of the rush deck: The New HB, the turtle straps on a jetpack. You certainly have refined it past my take.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven Tu
South Africa
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Awesome writeup, I remember when the turtle straps on a jetpack came around, that was the time I started experimenting with rush HB, and look at how far it has all come thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup

While at first I really liked the Mandatory Upgrades rush, after some play it felt unnecessary - sure getting one scored is awesome, but man up will lose you more games than win. Such a shame, too
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ony Moose
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
An excellent write up I would add the fourth style of HB deck though (which can be the most fun to play, but is often a little inconsistent: The Operation Recursion deck.

In this style, you either play Commercialisation or BigBrother/PyschoGraphics and aim to close out the game using these, Archived Memories and Vitruvirus tokens. Commercialisation can give you a crushing financial advantage, (and a Str 15+Ice wall) while the tag storm combo deck can instantly boost more Vitruvrius to very high advanced status to recur the combo cards and repeat.

You could try one using Neural EMP, biotic labour and Vitruvirus tokens, but I really don't think it would work as well as PSF and Pyschographics/SeaSource.

An example of the Commercialisation deck is http://boardgamegeek.com/article/11627959#11627959 for trevaur's deck or http://boardgamegeek.com/article/12136547 for kijoe's tag storm deck.

When these decks work, they work amazingly well. But I think they are a little inconsistent without tutoring for the OOF combo cards you need. Having a 16 counter Ice wall sat on R&D is a great defence though, it essentially forces them to pay for a femme to bypass it which is pricy, and then when you are rolling in cash ater a few commercialisations you drop a powerful Draco and lock them out, or use Troubleshooter on a rototurret in your remote to lock them out for a turn, trash the femme and give you 3 more vitruvirus tokens (each one is worth 16+creds from a commercialisation!)

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Malefact
United Kingdom
Oxford
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
jopejope! Thank you for the quality articles (as ever), as a long time HB devotee the analysis really rings true. You’re more than welcome to use my deck as an example, and I’m pleased that you think it makes a good one (for several reasons I don’t think that it’s a top-tier style anymore, but it could well be again).

You mentioned HB + Scorched Earth. I don’t know if it would be out of place to include this here rather than in its own post, but I’ve come up with a build that I’m very happy with and I wanted to share it. It’s probably fairer to call this more of a hybrid SE / Rush deck, but it does go further than simply splashing in a single copy of SE. Lemme know if I should put it into its own thread instead of gumming up yours.


Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future


Agenda – 11

Accelerated Beta Test x 3
Project Vitruvius x 3
Private Security Force x 3
False Lead x 2

Asset - 6

Adonis Campaign x 3
Melange Mining x 3

ICE - 18

Wall of Static x 3
Shadow x 3 ***
Ichi 1.0 x 3
Rototurret x 3
Viper x 2
Enigma x 2
Chimera x 2

Operation - 9

Hedge Fund x 3
Biotic Labor x 2
Archived Memories x 2
Scorched Earth x 2 ********

Upgrade - 5

Ash x 3
Bernice Mai x 2 ****

A lot of what JopeJope wrote above about HB rush also holds true for this deck, so rather than try and rehash what he said which I’ll end up doing poorly, I’m going to concentrate on how I feel an HB SE deck works differently.

WHY SCORCHED EARTH IS GOOD IN HB

People just don’t expect it. Unlike NBN and Weyland, HB has no native tag punishment, and unlike Jinteki, HB isn’t typically all tricksy and damage-dealy.

With the popularity of HB FA & HB Rush, runners are used to seeing a lot of HB influence locked up in single cards like SanSan City Grid, and Trick of Light. The scarcity of visible influence in HB is less suspicious than it used to be.

Rush puts a lot of pressure on the runner to play aggressively, and to take risks, because if they play too passively they’ll lose as you keep scoring your agendas. Gabe especially will be tempted to take tags and not play down their Plascrete – because that’s 3 creds and one more action saved.

SYNERGY BETWEEN HB RUSH / SCORCHED EARTH

The main tag dealers in this build – Shadow and Bernice – are very efficient. If the runner is careful to avoid tags by beating traces, or by removing tags later, it’s going to slow them down, which is going to let you rush agendas by more easily. Alternatively, if the runner keeps their tags, you may well get the chance to flatline them.

Shadow has the added advantage of not seeming like a tag-dealer, and helping you to masquerade as an HB FA deck. (Sometimes I like to advance it a couple of times, just to suggest I’m running Trick of Light. Heh heh heh heh.) Bernice has the added advantage of being an upgrade, which means that she’s yet another card which can masquerade as an agenda.

Ichi is a great piece of ICE. What’s more: a lot of folks breaking Ichi with clicks will leave the tracer subroutine unbroken – if you have enough of a cash advantage, you can stick them with a tag.

False Lead can occasionally set up a surprise SE, and as a 1/3, is a great agenda to Rush with. Vitruvius is a Rush staple, and when overadvanced, facilitates an SE kill. PSF allows you to run all 2-pters, and also sets you up to burn the runner down.

Finally, both SE and Rush are enabled by you building up an economic advantage over the runner. ETF excels at this.

HB SCORCHED EARTH AS SHE IS PLAYED

This may seem obvious, but: you shouldn’t expect to win by using Scorched Earth. Your primary win condition is to score agendas. Think of SE as insurance – a way of punishing the runner if they get too reckless, and a last-ditch attempt of turning the game around if it looks like it is going down the toilet.

Here are the obstacles to killing the runner with SE. Once you know them, you can better judge when it’s worth pursuing, and when it’s best leaving SE well alone.

Obstacle the first: you only have space for two copies, and sometimes you’re just not going to draw them.

Obstacle the second: You’re probably not going to win by having a single copy of Scorched Earth in your hand. Even if your opponent doesn’t expect SE, they’re unlikely to let their hand size dip below four. This means that you’re going to have to have one of the following combos in place first:

SE + SE
SE + Archived Memories
SE + Vitruvius Counter
SE + PSF scored

Two of these conditions rely on you being able to score a 4/2 agenda, which can be difficult to do.

Now we can start to think about tagging the runner. Gabe will often be obliging and tag himself for you, but other IDs are less considerate. Shadow, Bernice and Ichi are your only tag dealers. You want the runner to run these – and, in an ideal world, to run them on their final click. Therefore, the best place for them is your remote, which the runner is usually going to want to run frequently to stop you from shuttling out agendas.

This is why Melange is in the deck. I agree with jopejope that it doesn’t necessarily have a home in Rush, but it’s one of those cards that can goad a runner into running your remote – either because it’s masquerading as an agenda, or because they want to deny you the sweet cash. And, unlike drip economy assets, Melange can put you ahead of the runner very quickly, which is useful for when you want to be able to beat them at a trace next turn. (You shouldn’t sit on a Melange. Use it once, see if the runner bites, then ditch it.)

Finally, you’ll need 6 creds. This shouldn’t be a problem for Haas, but you’ll need to be wary of economy-suppressing cards, or of dipping too low before the turn you want to Scorch the runner.

OTHER NOTES

One of the things this deck wants to do is to set up a semi-permeable remote –which can allow the runner in to get tagged or keep them out as necessary. Ash and Chimera are good for this (in fact, this deck might need one less Viper and one more Chimera).

HB SE will become less viable if NA City Hall sees a lot of play. Perversely, it will also become less viable if it becomes more popular. This deck matches up favourably against Gabe, and I think it will continue to do so.

In my experience this is the most fun HB deck to play. You have all the cool what-did-I-put-in-the-remote mindgamery, plus, when you do manage to get off a successful SE in HB it feels AWESOME, especially when you got there by skill and the skin of your teeth. Some of my best ANR experiences have been games when I nuked people who just didn’t see it coming – the look of horror and surprise on their faces made it all worthwhile.

A lot of the time in tournaments I’ve felt pressured to run something competitive at the cost of running something fun. HB SE lets me have my cake and eat it – a competitive deck that also has a really cool win condition built in.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
D Tse
Canada
Ottawa
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
jopejope wrote:
STYLE 2: HB FAST ADVANCE

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (11)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
False Lead (A Study in Static) x2
Private Security Force (Core) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3

Asset: (6)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Eve Campaign (Humanity's Shadow) x3

ICE: (15)
Caduceus (What Lies Ahead) x1 ■■
Ice Wall (Core) x3 ■
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Shadow (Core) x1 ■
Viktor 1.0 (Core) x2
Wall of Static (Core) x3
Viper (Cyber Exodus) x2

Operation: (17)
Archived Memories (Core) x3
Biotic Labor (Core) x3
Hedge Fund (Core) x3
Rework (Humanity's Shadow) x3
Trick of Light (Trace Amount) x3 ■■■
Green Level Clearance (A Study in Static) x2

Upgrade: (0)

Total Agenda Points: 20

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 50
Jinteki: 9
NBN: 0
The Weyland Consortium: 6


Lots of people these days are playing HB with Fast Advance. Fast Advance can be very powerful. However, there is a difference between playing "HB with Fast Advance", and playing HB Fast Advance. Any HB deck that has Biotic Labor could be considered "HB with Fast Advance". Heck, the HB Rush deck above could easily be considered "HB with Fast Advance" and yet in many ways it's almost the exact opposite of this deck.

This HB Fast Advance deck is different. It doesn't just have fast advance, it's ALL fast advance. Every agenda it scores, it scores straight from HQ in a single turn. You almost never need to put ice on a remote server. (This is the deck that everyone on the forums would be bitching and moaning about right now if FFG wasn't so quick to release Future Proof with its R&D Interface)

This deck aims for a long game. It's slow and methodical and unstoppable. Despite this major philosophical difference from the HB Rush deck, it shares some key points in common: Lots of cheap ice, and lots of economy cards. HB will win through economy. This will allow you to stay ahead of the runner from turn one. Fast Advance is very expensive and you need to score four agendas to win. You can take your time, but you need to have a lot of credits to pull this off, and you don't want to waste those credits rezzing expensive ice.

The ice in this deck is very different than the ice in the HB Rush deck. While the rush deck goes for "end the run" ice, this deck goes for "efficient" ice. Nearly every ice in this deck costs nearly as much or more for the runner to break through as it costs to rez. The trade-off is that most of the ice does not actually stop the runner. This is ideal for central server protection, as you don't mind if the runner gets through once or twice when he wants to but you need to make him pay for every access. By putting taxing ice on R&D it makes it difficult for the runner to hit it enough times over the course of the game to win on average.

Since this deck only needs ice on centrals, it has much less ice than your typical corp deck. Even with only 15 ice, it still draws way too much ice. However, cutting to fewer ice presents a problem in that too often you don't draw an ice in your opening hand. This is very awkward. You want to consistently draw one or two ice at the early stages of the game.

As the game drags on (and it will) you will draw and draw and every ice you get will go on a central server. You'll stack R&D four or five ice deep. Since you score every agenda you draw straight out of hand, R&D is your biggest vulnerability. If this deck were a boss in a video game, R&D would be its flashing glowing weak spot.

You will also want at least a couple ice on HQ for the late game. When the runner starts focusing all his efforts on running R&D, you're going to need to draw cards so that you have better odds of hitting agendas than the runner. This means when you draw an agenda it might have to sit in HQ for a turn. Keep that defended.

Occasionally you might put ice on a remote to protect an Adonis or Eve Campaign for a turn. Since you're HB, this costs you nothing, as installing the ice there gives you a credit.

When I first started playing Android:Netrunner and I saw Melange Mining Corp, I thought "wow, this card is awesome, but it's going to suck once people start playing Fast Advance decks" (I had some prior experience playing the original Netrunner) That day has arrived. As such, this deck does not play MMC. Since you're not putting ice on remotes there is nowhere for MMC to go. Conveniently, that makes every card in this deck that isn't an agenda either untrashable or expensive to trash. This makes R&D that much more resilient.

Rework is surprisingly important. First off, it gets rid of any Private Security Force that you might draw. Second, it handles those awkward situations where you draw multiple agendas before drawing your fast advance cards. It happens. If you play this deck a few times and you keep getting lucky and drawing cards in the right order, you might get the impression that Rework is useless. Do not fall for this complacency. Play the deck more. It won't always go down that way.

The deck has eight agendas that are fast-advancable. It has six fast advance cards, and three Archived Memories to re-play those fast advance cards. That's eight agendas total, and nine fast advance cards. You need to draw four of each to win. So get drawing. It'll take a while, but there is not much the runner can do other than make expensive R&D runs. Plus, you will often have an extra fast advance card, in which case you can score a PSF. Really, this deck is pretty easy to play, so I don't have to give you too much strategy advice. But playing it will cause you to die a little on the inside, so I suggest you not play it too much outside of tournaments.

You do need to watch out for four cards that counter this deck:

1) Medium

2) Noise

3) Imp

4) R&D Interface (as of Future Proof)

Medium can be dangerous because it allows serious pressure on R&D even when it costs a lot of money to run there. Clear virus counters often. Imp will trash your economy assets. Losing Eve to Imp is particularly painful, to the point where I'm thinking of cutting Eve just for this reason. Eve is so good otherwise though. It's a tough call. Noise will happily meet you in the late-game with his workshops and viruses and he has a pretty solid chance of winning against this deck, particularly since he generally comes with Medium and Imp as well. So it turns out the counter to the horrible non-interactive corp deck is the horrible non-interactive runner deck. How poetic.




thanks for this awesome awesome decks with full strategies. one question though from this noob....in the fast advance deck, whens the best time to actually advance the ice walls? im assuming they're in there to trick of light agendas.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben Benjamin

Maryland
msg tools
Thank you for the articles. They are very well written and well reasoned and I think everyone would benefit from trying to play the rush version of this deck just to get an idea of what the corp is capable of. I've been favoring Weyland Rush (long live ICE Wall over Chimera) which pulls a lot of the same kinds of tricks as your deck but where I also get to use the power that is Corporate Troubleshooter + Archer

I had a couple questions regardinng your rush deck. Let me know if you eluded to the answer in parts 2 or 3 (at work, just read the first one for now).

1. Why 54 cards over 49? Was it becasue the ratios just work better that way? Or does it just need more cards to function? Do you think it could be cut down to 49 cards? Or alternatively, could it find a way to add Anonymous Tip (a card I've begun to 2 of in all my corp decks recently) in order to help it aggressively find agendas.

2. What value do you find Eve Campaign to have over Pad Campaign? It's definately a much better Account Siphon deterent, but I can't imagine that 5 rez cost not cramping my game play from time to time. I've recently come around to Pad beinging awesome in HB so I was wondering about your decision to use Eve over it.

Thanks again for the awesome article.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Frank Brooks
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mb
Hdnggrnchrg wrote:
I think you forgot one style.

I play a HB version of the NBN Never Advance Deck, which uses SanSan, Biotic Labor, and a big server. Adonis+Eve+Pad is usually enough money, and HB means that the runner has to run early or not at all. Works well, but it (like everything nowadays) is probably countered by RnD interface.


I agree HB Never Advance is a different deck archetype. It has to be played differently than the three decks you listed. It takes strategies somewhere between them. It makes more reserved use of Fast Advance cards to use them only when necessary, has cheap ice (like Rush) has some expensive/cumbersome ice (like Super). It also utilizes Economic advantage through high-to-trash assets and upgrades.

The inclusion of Mandatory Upgrades of course will break the Never Advance archetype and the deck I've included is the idea of the "HB Hybrid Deck".

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (10)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
Mandatory Upgrades (What Lies Ahead) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3
Private Security Force (Core) x1

Asset: (11)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Aggressive Secretary (Core) x2
Encryption Protocol (Trace Amount) x2
Eve Campaign (Humanity's Shadow) x2
Edge of World (Cyber Exodus) x1 ■■
Project Junebug (Core) x1 ■

ICE: (19)
Heimdall 1.0 (Core) x2
Hourglass (A Study in Static) x1
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Rototurret (Core) x2
Sherlock 1.0 (Trace Amount) x1
Viktor 1.0 (Core) x3
Data Raven (Core) x1 ■■
Ice Wall (Core) x3 ■
Chimera (Cyber Exodus) x2
Wall of Static (Core) x1

Operation: (3)
Biotic Labor (Core) x2
Power Grid Overload (Trace Amount) x1 ■

Upgrade: (6)
Ash 2X3ZB9CY (What Lies Ahead) x2
Experiential Data (Core) x2
SanSan City Grid (Core) x2 ■■■

Total Agenda Points: 20

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 54
Jinteki: 3
NBN: 8
The Weyland Consortium: 4

A lot of using "Hybrid decks" comes from the runner not exactly knowing what you are going to throw at them. I feel that this approach will be powerful contenders for top corp decks. As the card pool expands, there will be more and more deck archetypes that appear. Having a deck that includes parts of a couple different decks will feign being decks that they aren't. The whole deck is misleading and confusing to play against and I often hear from opponents that it is a very fun deck to play against since it is like a puzzle.

If you see an early Data Raven you might think I'm going to be trying to flatline you with a SE so you might install Plascrete (if you have it). If you see a Biotic Labor or SanSan you might think I'm going for fast advance. You are never quite sure what I'm trying to do.

The unfortunate part of any "hybrid deck" is the lack of straightforwardness or obvious game plan. It takes skill and subtly to pull off any specific interaction. With lots of one-ofs and plenty of different minor combo pieces floating around, the early game can vary rather dramatically and each opening hand can play very differently. Some games are three pieces of ice; others are three remote servers; often it is two pieces of ice and a credit or a single piece of ice, a remote server and a credit. Each of those opening plays look like a completely different deck. From an efficiency perspective this looks really awful since there is no obvious "best play" at a given time but from an opponent's perspective it is difficult for them to figure out what you are trying to do.

This particular version of the deck attempts to confuse and delay an invasive runner by having lots of economy assets and upgrades, a few out of place ice, but generally lots of bioroids to eat up early game clicks to delay the runner from building up. A persistent runner can still break into most servers, but it is rather taxing and eats up valuable time. While this is going on, you make a remote server that is at least two ice deep (preferably with a Chimera but otherwise with 2 ETR ice of different ice types). This prevents Inside Job and requires multiple breakers so that it is relatively safe. This server also gets about 3 cards installed in it. Eventually, a card in there is advanced three times. This is the gamble. It might be a trap, it might be an agenda. If they don't run, you might be able to score a Mandatory Upgrades. Otherwise you have a very good defense for your SanSan as you build up money to rez and use it to score some of your 3-2 agendas. The brain damage might tick up as you get a 2 damage Edge of World or they take it from a Viktor or Heimdall in a desperate (or late turn) run. As it ticks up, it makes those Junebugs much more dangerous. I have killed many a runner with Junebugs since it is so hard to be that concerned about that OOF splash while still worrying about everything else. Sometimes you might even be able to convince the runner to hit your unadvanced server with several cards in it since you've been able to score so many agendas with Never Advance that they need to get in there and clear it up. I've killed runners with three damage from EoW this way.

I like the inclusion of Private Security Force since you can sometimes capitalize on a Data Raven tag taking runner or self tagging Criminal. If you score MU before this, you have basically locked the runner. 4 Meat Damage a turn is difficult to deal with. If I wanted to turn it up even further I might even include another PSF and spend more influence on a few more tagging ice so that somebody who is not wary of tags will get pounded into the ground.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Keith Searfoss
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Another excellent write-up, jopejope. While I'm not much of a fan of H-B's theme, I love the way the corp plays. Economic domination can cause issues for even the most cash flush runner.

Our meta here in Chicago sees a whole lot of H-B Rush and Fast Advance decks, and they tend to be very successful if the runner isn't prepared to play the game out of their normal comfort zone (destroy the economy assets, regardless of the cost).

I've been a fan of H-B Super Server since the game's release, and while I'll try to play other corps/strategies, I always gravitate back to the big purple monster that is H-B. However, after several iterations and attempts, I've found that big ICE alone isn't enough, especially with things like Emergency Shutdown bouncing around. So I've been tuning a deck that works as a Super Server, but with a side of brutal punishment and pain. It works, especially if your opponent is expecting Rush/FA. It worked so well, I ended up squeaking into first place at the Dice Dojo Regional in Chicago. Here's the deck list (pre-Future Proof):

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (9)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
Priority Requisition (Core) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3

Asset: (9)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Aggressive Secretary (Core) x3
Melange Mining Corp (Core) x3

ICE: (21)
Heimdall 1.0 (Core) x2
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Janus 1.0 (What Lies Ahead) x2
Rototurret (Core) x3
Tollbooth (Core) x3 ■■
Viper (Cyber Exodus) x3
Wall of Static (Core) x3
Wall of Thorns (Core) x2 ■

Operation: (7)
Archived Memories (Core) x2
Hedge Fund (Core) x3
Precognition (Core) x2 ■■■

Upgrade: (3)
Corporate Troubleshooter (Core) x3

Total Agenda Points: 21

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 41
Jinteki: 8
NBN: 6
The Weyland Consortium: 0


No, I didn't spend all my influence. Heck, the Precognitions are mostly there to fill otherwise unused influence space. I know this game isn't that old, nor does it have a huge card pool, so I find it funny when I play a card and have my opponent say "What's that?!", especially when that something is Priority Requisition. Which, by the way, is pretty easy to score in this deck, since folks figure the only thing you'd install and double advance would be a trap. And sometimes it is a trap. I love Aggressive Secretary. This deck also sees the return of good old Corporate Troubleshooter, the reason I broke down and bought 3 core sets. It feels good to actually be using them. I just need to remember to use them correctly (I got trounced the first round of the tournament because I miscounted how much money I needed to spend to make Rototurret unbreakable and it threw me off my game).

With the advent of Future Proof, I'll likely make a few changes. I'll probably swap one Priority Requisition for a Corporate War and find a way to slot in Eli 1.0. I might also pull Viper for Viktor 1.0, as the traces tended to under-perform with the current prevalence of link boosting cards. I'm also sorely tempted by Flare, as being able to break the runner's rig in new and interesting ways sounds like fun.

But all of those ICE and traps require one thing: Money.

To paraphrase jopejope: Econ is king, and H-B is the king of econ.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Smithy

Wheaton
Illinois
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
single doubt wrote:
Another excellent write-up, jopejope. While I'm not much of a fan of H-B's theme, I love the way the corp plays. Economic domination can cause issues for even the most cash flush runner.

Our meta here in Chicago sees a whole lot of H-B Rush and Fast Advance decks, and they tend to be very successful if the runner isn't prepared to play the game out of their normal comfort zone (destroy the economy assets, regardless of the cost).

I've been a fan of H-B Super Server since the game's release, and while I'll try to play other corps/strategies, I always gravitate back to the big purple monster that is H-B. However, after several iterations and attempts, I've found that big ICE alone isn't enough, especially with things like Emergency Shutdown bouncing around. So I've been tuning a deck that works as a Super Server, but with a side of brutal punishment and pain. It works, especially if your opponent is expecting Rush/FA. It worked so well, I ended up squeaking into first place at the Dice Dojo Regional in Chicago. Here's the deck list (pre-Future Proof):

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Engineering the Future (Core)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (9)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
Priority Requisition (Core) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3

Asset: (9)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Aggressive Secretary (Core) x3
Melange Mining Corp (Core) x3

ICE: (21)
Heimdall 1.0 (Core) x2
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Janus 1.0 (What Lies Ahead) x2
Rototurret (Core) x3
Tollbooth (Core) x3 ■■
Viper (Cyber Exodus) x3
Wall of Static (Core) x3
Wall of Thorns (Core) x2 ■

Operation: (7)
Archived Memories (Core) x2
Hedge Fund (Core) x3
Precognition (Core) x2 ■■■

Upgrade: (3)
Corporate Troubleshooter (Core) x3

Total Agenda Points: 21

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 41
Jinteki: 8
NBN: 6
The Weyland Consortium: 0


No, I didn't spend all my influence. Heck, the Precognitions are mostly there to fill otherwise unused influence space. I know this game isn't that old, nor does it have a huge card pool, so I find it funny when I play a card and have my opponent say "What's that?!", especially when that something is Priority Requisition. Which, by the way, is pretty easy to score in this deck, since folks figure the only thing you'd install and double advance would be a trap. And sometimes it is a trap. I love Aggressive Secretary. This deck also sees the return of good old Corporate Troubleshooter, the reason I broke down and bought 3 core sets. It feels good to actually be using them. I just need to remember to use them correctly (I got trounced the first round of the tournament because I miscounted how much money I needed to spend to make Rototurret unbreakable and it threw me off my game).

With the advent of Future Proof, I'll likely make a few changes. I'll probably swap one Priority Requisition for a Corporate War and find a way to slot in Eli 1.0. I might also pull Viper for Viktor 1.0, as the traces tended to under-perform with the current prevalence of link boosting cards. I'm also sorely tempted by Flare, as being able to break the runner's rig in new and interesting ways sounds like fun.

But all of those ICE and traps require one thing: Money.

To paraphrase jopejope: Econ is king, and H-B is the king of econ.


And this is why I'm bringing Whizzard to the regionals on the 22th.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Billy Martin
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Kandiru wrote:
An excellent write up I would add the fourth style of HB deck though (which can be the most fun to play, but is often a little inconsistent: The Operation Recursion deck.


Of course these three aren't the only ways to play HB. I picked them because they're popular and they highlight the strength and style of HB. They're also perhaps the strongest, IMO, but obviously that's debatable.

The decklists I posted are very pure, in the sense that they really highlight the three styles and each one stays pretty firmly within that style. Many other HB decks actually begin with one of these three styles as a base, but add something to it. For example, Malefact's SE deck and BoShek's Hybrid deck.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Orange Devil
msg tools
This appears to be the HB thread, so let me annoy Jopejope by invalidating his thread title and throw in another HB decktype which he didn't discuss.

I'll take you through my deckbuilding process so maybe this article becomes more than just "hey this deck is alright you could play this" and more of a "how to build a(n unorthodox) corp deck".

This deck was built from the premise of "let's use that other ID and see where it takes us", so yes, this is a Stronger Together deck. Don't panic and keep reading. First thing we notice with this ID is that it locks us into taking basically as much Bioroid ice as we can. So knowing that, let's think of things Bioroids are good at. Bioroids are good at making the runner spend clicks. But wait, isn't that the downside of them for the corp? Well, yes, but we're going to try to turn that into our biggest advantage. Bioroids are also terribly cost effective for the runner to break with breakers, especially with the ST ID. Like, holy fuck are they ever cost effective, often needing the runner to spend equal or more than their rez cost to break.

Ok so, that 2nd advantage is obvious how to leverage: we need to force the runner to break our Bioroids with breakers as often as possible. To do that, we can do 3 things:
1. Stack em high, clicks can only get you through so many Bioroid subroutines before you need to start paying the big bucks. This tells us we need to be going for a big server style of play.
2. Hourglass and/or Viper and/or Enigma to waste runner clicks before they encounter Bioroids.
3. Play a long game where the runner needs to go through our Bioroids often. This tells us we need to try to slow the game down and play a good amount of assets and upgrades.

The first advantage is a little trickier to leverage, but we can think of some interactions where it is really good for us:
4. Ash. Unsurprisingly, this Bioroid upgrade is really, really good in combination with other Bioroids! Who knew right? They run, they use clicks to break your Bioroids, they pay a lot to break the remaining Bioroids, you do that thing with Ash and they can't run again. Unless they have Doppelganger I guess but then they have to go through the whole expensive Bioroid stack again so eh, probably won't work well for them. Also, early game we can take 1 or 2 bioroids with a total of 3 subroutines the runner wont want to deal with and try to score an agenda behind that using this same idea. To use Ash, we'll need an economic advantage though.
5. You know what is really good when the runner doesn't have clicks left to deal with them? Tags and the ice that give them. Something to think about.
6. The runner spending a lot of clicks to get through stuff really slows them down.

Ok so let's analyze where we are at. We want to play superserver (1,2) with lots of Bioroids and we want to play slow(3). Fortunately, Bioroids help us play slow(6), so that goes towards solving that problem. We'll want a bunch of assets and upgrades(3), and Ash(4) is really damn good here, so that fits well. We'll also want a ton of money(3,4). So we've combined all of our points here except 5. What could we do with tags? Realistically, the three cards we could consider are PSF, Scorched Earth and Closed Accounts. So let's do that.

We'll need some agendas anyway, and while we want our 6 2-for-3 agendas for sure because that way we can use our assets and upgrades(3) to bluff effectively we still have some room left. So, no matter what kind of tags we're doing, some PSF is definitely not bad. Closed Accounts really helps us get that economic advantage(3,4), but then again it might whiff. On the other hand, if the runner is that low and we manage to play slow, we should be in a really strong position anyway. We can also use the tags in conjunction with Closed Accounts to really screw up many runner economies relying on Kati Jones and such. Scorched Earth is the other option here. Firstly, let's be clear, given the influence costs and the deckspace, I am sure you need to choose one or the other, don't try to do both. Scorched Earth gives us an alternate win conditions. Scorched Earth works pretty well with Bioroids because a lot of Bioroids do brain damage which runners might find it economical to pick up here and there. I mean, whats the downside for them right? Nobody expects Scorched Earth out of HB, let alone out of this ID. So yeah, we can get away with only running 2 Scorched Earth and comboing it with brain damage, or just using it on a runner who didn't keep 4 cards because why would they? The tag hopefully comes as a big surprise when they already don't have any clicks left and bam, gamewin. Speaking of big surprise, Ichi's trace is often ignored and can deliver the tag PLUS a brain damage for our deadly combo in one go. I also went with Scorched because Criminals are dominant and especially against HB, they tend not to clear their Account Siphon tags. A game win off of those out of nowhere is just very fun and hopefully it'll mean Criminals will become a little warier about not clearing their tags. This all does clearly mean that our deck will suffer greatly from repeat plays. I thought all these interactions were pretty damn cool and unorthodox, so I chose to go with Scorched Earth for the rest of this deck.

Having put a lot of thought in this deck now, let's go actually build it. I tend to start with agendas and leave OOF for last. I also tend to build a giant deck with every card that supports its central premise and then cut down from there. My initial draft of this deck had 59 cards, which I knew was absolutely terrible because with only 2 Scorched you want 49 max so you can actually draw one. I still did it this way because it's better to have a 59 card deck you can play and get a feel for which cards you are happy to see in your hand and which ones you don't like so much than a half finished deck that you are intellectually stuck with.

Alright, agendas, 3x Beta Test, 3x Vitruvius gives us 12, we want 3 pointers because of the Ash thing talked about above and we really don't want to score 4 agendas with this deck if we can help it, as every score will be enough of a struggle as is. So, 2x Priority Requisition and 1x PSF. Getting a Priority Req on a Heimdall or Janus is pretty cool, so it's an easy choice over Exec Retreat. Similarly, we'll have a good number of ice and all of it is on the higher cost side, so beta test has the potential to be really really awesome. While we don't plan on relying on it, always keep it in mind as an option. If you pull 3 Bioroids out of a Beta Test, that's a huge momentum swing, no matter which 3 they are really.

Let's look at ice then. All the Bioroids are potentially good, so they go on the list. Hourglass is an easy include. Viper is kind of similar, and I made this deck like 2 packs ago, so it went on the list easily. While Ichi can deliver the tag, it is a little iffy to have only 1 delivery mechanism. We also are now looking at our potential ice list and whoah, this stuff is all pretty damn expensive. Fortunately, there's that trusty Shadow to help fix both those problems. It's main role is providing more economy. It can also work as a cost effective early game ice in case you don't draw anything else. Lastly, once everything else is ready, it can deliver that big surprise tag that wins us the game. Multi-role and not a waste if one role or the other doesn't pan out, it seems like a great include. Long story short (yeah right ) I did a bunch of testing and came out with the following ice: 2x Heimdall, 3x Ichi, 3x Viktor, 2x Janus, 2x Sherlock, 2x Hourglass, 3x Eli, 3x Shadow. I'll throw 3x Ash in here as well, because as jopejope has mentioned, it functions like ice.

Viper ended up getting cut when Eli came out because Eli is a really strong Bioroid I needed room for, they both serve that early-game-ice role, Viper just wasn't that great at standing in for Hourglass and something I didn't figure out until it happened to me: the deck got way too vulnerable to link, even just casual link to power Underworld Contacts or even just the 1 link on Kate and Andromeda. Dumping Viper helps mitigate this.

Enigma didn't make it because Yog is everywhere and that makes Enigma terrible, especially compared to a 4 strength Viktor.

Do note though, that while you do have 9 early game ice, you also have 7 midgame ice (Ichi, Sherlock and Hourglass) that are almost completely useless early on. Janus is also really damn hard to actually rez regularly, so all in all, a lot of dead ice early on. If the runner just refuses to install programs and insists on clicking through your early game stuff forever, things can get hairy pretty fast. This does slow the game way way way down though, so hopefully you can do something with that, at least. Best case scenario is those people plopping down an Opus very early on. Strength 5 Ichi and strength 6 Sherlock can be really strong and expensive to deal with.

Last two tricks to note. If you get ahead economically and the runner has no code gate breaker, Hourglass + Ash + Agenda = a scored agenda. Similarly, Hourglass on HQ against Criminals with Scorched in hand, wait for the Siphon to rez, then hope you get that win.

It should be clear to you now that what we want to do is pretty expensive, so we'll need a bunch of economy and as much of it in assets and upgrades as possible. However, our early game is also expensive and we cannot guarantee keeping the runner out of our assets. We don't want them to just trash our entire economy, so we will need some operations as well. We're also doing superserver, so we need transient economy assets rather than permanents like PAD. The usual suspects quickly show up: Hedge Fund, Green Level Clearance, Adonis Campaign and Melange, 3 each. We've also got those Shadows to help out here. My initial list included Dedicated Servers and Akitaro. The Dedicated Servers didn't make it because there just wasn't the influence and they are not optimal with superserver. There was room for a single copy of Akitaro to round out the influence however, and when he shows up at the right time it is amazing. A general note about GLC, it increases your reliability at doing everything EXCEPT Beta Testing if you use it as an excuse to go a smidgen lighter on ice, which people tend to do.

We've got those 2 Scorched which I'm sure you'll remember, and then that's the entire decklist except for 2 cards and 2 influence. A weakness the astute reader might have picked up on during reading all this is that the ice order of installation is damn important for this deck. If you install a Bioroid in front of an Hourglass, you allow the runner to dump his clicks on that Bioroid to pass both ice for free. This is really bad. And yet, Hourglass sometimes stands in for early game ice. And while sometimes Hourglass can work even the wrong way around (for example a Shadow - Hourglass server), or a Bioroid - Hourglass server on a central preventing the runner from running on their last click and getting through the Hourglass for free and they don't want to spend a whole bunch of clicks just to see 1 card, it's all pretty cornercase and eventually just a big waste of that Hourglass. That same Hourglass which is a key card to make your big Bioroid stacks expensive. Similarly, we really want Shadow all the way on the inside of a stack of Bioroid ice. We want them to know about the possibility of being tagged only after they've spent all their clicks and after they've spent their money breaking the expensive Bioroids and thus hopefully can't or won't break the Shadow or beat the trace. In general also our big ice wants to find itself unrezzed on the inside of a big server, as there it can do the most economic (and brain) damage to the runner. If it's on the outside they see they can't break the whole server anymore and jack out with little loss. If it's on the inside, they already paid a ton and now they find out it's all for nothing. Much better. We also greatly prefer at least 1 ETR subroutine inside of our Ichis and Sherlocks, because that way, if one of the Ichi or Sherlock routines fire, we can use it to get rid of the breaker that could carry the runner through that ETR subroutine. Sunset solves all 4 of these problems, and as such we want 2 copies.

Let me then now post the complete decklist just so it's all in one place, and let me then talk a bit about how it does and cards that didn't make it but wouldn't be bad.

Deck Created with CardGameDB.com Android: Netrunner Deck Builder

Identity:
Haas-Bioroid: Stronger Together (What Lies Ahead)


Total Cards: (49)

Agenda: (9)
Accelerated Beta Test (Core) x3
Project Vitruvius (Cyber Exodus) x3
Priority Requisition (Core) x2
Private Security Force (Core) x1

Asset: (6)
Adonis Campaign (Core) x3
Melange Mining Corp (Core) x3

ICE: (20)
Eli 1.0 (Future Proof) x3
Heimdall 1.0 (Core) x2
Hourglass (A Study in Static) x2
Ichi 1.0 (Core) x3
Janus 1.0 (What Lies Ahead) x2
Sherlock 1.0 (Trace Amount) x2
Viktor 1.0 (Core) x3
Shadow (Core) x3 ■

Operation: (10)
Green Level Clearance (A Study in Static) x3
Hedge Fund (Core) x3
Sunset (Cyber Exodus) x2 ■
Scorched Earth (Core) x2 ■■■■

Upgrade: (4)
Ash 2X3ZB9CY (What Lies Ahead) x3
Akitaro Watanabe (Core) x1 ■■

Total Agenda Points: 20

Influence Values Totals -
Haas-Bioroid: 48
Jinteki: 4
NBN: 0
The Weyland Consortium: 11



So how did it do? Well, given how much people hate on the ID based on OCTGN player stats (in the last month or so, I'm pretty sure I've been the only player playing this ID), it's done surprisingly well actually. I'm pretty sure before this last pack came out I've won more than I lost, even against some good players. Scorched Earth can be a real surprise, and is responsible for a good chunk of wins. Even without that though, so long as you don't draw too many agendas early, you tend to do alright. Even when I didn't win, I've tended to score 2-4 points reliably, so it really felt like a proper HB deck. You are really really dependent on getting the agendas late enough to first set up, but not so late that you can't do anything with em anymore though. Also, with the latest pack, I just don't think this deck can work anymore. Between Faerie and R&D interface and just the general increased efficiency of the runner, it feels like it might've become impossible for this corp to get ahead economically. I feel like the decklist I just posted is dead. However, if you can tweak it to get some extra tempo, for example by cutting both Janus and adding in either 2x Eve Campaign or 2x Private Contracts, who knows? It might work alright again. Speaking of those 2 cards, they both could totally fit this deck, there just wasn't room. I feel like Private Contracts is probably preferable because it's easier to use early game and also easier to clear out of a server to make room for agendas/the next economy asset. Eve is a bit more efficient at credit gain provided she lasts all the way till the end, however. Other cards that give this deck some tempo, such as the new 2.0 Bioroids coming in the box, or maybe Awakening Center, or who knows what else, could give this deck the little boost it needs to work again, and I look very much forward to reviving it once that box is out.

So, other cards that didn't make it.
Archived Memories would be nice, keep that big remote occupied at all times with those economy assets is pretty good. Extra Ash usages pretty good. Noise protection (except workshop shenanigans) against this deck? Pretty good. Another way to win using Scorched Earth, pretty good. All in all, pretty good, just no room.

Rework would be great for the consistency of this deck, because you really can't do much with early agendas and they can lead to very easy losses. Again, just can't find room.

Aggressive Secretary could work, though it goes against your main bluffing of just installing cards with nothing on em, it does bluff those 3 pointers. People also tend to not like to Infiltrate against this deck, partially because people tend to be cutting it in general (shame, all of you), partially because people want every click they can get during their runs. That said, killing their breakers isn't as good here as elsewhere, since Bioroids can always be broken. Also we already have a bunch of program destruction on ice, so do we really want more?

Ruhr Valley I think is just too expensive for what it does right now, maybe once the big box is out. Maybe.

Edge of World could work really well. You want a giant remote. People aren't suspicious if you don't rez a bunch of stuff because they know all your shit is expensive to rez (and often play economy denial specifically due to that) or doesn't do anything until they have programs (and often don't install any due to that), so when they run your 3-4 deep server and only 1 ice ends up rezzed, or no ice ends up rezzed vs Inside Job or simply because they ran on the first click, against this ID, nobody is suspicious. I mean, often a runner runs me with not enough creds to trash whatever is actually in that server and I don't rez anything even with a big bank. They always access. And then boom, 3-4 brain damage. Could be good. Could even be good enough that it doesn't need to be combined with Scorched, as having a tiny handsize sucks all on its own, and now every face down installed card is potentially lethal. Even if they get advanced, what if that asshole is running Junebugs too? Can't afford any other brain damage from Stimhacks or letting Bioroids go off anymore either.

Anyway, I'm done with this deck for now, and tinkering around with some other stuff before I try the Closed Accounts version or revive this once the box comes out. So I'll leave it up as an exercise for the reader to either tweak this list into something with enough tempo to be relevant in the new meta, or devise their own Closed Accounts based deck list. I expect the first step for the latter would be dumping the Scorched Earths and adding 2x Closed Accounts and 2x Edge of World.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   |