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Subject: Id like clarification on a few things... rss

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Jesse Smit
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Hi, I THINK ive gotten to the stage where im playing this interesting game correctly but theres a couple of points im not 100% sure on. I think im doing it right but i just have these niggling doubts.

1)When you perform cavalry pursuit on a wide approach using 2 cavalry pieces, does the attacker take one step loss or one step loss per piece (ie 2 step losses)? Im pretty sure its the former (1 step loss).

2)When you perform an assault, you can choose to have only some of the blocking pieces involved. If you lose the assault do all the pieces at the approach have to pull back into reserve or only those involved in the assault? Im pretty sure its only those involved in the assault.

3)Do all assaults have to be declared AND resolved before any movement occurs? Im pretty sure this is a yes but the rules could be clearer on it. And what if you assault, win the attack, and then perform cavalry continuation? That doesnt count as movement right?

Thanks
 
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mateybob wrote:
1)When you perform cavalry pursuit on a wide approach using 2 cavalry pieces, does the attacker take one step loss or one step loss per piece (ie 2 step losses)? Im pretty sure its the former (1 step loss).

The rulebook says:

"If a cavalry pursuit was declared, the strength is calculated. This is done by adding the strengths of the pursuing cavalry pieces together, and subtracting from that the terrain penalty of the approach occupied by the [enemy]"

and then

"The pursuing cavalry takes a loss of one strength point (this comes from the cavalry pieces carrying out the pursuit, not the pieces leading the assault). The enemy pieces take a loss equal to the cavalry pursuit strength."

So if two full-strength cav pursue across an approach with a 1 point cav penalty, the pursuit strength is three. The enemy pieces lose three steps, and my interpretation is that the pursuing cavalry takes one step total (i.e. only one block is reduced). This makes sense intuitively, as i) the cav penalty is applied only once, and ii) it would be a bit weird if doubling your forces against a given strength of enemy also doubled your losses.

mateybob wrote:
2)When you perform an assault, you can choose to have only some of the blocking pieces involved. If you lose the assault do all the pieces at the approach have to pull back into reserve or only those involved in the assault? Im pretty sure its only those involved in the assault.

I think it's just those involved in the attack. The rulebook says:

"If the assault was won by the defender, then the surviving attacking pieces withdraw into reserve in the locale from which they were attacking" (emphasis mine)

mateybob wrote:
3)Do all assaults have to be declared AND resolved before any movement occurs? Im pretty sure this is a yes but the rules could be clearer on it. And what if you assault, win the attack, and then perform cavalry continuation? That doesnt count as movement right?

All assaults occur before movement is declared -- the sequence of play is pretty clear about it. And cav can use continuation after an assult:

"If the assault was won by the attacker, [...] the attacking pieces advance into reserve in the locale they assaulted, after which any attacking cavalry may use continuation."

I take this continuation to be part of assault rather than movement, as it is resolved in the assault phase (same as retreats from a successful assault).

Let me know if you want to meet up for a game of BaM sometime and we can figure it out as we go. I live in Newtown.
 
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Was George Orwell an Optimist?
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I agree with Phil's answers, but would like to add some additional fine points.

First, approach width determines the number of leading units in an assault. It has nothing to do with how many cavalry could conduct pursuit after a successful assault - theoretically you could have a situation where 6 cavalry could pursue after an infantry assault across a narrow approach. If they were all 2s, they would lose 1 step and inflict 12 additional loss steps on the defeated force.

Second, continuation after a successful assault would indeed happen as each assault is concluded, before regular movement, but saying it is part of the assault might be misleading in terms of command points required.

The assault requires 1 cp, and the advancing units pay no more as long as they all remain together. However, if some remain in the captured area's reserve, while others continue to an approach in that area, an additional command point would be expended.

Again pushing an example to the theoretical limit, a force that assaults successfully, then advances some units to the captured area's reserve, plus splits cavalry to continue to two separate approaches, would expend all three command points available for the turn.
 
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Garry Haggerty
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Sphere wrote:
First, approach width determines the number of leading units in an assault. It has nothing to do with how many cavalry could conduct pursuit after a successful assault...


Actually, approach width does affect the number of pursuing cavalry allowed:

"The maximum number is one if the attacked approach is narrow, two if wide."
 
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Was George Orwell an Optimist?
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Oops - now that's embarrassing!

Thanks, Garry. I've had that wrong in my head for some time now. Re-reading, I also see that you can't pursue if either the defender's or the attacker's side of the approach is cavalry obstructed. I didn't have that straight in my mind, either.
 
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Rachel Simmons
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mateybob wrote:
1)When you perform cavalry pursuit on a wide approach using 2 cavalry pieces, does the attacker take one step loss or one step loss per piece (ie 2 step losses)? Im pretty sure its the former (1 step loss).

2)When you perform an assault, you can choose to have only some of the blocking pieces involved. If you lose the assault do all the pieces at the approach have to pull back into reserve or only those involved in the assault? Im pretty sure its only those involved in the assault.

3)Do all assaults have to be declared AND resolved before any movement occurs? Im pretty sure this is a yes but the rules could be clearer on it. And what if you assault, win the attack, and then perform cavalry continuation? That doesnt count as movement right?


(1) The 1 step loss is per assault, not per piece.

(2) Only those involved in the assault.

(3) All assaults must be completed before any movement. Continuation in an assault is part of the assault, not part of movement.
 
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John Boone
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Continuing on with the cavalry pursuit theme, say an attacker only commits 2 out of 4 units occupying an approach to an assault and that he loses the assault and loses both units (assume it was a two wide approach) in the assault. Can the defender declare a cavalry pursuit (assuming he had the units to do so) if all the assaulting pieces were eliminated and there are still enemy units occupying the approach that did not participate in the assault inorder to damage the non-committed units in the approach?
 
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Rachel Simmons
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jwboone wrote:
Continuing on with the cavalry pursuit theme, say an attacker only commits 2 out of 4 units occupying an approach to an assault and that he loses the assault and loses both units (assume it was a two wide approach) in the assault. Can the defender declare a cavalry pursuit (assuming he had the units to do so) if all the assaulting pieces were eliminated and there are still enemy units occupying the approach that did not participate in the assault inorder to damage the non-committed units in the approach?


No:

"An assault can result in losses for the at-tacking or defending pieces, as a result of artil-lery defense, the assault resolution, or cavalry pursuit. ... If the required loss is greater than the strength of the pieces participating in the attack, the extra losses are ignored – losses in an assault are never applied to pieces not participating in the attack."
 
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Darryl Auston
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I think the question is: Can the defenders perform a cavalry pursuit on the 2 remaining pieces that did not participate in the assault?
 
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Jesse Smit
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Thanks for the replies people. Looks like ive been playing it right.laugh
 
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Rachel Simmons
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dauston wrote:
I think the question is: Can the defenders perform a cavalry pursuit on the 2 remaining pieces that did not participate in the assault?


No. They are not participants in the assault, and assault losses (from the assault resolution, defensive fire, or cavalry pursuit) cannot be assessed against them (see the rule quoted earlier in the thread).
 
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