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Subject: An easy painting technique rss

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Bruno Pigeon
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Hello! I've read a lot about the techniques used by members here on the geek to paint their miniatures. I would like to share the method I use which is a bit different.

Techniques used here usually involve basing, washing then drybrushing, or complex techniques like blending. Or simple things like dipping. I've tried all those techniques, except for dipping, and found that they were hard to use and didn't give me great results. Washing was especially horrible for me. And Drybrushing tend to be really difficult to control.

The technique I use is the same as Kevin Dallimore explains in his book: Foundry Miniatures Painting and Modelling Guide. It is a simple technique of layering where you create shade by covering a smaller area with a brighter paint for each layer.

First, you'll need some material:
Brushes: I use synthetic brushes. The tip of the brush is really important. It's what allows you to do small details. But don't make the mistake of painting with a really small brush. It will take you much more time to paint the same surface with it and the result are usually less good. So your main brush should be around size 1. Get some smaller brushes for finer details and awkward places to paint. And buy some really cheap brushes for mixing paint, drybrushing, varnish and the like.

Wet Palette: I use a wet palette and it is really great. I used to paint from the pot but that is not a good idea. The wet palette will allow you to dilute your paint to the right consistency quite easily. And it's great to mix your paint. When you paint you should always dilute your paint to a consitency similar to milk.

Paint: I once used Citadels paint but wasn't satisfied with it. I switched to P3 and they are much easier to use. And they cover better.

Gesso: Miracle stuff to prime your models. It's a black stuff that is used to prime canvas for acrylic painting. The most amazing property of Gesso is that it will shrink when it dries. So you can apply generously on the model and not worry too much about loosing details. Drawback is that it is black, so if you plan on painting in mostly bright colours. Like red, yellow, flesh, white... use something else. When I use pale colors, my primer of choice is Reaper White Primer.

Learn to mix your colours: When I began painting, I assumed that to get lighter colours, you had to add white, and if you wanted darker colours, you had to add black. That doesn't always give good results. Except for gray. There are better ways to do it. If you want to darken red, add a tiny bit of green or blue. For Yellow, use orange or brown, etc.


You can see an example of my finished ettin model:
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/image/1670477/descent-journeys-...

0- Remove mold line from the model with a hobby knife, then wash it in water and soap. Dry it then stick your miniature on a old paint pot with blue putty.

1- Prime with Gesso (or white primer) and let it dry (Maybe 30 minutes)


2a- Select your colors. For each color you will need 3 different shades. For example, if I want to paint flesh, I will need the following colors: P3 Khardic Flesh, P3 Midlund Flesh and another lighter shade that I will mix myself. Using a little bit of white.

2b- Base Coating: Using the darkest shade of each color you will use for your model, do a base coat. So for example every bit of flesh will be covered with P3 Khardic Flesh. You will probably need to do 3 layers over the black primer for Khardic Flesh.

For my flesh moulder, I painted the flesh with P3 Khardic flesh. 3 layers were necessary to cover the black primer. The hair was done with P3 Battlefield Brown, only 1 layer was necessary. The eyes were painted with P3 Morrow White and P3 Thamar Black. Only 1 layer. The clothing was painted using Citadel Red Gore. Three layers were necessary. For the magic thingy, I mixed some P3 Carnal Pink with a tiny drop of P3 Beaten Purple. Note that for the magic flames, I will reverse the shading pattern. With the brightest colors in the recesses, and the darkest on the raised parts.


3- Shading: Once your model is completely base coated, you will add some shading. Selecting the middle color. Now cover almost all of the previous color with this lighter shade. Keeping only the darkest colour in some places where you want shade

In this case, P3 Midlund Flesh mixed with P3 Khardic Flesh for the flesh. Citadel Red Gore mixed with P3 Khador Red Base for the clothes P3 Carnal Pink mixed with P3 Beaten Purple for the magic flame. And P3 Bloodstone for the hairs. Note: For fur and hairs, I usually do some drybrushing. It gives better result than trying to paint every details. Also used it on the Zombies clothing.



4- Highlighting: Using the brightest color, you now do the final highlighting, by painting the raised parts of the model.

Flesh is highlighted with P3 Midlund Flesh mixed with P3 Menoth White Highlight. Hairs are highlighted with P3 Rucksack Tan. Clothing with P3 Khador Red Base mixed with P3 Cygnus Yellow. Magic flames with a darker shade of P3 Carnal Pink and P3 Beaten Purple.



5- Final details: I now paint the small details, really carefully, so I do not mess the paint job I just did.

I put some P3 Cygnus Yellow on the edge of the clothes. Some P3 Menoth White Higlight for the nails and a bit a P3 Beaten Purple for the magic flame.


6- Finish: Use a matte finish to protect your miniature. P3 paint is also quite hard once dry, so there's not much to worry about.

Hope it will be helpful for some of you.
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Rafal Areinu
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Re: A different painting technique
I don't know... Shading trough using of multiple layers is the basic. And doesn't rule out using things like washing or drybrushing. For example I always drybrush fur or other hairy things, because those just look good like that...

super_bruno wrote:

Learn to mix your colours: When I began painting, I assumed that to get lighter colours, you had to add white, and if you wanted darker colours, you had to add black. That doesn't always give good results. Except for gray. There are better ways to do it. If you want to darken red, add a tiny bit of green or blue. For Yellow, use orange or brown, etc.

This is very good paragraph. Fortunately if you don't know how to mix a color there is google. Especially useful when you want to mix for color you don't have instead of just darker/lighter. Searches for "how to mix purple/dark red/grassy green/brown skin/whatever" bring really nice results
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Bruno Pigeon
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Re: A different painting technique
Most places i looked for painting technique was basing the miniature with the middle color then creating shade by using a darker wash and highlights with drybrushing. But i always found a wash difficult to control and getting mixed results. Sometimes its amazing and other times it looks muddy.

Painting three layers from darkest to lightest gives you much better control on where you will have shade and highlights. At least it works much better for me. My results got much better using this technique.

I guess a lot of people learn to paint with the Games workshop style and thats why your hear a lot about washing, drybrushing and blending. Kevin Dallimore technique is less well known but also gives great results.

Sure, every technique has its use, but some are easier to do than others. And yes drybrushing is great for fur and hair. But not so great on flesh and clothes.
 
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Bruno Pigeon
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Re: A different painting technique
Maybe I'll do a step by step guide to show how I work.
 
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Rafal Areinu
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Re: A different painting technique
I read about 10 different guides before I first tried paining. All of them said to start with darkest color, then move to lighter ones, so I am a little baffled about what's different in yours.

Usually washing/drybrushing were described in later chapters and regarded as advanced techniques to be used for additional effects. Those guides detailed what you can accomplish by different uses of those methods. I'm talking about some free guides I found on some websites. I read so many because most of them were either unfinished or incomplete...

Every new guide is good thing - the easier the information is to get the easier it's for people to start paining So I urge you to create that guide. Plus I like to check out how other people paint.
 
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Bruno Pigeon
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Re: A different painting technique
Areinu wrote:
I read about 10 different guides before I first tried paining. All of them said to start with darkest color, then move to lighter ones, so I am a little baffled about what's different in yours.

Usually washing/drybrushing were described in later chapters and regarded as advanced techniques to be used for additional effects. Those guides detailed what you can accomplish by different uses of those methods. I'm talking about some free guides I found on some websites. I read so many because most of them were either unfinished or incomplete...

Every new guide is good thing - the easier the information is to get the easier it's for people to start paining So I urge you to create that guide. Plus I like to check out how other people paint.


Well, as I have said before, the majority of the guides I have encountered involved painting a basecoat from the middle color and then creationg shade by washing in a darker color, then highlighting with drybrushing.

If that is not what you encountered then of course the way I paint is not different for you. But maybe it is for someone else.

If I'm the only one who didn't know how to paint this way before buying the painting guide, then I must have been pretty unlucky in my research.
 
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Bruno Pigeon
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Added some pictures to do a step by step guide for flesh moulder.
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Robert
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Adding pictures is alwàys good if you give paint advice.

I haven't tried my hand at painting any of my descent minis, but I think a large part of why you are having less than stellar results with dry brushing and washing is because the details tend to be quite soft. The harder the plastic, and the sharper the details, the easier both washing and drybrushing is, and the better the end results look.

Now, having said that, I do believe your paint results will improve a lot from both techniques, but at this point especially drybrushing.

There seem to be two techniques that are different from one another that are both called drybrushing. One uses a flat brush and you tightly control where paint goes. I call this highlighting, it's hard, and not what I'm talking about.
The other one uses any dense brush (I really like the games workshop drybrushes). Dip tip in paint (just the tip of the brush! Keep it dry!) wipe one side of brush on paper towel until almost no paint comes off (you know you're doing it right when you start drybrushing the texture of the paper towel) and then apply brush to model USING THE SAME WIPED OFF SIDE OF THE BRUSH. Keep stroking until you see the effect. Use either a lighter color of what you are painting (orange on red), or, for a less subtle effect, just a lighter color (light grey-blue on blue).

Check out my gallery for some pictures of drybrushing and washing, and feel free to ask questions.
 
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Bruno Pigeon
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I do use drybrushing on highly textured surfaces. I just do not like how it looks on surfaces without a lot of details. I used to do a wash with inks 20 years ago, and it worked fine. I just prefer to do the shading by hand nowadays and like the results better.

Here are some samples of metal minis I have painted:
Please keep in mind that I'm not able to do them justice with a photo. They look much better in real. Also, the caveman on the left was done using blending techniques mostly. It is time consuming and not worth the effort for me. I prefer the one on the right.



 
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Charles Hasegawa
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super_bruno wrote:

First, you'll need some material:
Brushes: I use synthetic brushes. The tip of the brush is really important. It's what allows you to do small details. But don't make the mistake of painting with a really small brush. It will take you much more time to paint the same surface with it and the result are usually less good. So your main brush should be around size 1. Get some smaller brushes for finer details and awkward places to paint. And buy some really cheap brushes for mixing paint, drybrushing, varnish and the like.

Gesso: Miracle stuff to prime your models. It's a black stuff that is used to prime canvas for acrylic painting. The most amazing property of Gesso is that it will shrink when it dries. So you can apply generously on the model and not worry too much about loosing details. Drawback is that it is black, so if you plan on painting in mostly bright colours. Like red, yellow, flesh, white... use something else. When I use pale colors, my primer of choice is Reaper White Primer.


I've been buy cheap synthetic brushes from Hobby Lobby - usually a pack of various sized detail brushes (5-7 brushes) runs me less than $2. I haven't found them to fall apart or split/splay any faster than a $6 brush, and I don't feel bad when they do. I know a lot of painters swear on expensive sable brushes, but the cheap ones seem to be serving me well.

I got a pot of white Gesso at Walmart. You should be able to find white Gesso quite easily. I use an airbrush and found I needed to use a larger needle (.5) or it clogged on me, but it worked. I'm not convinced the results were any better than just using Krylon flat white and black colors, but the pot was about $8 (a can of Krylon is about $4 for primer), so it may be cheaper in the long run and I can just mix shades if I want to base in gray (or pre-shade a model).

I have been using the newer Citadel washes and love them. There is a good variety of colors and I've found the control on them to be great and they really speed up the time to finish a model. I also admit that I'm not a great shader and find that washes have helped make my results look 100% better than before.

I have tried the dip method, but found it messy and didn't love the results (but admit that if you want a fast and easy paint job, this is ok). The main issue I had here is that the whole model is "washed/dipped" in one color at the end. With the wash/shades from Citadel, you hit them after the base color and can match the shades to various areas (again, I've found it terribly easy to control where the wash was going on small models). Once the wash is on, I feel like I'm 80% done and just highlight or do a small amount of drybrushing and be done.

There are a bazillion methods, so whatever works! Good write up!
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Bruno Pigeon
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Tatsu wrote:
[q="super_bruno"]
I've been buy cheap synthetic brushes from Hobby Lobby - usually a pack of various sized detail brushes (5-7 brushes) runs me less than $2. I haven't found them to fall apart or split/splay any faster than a $6 brush, and I don't feel bad when they do. I know a lot of painters swear on expensive sable brushes, but the cheap ones seem to be serving me well.

I got a pot of white Gesso at Walmart. You should be able to find white Gesso quite easily. I use an airbrush and found I needed to use a larger needle (.5) or it clogged on me, but it worked. I'm not convinced the results were any better than just using Krylon flat white and black colors, but the pot was about $8 (a can of Krylon is about $4 for primer), so it may be cheaper in the long run and I can just mix shades if I want to base in gray (or pre-shade a model).

I have been using the newer Citadel washes and love them. There is a good variety of colors and I've found the control on them to be great and they really speed up the time to finish a model. I also admit that I'm not a great shader and find that washes have helped make my results look 100% better than before.

I have tried the dip method, but found it messy and didn't love the results (but admit that if you want a fast and easy paint job, this is ok). The main issue I had here is that the whole model is "washed/dipped" in one color at the end. With the wash/shades from Citadel, you hit them after the base color and can match the shades to various areas (again, I've found it terribly easy to control where the wash was going on small models). Once the wash is on, I feel like I'm 80% done and just highlight or do a small amount of drybrushing and be done.

There are a bazillion methods, so whatever works! Good write up!


I've tried Sable brush once, they are still in my kit, never to be used again. It was not the miracle brush that makes you the best painter ever that they keep telling you about. I didn't like it at all. Prefer synthetic brushes.

They have white Gesso? Oooooh, I need to get some. Myself I paint it on. Dont't have a airbrush.

Yes lots of methods exist. This one worked best for me and thought I could share it.

Maybe I should try the new washes. It's just that I don't like it when I've painted my model with a great looking color, really pleasent for the eye. Then put a wash over it, which changes it's look.

Thanks for your comments!
 
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super_bruno wrote:
[q="Tatsu"][q="super_bruno"]
They have white Gesso? Oooooh, I need to get some. Myself I paint it on. Dont't have a airbrush.



Hi Bruno,
I have been using black gesso for a while and I am 100% satisfied, however white gesso doesn't seem to work as well, and I have tried the Liquitex and Golden brands too. It doesn't seem to shrink as well as black Gesso.

Regarding your original post, I just ordered a book from Kevin Dallimore
and I am too in the situation where washes ruin my paint job. I also think that the layering technique forces you to think ahead and plan the light/shadow area of the miniature. In small scale miniature painting (6mm, 10mm) washes seem inevitable as they create depth and unify all the units, but for larger 28mm minis I am tempted to try it without washes.
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Bruno Pigeon
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I do use a wash sometimes, when there is small details like the shield of Syndrael, which helps make the engravings more visible. But mostly I prefer to paint the colors I want.

Hope you will achieve satisfying results without using washes.
 
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About Kolinski sable brushes: the sable alone doesn't make a good brush. I have tried multiple brands, some were as good or worst as normal descent hobby brushes, but I have rosemary & co brushes straight from the uk, and they are outstanding! I can't tell you how much of a difference it makes for me. And the rosemary ones are not even that expensive.
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