John Griffey
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In the optional rules, Generals get a Prestige point (1P) for each Independent Army they eliminate.

VARIANT:
Award 2 P each
--for eliminating an Independent Army.
--for taking control of an Independent Major City.
--for taking control of Cappadocia.
--for taking control of Greece.

Award 1 P each
--for taking control of an Independent Stronghold.
--for taking control of provinces other than Cappadocia and Greece, which were entirely Independent controlled at the start of the game.

On Game Turn 2, the player who controls Macedonia receives one Royal (not loyal) Macedonian. The player who has the most Legitimacy Points also receives one Royal (not Loyal) Macedonian. In the remaining turns, Loyal Macedonians are received for control of Macedonia and having the most LP, as in the original rules.

Each extra 1 P is represented by a penny placed on the Strategos's card. If more than one Strategos is in the Stronghold, City, or province at the instant it is controlled. the Prestige point goes to the player's senior Strategos.

Each 5 P a player has accumulated adds 1 LP to his LP score for purposes of calculating a Legitimacy Point Victory or a Regency Victory. For example, 9 P would translate as 1 LP, but 10 P would translate as 2 LP.


Early in the struggle, the historical Diadochi fought hard to crush rebels and enemies of Macedonia. Perdiccas went after the Cappadocians, with their large pro-Persian forces, even before going after Antigonus. Early too was the Lamian War, where Antipater, Craterus, and Leonnatus fought together to crush the Greeks. Leonnatus died fighting the Greeks. In the early game, beating up the Independent Army in Cappadocia is easy, but is a minor tactic at best, not part of a possible wider strategy. Nor is there any incentive for multiplayer operations to crush the Greeks, as seems to have happened historically.

In the games I've played, no one tries to conquer Cappadocia, and no one goes after the Greeks or other Independent Strongholds and Major Cities early on, because they need to scoop the easier pickings first, then last comes the clash of armies. With more Prestige available, players would have more of a realistic incentive to go after these Independent rebels and enemies, to increase Prestige, to protect or to neutralize control of the Royal Macedonians. Antipater, Craterus, and Perdiccas, with their unreliable Royal Macedonians, would have more incentive to do as they historically did in the early part of the wars. Their opponents would also invest more in increasing their early Prestige.
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Daniel Blumentritt
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Quote:
In the games I've played, no one tries to conquer Cappadocia, and no one goes after the Greeks or other Independent Strongholds and Major Cities early on
I think part of the reason is nobody starts with a very large quantity of troops.
 
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John Griffey
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That is right. Although Perdiccas could certainly whip the Cappadocian Persians quickly, he needs best to whip them without losing a CU, which means he needs to build up some forces first.

There is the problem of losing CUs in clashes with Independent forces. Each CU one loses fighting a green Independent increases the relative strength of one's rivals.

Another issue is that there are only a few Royal Macedonians, and their number does not increase; their number only decreases over time. The only purpose of Prestige is to keep control of Royal Macedonians.

If the Macedonian Reinforcements for most Legitimacy and for control of Macedonia were Royal rather than Loyal, there would be more incentive to gain Prestige.

I'll look at the counter mix to see how many of these Royal Macedonians there are.
 
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