Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 Hide
8 Posts

Genoa» Forums » Rules

Subject: rule clarifications that help speed up negotiations rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Togu Oppusunggu
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
My gaming group found that a few clarifications of the regular game rules help speed up the negotiation process. One is that consolidated deals (handshakes) can only be made for the space that the disk is already on or for a space that the tower player is about to move to. Other non-adjacent offers can be voiced, but they can be offered only as general considerations rather than as deals to be consolidated. Sticking to these rules helps reduce a lot of unneeded dialogue.

Another helpful clarification is that a deal to move to a space is at the same time a deal to take the action in that space. The only exception to this rule is street spaces (where no actions are taken but deals can be made to move to these spaces).

And lastly, a helpful hint. In general, you want to consolidate bargains and get your best deal before you move to a space. You can do so because you can threaten to move somewhere else or threaten to end your turn. Once you move to a space, you're forced to accept an offer from someone, no matter how low the offer is, if it's the only offer. It's fine to move to space without a bargain, if you're pretty certain that your opponents will bid against each other for that space's action, or if you have the option to take the action yourself. Of course, you may often need to go over certain buildings in order to reach a building that you desire - and so your opponents can bluff disinterest, to try to get you to go over buildings without a consolidated bargain.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J C Lawrence
United States
Campbell
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
Conversely, rather than selling the tower motions step by step, selling one step, doing that action, then selling the next step, we negotiate and sell the entire path of the tower from start to finish all at once, including potentially the use of a StartAnywhere card and thus where the tower will start. The resultant negotiations are much more interesting and dynamic, and perhaps surprisingly, are faster as well.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben .
United Kingdom
Unspecified
Surrey
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
toguopp wrote:
My gaming group found that a few clarifications of the regular game rules help speed up the negotiation process. One is that consolidated deals (handshakes) can only be made for the space that the disk is already on or for a space that the tower player is about to move to. Other non-adjacent offers can be voiced, but they can be offered only as general considerations rather than as deals to be consolidated. Sticking to these rules helps reduce a lot of unneeded dialogue.

Another helpful clarification is that a deal to move to space is at the same time a deal to take the action in that space. The only exception to this rule is street spaces (where no actions are taken but deals can be made to move to these spaces).


Erm - isn't this the rules exactly as written in the rulebook?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Togu Oppusunggu
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
Ben, the clarifications are more like "easily overlooked rules" that might be helpful for those new to the game to know. In the three times I've played it with three diffferent sets of people, these rules weren't followed to the tee, so negotiations were open-ended and longer as a result. So that's why, J.C., I'm actually surprised that the process your group uses actually shortens the negotiation time.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Richard Andrews
Germany
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Clear and concise overview. Nice one, and I'm sure it will help newbies get a handle on the negotiating aspect of this game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J C Lawrence
United States
Campbell
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
toguopp wrote:
So that's why, J.C., I'm actually surprised that the process your group uses actually shortens the negotiation time.


One thing to realise about selling the whole route is that it encourages information leakage. Everybody gets to find out considerably more about what is important to the other players than they would get by single stepping. Depending on you group and how much they pay attention to these sorts of things, this can be a big difference.

As to why the negotiations are faster? Simple really: people get to argue for what they want, other people have better understanding of what is actually wanted, and a big fat hunk of mystery is removed from the game. A typical negotiation can be done in a few minutes with breathing room left over.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Shaffer
United States
San Francisco
CA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
clearclaw wrote:
One thing to realise about selling the whole route is that it encourages information leakage. Everybody gets to find out considerably more about what is important to the other players than they would get by single stepping. Depending on you group and how much they pay attention to these sorts of things, this can be a big difference.


This is a huge negative, imho. I love trying to influence the direction of the tower subtly without giving away that I want a building two steps east of the current location.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Galloway
Canada
Lansdowne
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
TheCat wrote:

This is a huge negative, imho. I love trying to influence the direction of the tower subtly without giving away that I want a building two steps east of the current location.



Exactly. Especially if (and this happened in my last game) I have two messages to deliver, and sneakiness will let them both happen on someone else's turn.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.