Recommend
60 
 Thumb up
 Hide
144 Posts
1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [6] | 

Wargames» Forums » General

Subject: Wargaming Eras rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rather than generic "Golden Age" and "Silver Age" discussions, I'm trying to categorize wargaming years based on more significant distinctions.

I've come up with a basic outline, below. But I'd like to get additional feedback, corrections or suggestions.


1958-1969 - The Classic Years - Avalon Hill is pretty much the only game in town as commercial board wargaming is born.

1969-1974 - The S&T Years - Strategy & Tactics Magazine begins including a game with every issue. Proliferation of wargames explodes.

1974-1981 - The Monster Wargame Years - An age of excess in wargaming, as more and bigger (though not necessarily better) games are published.

1982-1988 - The Post-SPI Years - The wargame landscape fills the void left by SPI's demise.

1989-1994 - Rise of the Machines - Computer graphics and design emerge with new game companies such as The Gamers and--later--GMT Games.

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.

1999-2004 - Re-Alignment - Wargaming again fills in for a fallen industry giant.

2005-2009 - Simplify - Weuros and DTP games rise in popularity and availability.

2010-present - Best of Both Worlds - Classic design concepts and modern design mechanics both prove successful in designs from both major and minor publishers. Amateur design quality improves and now rivals those from major publishers.



I welcome discussion on this. Thanks for taking the time to read this.
55 
 Thumb up
1.60
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Morris
United States
Raytown
Missouri
flag msg tools
2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin, 19th Indiana, 24th Michigan
badge
24th Michigan Monument Gettysburg Pa
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Avalon Hill's demise shook up the gaming world. There simply was no other wargame publisher that was capable of picking up the ball on the run. Avalon Hill had such a strangle hold on the market there literally was no number two company to step in. Instead there were CCGs and euros.

Game stores suddenly had shelf space to fill. They did that with collectable card games and euros. Both genres in a very short time became the bread and butter of stores that use to be Avalon Hill filled stores. It took about 5 years before MMP, GMT and other game publishers were able to reach a point where they could start producing games to the level that Avalon Hill was and then a few more years before they could do so consistently. I would say the wargame market took about 7 years to recover which would put it at 2005. Dead on with your timeline.

I don't think we'll ever see another Avalon Hill in the hobby or at least I hope not. I think the hobby is much stronger with multiple companies competing than one big one owning as much of the market place as Avalon Hill did. Even as big and strong as GMT is there are a lot of other wargame publishers out there as well as the Ameritrash, eurogame and card game publishers.

It's funny because when Avalon Hill died in 1998 I thought the hobby was done and buried. I thought CCGs were the thing and I didn't care for them. I moved to KC in 1999 and by chance in around 2003 I was talking to a clerk at a Barnes & Noble in the military history section. I made mention that I was into wargames before Avalon Hill died and he told me about a game store close by that carried not card games but wargames. The hobby was alive! Been back into wargaming ever since.
33 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martí Cabré

Terrassa
Catalonia, Spain
msg tools
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Barcelona_(1713–14)
badge
https://spanishpolice.github.io
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
You could use more epic and chrome in the titles: The pioneers, Age of heroes, When monsters ruled, Apocalypto, The new wave, The independent scene, etc.
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Arthur
Australia
New South Wales
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

You missed out the Age of Chadwick...basically corresponding to the Age of Discovery in the History of the World..
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Vista
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wait... there have been wargames published since 1981?
17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mrbeankc wrote:
Avalon Hill's demise shook up the gaming world. There simply was no other wargame publisher that was capable of picking up the ball on the run. Avalon Hill had such a strangle hold on the market there literally was no number two company to step in. Instead there were CCGs and euros.

Game stores suddenly had shelf space to fill. They did that with collectable card games and euros. Both genres in a very short time became the bread and butter of stores that use to be Avalon Hill filled stores. It took about 5 years before MMP, GMT and other game publishers were able to reach a point where they could start producing games to the level that Avalon Hill was and then a few more years before they could do so consistently. I would say the wargame market took about 7 years to recover which would put it at 2005. Dead on with your timeline.

I don't think we'll ever see another Avalon Hill in the hobby or at least I hope not. I think the hobby is much stronger with multiple companies competing than one big one owning as much of the market place as Avalon Hill did. Even as big and strong as GMT is there are a lot of other wargame publishers out there as well as the Ameritrash, eurogame and card game publishers.

It's funny because when Avalon Hill died in 1998 I thought the hobby was done and buried. I thought CCGs were the thing and I didn't care for them. I moved to KC in 1999 and by chance in around 2003 I was talking to a clerk at a Barnes & Noble in the military history section. I made mention that I was into wargames before Avalon Hill died and he told me about a game store close by that carried not card games but wargames. The hobby was alive! Been back into wargaming ever since.


My gaming life experience parallels yours very much. It was agonizing waiting for other wargame publishers to fill in the void left by Avalon Hill in the retail distribution pipeline.
6 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff K
United States
Garner
North Carolina
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
J.L.Robert wrote:

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.


This is a very nice succinct summary. But I am questioning this entry above. Was the rise of the CDG indeed due to card collectible craze? This has been noted before, but Mark Herman (of course the progenitor of the genre) denies that CCGs influenced his introduction of cards into the wargame genre.

I would tend to buy that because the cards are used in such a distinct manner from the way they are used in CCGs. The only relation that I can see is the physical form of the card. Beyond that any relationship is tenuous at best, as I see it.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam D.
United States
Suquamish
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Interesting topic, thanks for putting this together.

A few observations:

* "weuro"?

* Not sure 74-81 could really be categorized as solely as the big games. There was a lot more stuff going on than that at the time. Like the rise of D&D inspiring fantasy/SciFi games and a proliferation of second tier organizations like GDW and Yaquinto.

* Rise of the Machines doesn't really sum up the post SPI period for me either since some of the most interesting "SPI" output came out of Victory Games if you ask me. So it was in some ways a flowering of talent that was trained under or heavily influenced by Dunnigan and Simonsen.

* As for the first comment, were game stores really stocked so much with AH games they couldn't fill shelf space? That seems unlikely to me, but there weren't a ton of them around where I lived at the time. Although I do recall comic book stores branching out into CCGs.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
"L'état, c'est moi."
Canada
Vancouver
BC
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Roger's Reviews: check out my reviews page, right here on BGG!
badge
Caution: May contain wargame like substance
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Neopeius wrote:
Wait... there have been wargames published since 1981?

I think this sentiment sums up 99.44% of the discussion in our little corner of BGG.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Xookliba wrote:
J.L.Robert wrote:

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.


This is a very nice succinct summary. But I am questioning this entry above. Was the rise of the CDG indeed due to card collectible craze? This has been noted before, but Mark Herman (of course the progenitor of the genre) denies that CCGs influenced his introduction of cards into the wargame genre.

I would tend to buy that because the cards are used in such a distinct manner from the way they are used in CCGs. The only relation that I can see is the physical form of the card. Beyond that any relationship is tenuous at best, as I see it.


It might not have influenced Herman himself. But the industry paradigm shift certainly saw the impact of card-based play in all of gaming, not just in collectibles or wargames. In some sense, the wargaming industry could have been on the cutting edge of game design had it embraced cardplay mechanics more openly during this period.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
TheCollector wrote:
* "weuro"?


Euro-games with war-themed mechanics, or light wargames that appeal to the non-wargaming market.

TheCollector wrote:
* Not sure 74-81 could really be categorized as solely as the big games. There was a lot more stuff going on than that at the time. Like the rise of D&D inspiring fantasy/SciFi games and a proliferation of second tier organizations like GDW and Yaquinto.


Of course the period was not exclusively the domain of monster games. But "monster" could also be a metaphor for something out of control, such as the wargame industry itself. In addition to large games, there seemed to be an explosion of game titles. The rush to publish at the time left us with many games of dubious quality.

TheCollector wrote:
* Rise of the Machines doesn't really sum up the post SPI period for me either since some of the most interesting "SPI" output came out of Victory Games if you ask me. So it was in some ways a flowering of talent that was trained under or heavily influenced by Dunnigan and Simonsen.


See the previous era that I had listed. The late 80's and early 90's saw the first computer-generated graphics in wargames, from the first titles from The Gamers, to the ill-fated Fresno Gaming Associates, to the birth of GMT.

TheCollector wrote:
* As for the first comment, were game stores really stocked so much with AH games they couldn't fill shelf space? That seems unlikely to me, but there weren't a ton of them around where I lived at the time. Although I do recall comic book stores branching out into CCGs.


Of course not. However, for several years, wargamers who relied on brick and mortar stores for games had much difficulty obtaining new titles while GMT, Columbia, The Gamers/MMP and others began to penetrate the retail distribution chain to take up the slack left behind by AH's closure. Today's smaller scale of retail operations and the hobby's now near-dependence on online retailing have not only alleviated this, it has opened up the consumer market to many more publishers and game catalogs that may otherwise have never been able to show up on retail shelves.

Thanks for the comments.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Enrico Viglino
United States
Eugene
OR
flag msg tools
Slowed - BGG's moderation policies have driven me partially from here
badge
http://thegamebox.byethost15.com/smf/
Avatar
mb
mrbeankc wrote:
Avalon Hill's demise shook up the gaming world. There simply was no other wargame publisher that was capable of picking up the ball on the run. Avalon Hill had such a strangle hold on the market there literally was no number two company to step in. Instead there were CCGs and euros.


Yes and no. When I found out, it was no big shock. They were far and
away the biggest company, but they weren't doing much of anything
either. Their fall seemed merely the last gasp of an already dead hobby.

The stores I frequented around that era didn't carry much AH stuff
either. It didn't sell, because they still were only putting out a
couple games a year, and the hobby wasn't growing. All the people
in the hobby HAD the AH games they wanted. I saw things like GMT,
and 3W taking up more space already.


Quote:
It's funny because when Avalon Hill died in 1998 I thought the hobby was done and buried.


Definitely. But, there were clearly some interesting companies that
would keep a niche market alive. Never assumed things would get
as healthy as they have now though.

7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Hoyt

Butte
Montana
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great summary, very enjoyable to revisit all that.

One company I think deserves mention, Gamma2/Columbia Games. I don't know what year they started, but Quebec was published in 1972. So how about some respect for a company that has been going strong for at least 40 some years? And through almost all of the eras you mentioned?
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Enrico Viglino
United States
Eugene
OR
flag msg tools
Slowed - BGG's moderation policies have driven me partially from here
badge
http://thegamebox.byethost15.com/smf/
Avatar
mb
Xookliba wrote:
J.L.Robert wrote:

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.


This is a very nice succinct summary. But I am questioning this entry above. Was the rise of the CDG indeed due to card collectible craze? This has been noted before, but Mark Herman (of course the progenitor of the genre) denies that CCGs influenced his introduction of cards into the wargame genre.


He's come in to say there was no direct conscious influence.
But it's hard to believe that the huge popularity coming at
a time when the game was first being designed didn't influence things.

A LOT of games experimenting with the use of cards came out all at
once soon after MtG hit the scene.


5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ROGER DEAL
United States
Oak Ridge
Tennessee
flag msg tools
badge
Kenneth Deal WW 2 Belgium 1944/45
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"Weuros" How is that pronounced?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff K
United States
Garner
North Carolina
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
calandale wrote:
Xookliba wrote:
J.L.Robert wrote:

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.


This is a very nice succinct summary. But I am questioning this entry above. Was the rise of the CDG indeed due to card collectible craze? This has been noted before, but Mark Herman (of course the progenitor of the genre) denies that CCGs influenced his introduction of cards into the wargame genre.


He's come in to say there was no direct conscious influence.
But it's hard to believe that the huge popularity coming at
a time when the game was first being designed didn't influence things.



(My emphasis). Yeah, I think this is really a key observation. He did not set out to copy MtG, and indeed the card use is completely different. But I could see how you could conclude that because card games were popping up everywhere, and cards did serve the design purpose he was looking for.

It kind of reminds me of Tolkien's famous statements about allegory. He said he despised allegory in all its forms and LotR was not an allegory. And yet, the story was conceived during WWII, which was an event so pervasive in consciousness that it could hardly be escaped. It is difficult to see how an event such as that could not shape your thinking. And LotR does mirror that struggle, among other things.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
blockhead wrote:
Great summary, very enjoyable to revisit all that.

One company I think deserves mention, Gamma2/Columbia Games. I don't know what year they started, but Quebec was published in 1972. So how about some respect for a company that has been going strong for at least 40 some years? And through almost all of the eras you mentioned?


This is a summary of the primary industry trends. Not a roll call of every wargame publisher over the past 60 years.

Gamma 2/Columbia may have been around all this time, but they've never been a mover or shaker in the industry. They've found their niche within the niche. And while wargaming as a whole is better off for their existence, I'd never call them a company that drove the entire hobby.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Leo Zappa
United States
Aliquippa
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
J.L.Robert wrote:
Rather than generic "Golden Age" and "Silver Age" discussions, I'm trying to categorize wargaming years based on more significant distinctions.

I've come up with a basic outline, below. But I'd like to get additional feedback, corrections or suggestions.


1958-1969 - The Classic Years - Avalon Hill is pretty much the only game in town as commercial board wargaming is born.

1969-1974 - The S&T Years - Strategy & Tactics Magazine begins including a game with every issue. Proliferation of wargames explodes.

1974-1981 - The Monster Wargame Years - An age of excess in wargaming, as more and bigger (though not necessarily better) games are published.

1982-1988 - The Post-SPI Years - The wargame landscape fills the void left by SPI's demise.

1989-1994 - Rise of the Machines - Computer graphics and design emerge with new game companies such as The Gamers and--later--GMT Games.

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.

1999-2004 - Re-Alignment - Wargaming again fills in for a fallen industry giant.

2005-2009 - Simplify - Weuros and DTP games rise in popularity and availability.

2010-present - Best of Both Worlds - Classic design concepts and modern design mechanics both prove successful in designs from both major and minor publishers. Amateur design quality improves and now rivals those from major publishers.



I welcome discussion on this. Thanks for taking the time to read this.


Hi J.L. - I've thought of this kind of description of the timeline of wargaming as well. Rather than critique your timeline, I thought I might post mine, and then perhaps elements from each could be merged or discussed. Mine would be similar to yours but go something like this:

1958 - 1965 The Early Years - Avalon Hill invents the hobby of commercial wargames. Classics like Gettysburg, Battle of the Bulge, and Afrika Korps are published. In house designers are responsible for these first games.

1966 - 1969 Dawn of Dunnigan - Avalon Hill begins to shift towards looking outwards for new designs, and Jim Dunnigan produces designs such as 1914 and Jutland, ushering in a new appreciation for simulationist thinking. This opens the eyes of many wargamers and wargame designers!

1970 - 1980 The True Golden Age of Wargaming - SPI is founded and launches a magazine with a game in every issue! New companies such as GDW, Battleline, Jedko, Conflict, and others were founded and created a plethora of new games. Tactical gaming exploded on the scene with the advent of Panzerblitz, which broke all wargaming sales records. Concurrently, other hobby gaming developments, such as the rise of role playing games (exemplified by Dungeons and Dragons) also came onto the scene. Increasingly, wargames were complex affairs which could not be finished in one sitting.

1981 - 1993 The Post-SPI Era - With the folding of SPI, the first golden age of wargaming came to an end. Many in the industry began to decry the dominance of large, complex, long-playing games in the hobby. Many of the remaining companies made great noises about how the industry needed "introductory games" or simpler games, harkening back to the early days of the hobby. Meanwhile, from the ashes of SPI rose Victory Games, which combined the design staff of SPI with the quality control and business savvy of Avalon Hill. Role playing continued to expand. Avalon Hill itself, beyond the Victory effort, also continued to buy up other's designs and near the end of this era, introduced the concept of the "card driven games" with Hannibal and We the People.

1993 - 2000 The Dark Ages - The fall of the Avalon Hillian empire came as an unexpected shock to many, and left a great void in the hobby. AH had been the dominant player in the industry from the start, and with its departure, the single biggest driving force in the hobby was gone. This was a time when many wargamers who had been playing since the 60's or 70's thought that the hobby was dead, and many, including this author, moved away from the hobby. Many fled to the new land of video and PC games. Others found interest in the new craze of collectible card games, foremost amongst which was MtG. However, several new companies, such as The Gamers and GMT were founded and would eventually lead the way out of the darkness.

2001 - 2013 The Second Coming of Wargaming - New advances in computer aided boardgame design, coupled with pent-up demand for board wargames and a growing disillusionment with the electronic world of gaming (as turn based historical games gave way to a flood of dumbed down first person shooters) led to the rebirth of the wargaming hobby. Led by companies like GMT, MMP, Avalance, Decision, and a host of others, wargames were back. However, these were not necessarily your father's wargames. While many still used the traditional hex-n-counter/ZOC/CRT approach, many others expanded the horizons with use of new or reinvented mechanics (some of which, while first developed in the 70's or 80's, had not come into widespread use until now, like card-driven play, area or point to point maps, buckets of dice combat resolution, and the use of minis or blocks in lieu of cardboard counters). The rise of the Internet and the founding of websites like BGG and CSW also greatly increased the ability of wargamers and wargame designers to communicate with one another, accelerating the spread of new ideas and informing wargamers of new games. The development of VASSAL as an on-line game hosting service also opened up new opportunities for wargamers to play their favorites with other gamers around the world!

This is how I've viewed the wargaming world from my perspective.
34 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Enrico Viglino
United States
Eugene
OR
flag msg tools
Slowed - BGG's moderation policies have driven me partially from here
badge
http://thegamebox.byethost15.com/smf/
Avatar
mb
Xookliba wrote:
calandale wrote:
Xookliba wrote:
J.L.Robert wrote:

1994-1998 - New Age Wargaming - Game design begins a radical shift towards card play, in part due to the entire hobby's shift with the rise of collectible card games.


This is a very nice succinct summary. But I am questioning this entry above. Was the rise of the CDG indeed due to card collectible craze? This has been noted before, but Mark Herman (of course the progenitor of the genre) denies that CCGs influenced his introduction of cards into the wargame genre.


He's come in to say there was no direct conscious influence.
But it's hard to believe that the huge popularity coming at
a time when the game was first being designed didn't influence things.



(My emphasis). Yeah, I think this is really a key observation. He did not set out to copy MtG, and indeed the card use is completely different. But I could see how you could conclude that because card games were popping up everywhere, and cards did serve the design purpose he was looking for.


In fact, the influence MAY have been that MtG showed that
decent quality cards could be made-to-order cheaply enough.
But, no one would have noticed if the game didn't take GenCon
by storm the way nothing had before.

5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
J.L.Robert wrote:

1982-1988 - The Post-SPI Years - The wargame landscape fills the void left by SPI's demise.


I think I would call this the "Victory Games years". Mark Herman and a bunch of SPI designers put out those games that had far better production than SPI and more detail than Avalon Hill. It gave us some of the preeminent games of the time, such as The Civil War, Vietnam 1965-1975, The Korean War, Gulf Strike, which are probably the single best strategic-level games of each respective war that all others are measured against. They also kicked out gems like Ambush!, Lee vs. Grant, Hell's Highway, Carrier, and Pacific War: The Struggle Against Japan 1941-1945 -- almost all of them coming from 1982-86! To me, that defined that era more than anything else.
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Enrico Viglino
United States
Eugene
OR
flag msg tools
Slowed - BGG's moderation policies have driven me partially from here
badge
http://thegamebox.byethost15.com/smf/
Avatar
mb
airjudden wrote:
J.L.Robert wrote:

1982-1988 - The Post-SPI Years - The wargame landscape fills the void left by SPI's demise.


I think I would call this the "Victory Games years". Mark Herman and a bunch of SPI games put out those games that had far better production than SPI and more detail than Avalon Hill. It gave us some of the preeminent games of the time, such as The Civil War, Vietnam 1965-1975, The Korean War, Gulf Strike, and which are probably the single strategic-level games of each respective war that all others are measured against. They also kicked out gems like Ambush!, Lee vs. Grant, Hell's Highway, Carrier, and Pacific War: The Struggle Against Japan 1941-1945 -- almost all of them coming from 1982-86! To me, that defined that era more than anything else.


VG was certainly part of 'post-SPI'. So too would be TSR's ownership
of the SPI brand, and the games that came out in it. Even AH shows some
effort to take up the SPI banner in some ways. You also have the growth
of the other magazine titles in this era.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Vista
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think 1990- today should be the "Warhammer Era"

If I go to a gaming store, invariably everyone is playing with miniatures.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
What about "The rise of Vassal?"
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Hanning
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
flag msg tools
badge
We will meet at the Hour of Scampering.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mrbeankc wrote:
Avalon Hill's demise shook up the gaming world.


Huh. It was several years after that before I even realized they weren't there anymore. They published so few games every year, that the store shelves pretty much held the same AH games, year after year.

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chad
United States
Denver
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
We will bury you
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
J.L.Robert wrote:
1974-1981 - The Monster Wargame Years - An age of excess in wargaming, as more and bigger (though not necessarily better) games are published


This is one that I have issue with - Squad Leader came out in 1977 - right in the middle of this error - and to my mind, this was one of the ground shaking releases (effectively popularizing the tactical wargame)

Sure, there were the Wacht am Rhein and The Campaign for North Africa - but I associate it more to some of the foundations (i.e. Panzer Leader or Squad Leader)


Quote:

I welcome discussion on this. Thanks for taking the time to read this.


Great discussion topic - and certainly easier to cast stones than create it from scratch - much appreciated.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [6] | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.