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Subject: General OVERVIEW of the Contents rss

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Robert Wesley
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"A Book of Sandhurst Wargames"

...was an attempt by the "Royal Military Academy" at 'Sandhurst' in "England", and its then current members of the "Sandhurst Wargamer Club", to bring various 'gaming' techniques to the forefront. They even went so far as to provide further background materials delving upon the topics of which this spans, within a "cross section" of the GAMES included with this. As such, then with its "scope" for which it covered these, along with the timeline-(1982) of its publication, many others have "evolved" since then, with unrealized potentials NOW, that weren't available back then, as a result. There are cursory mentions upon the likes of "D&D", "miniatures" gaming, the evolution of "Wargaming" from its inception, to the then 'present'-(1982), and even a smattering of "computer" gaming conceptualizations are taken into account, such as along the lines of the 'Military' applications for that. With its inclusion of the '4'-GAMES herein, then EACH of these alone, should have garnered their very OWN distinct "booklet", in which to provide them with ever the more specifics concerning those. Perhaps, then anyone so inclined, will obtain other books that would help them in their studies for this, where they should desire much more for that. There are also the entire "Rules" for each of the '4' GAMES included, with the 'components' of those too, as seperate portions for them all.

For each "subject" upon the GAMES, then a general informational 'synopsis' is given that assists the reader in gaining some knowledge of the events with the "personalities" involved, in which that had driven the 'adversaries' upon their course of actions. These allow for some "mind set" to take place, in which to get someone into the 'spirit' of the gamings they're about to embark upon. There are ample photos provided within, that depict the various manners in which "Wargaming" had taken on its 'form' over the centuries. From the humble beginnings of "toy soldiers" used in an ancient "Indian" '4'-sided game called "Chaturanga", along with "GO" and even "Chess". There are some "works of Art" attributed with their "War themes" inspiring the 'artist' for creating that. While actual 'scenes' depicted for some of the "Battles" covered, were made available for viewing upon those. The "battlements" for the likes of the 'Fortress' at "Carcassone", along with some others, are shown to display these in their differing dispostions for the period of warfare that they depict. They have provided even some "weaponry" of the 'Combatants', or "Orders of Battle" in some cases. Then the likes of "Siege Warfare", as well as 'tactics', which were utilized have been discussed-although not at 'great lengths'. This has been provided here, in which to give a general idea upon those, while not bogging it all down with too much of the details. Plenty of "maps" also put these into their "World" perspective, for those who happen to like having them as references regarding their topics.
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M. Kirschenbaum
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GROGnads wrote:
...was an attempt by the "Royal Military Academy" at 'Sandhurst' in "England", and its then current members of the "Sandhurst Wargamer Club", to bring various 'gaming' techniques to the forefront.


In fact Paddy Griffith, in his introduction, is quite clear on the point that the games should be regarded as mere extracurricular playthings, the products of a handful of students and faculty and in no sense part of the academy's formal mission or curriculum.

I agree that there are some interesting ideas here. The Napoleonics contribution, for example, dresses up the standard Napoleon at Waterloo system with a "pinning" mechanic, which gives units a different set of combat values once they are engaged (locked) with one another. And yes, the WW II role playing is quite original.
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