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Subject: Playing tips rss

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Michael Rumaley
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Just some things that I wish I had thought of when I first started playing this game.

365

Use a cribbage board for a clock. This should be useful for any of these old sports simulations where the player needs to mark the passage of time by making a specified number of tick marks per period using pencil and paper. For hockey, I use a three-track cribbage board, where the center (green) track is for game time, and the left and right tracks represent penalties for each team.

365

Dice tower. Dice tray. Maybe an extra set of dice. There are about a thousand die rolls in a typical game. Dump and chase makes for boring hockey.

365

Use a Sorry-style pawn for a puck. The little wooden cylinder is very thematic, and rolls even farther than dice when it gets a hankering to visit the floor.

365

Stack the player cards for each position for each team, and use an elevated platform like a large book, or a flat block of wood and don‘t skimp on the carnauba. It makes frequent line changes easier, without which it just doesn’t feel like hockey.

365

Ignore the assist-retaliation chart that came with some editions of the game using those goofy d6-2d6 ranges, and just keep a pair of d10s handy.

365

For those seasons where the goalie cards have a jumble of results with lots of single digits, attach this chart near the Goalie Table on the game charts.

0 1 2 3 4 Pass
C RW LW RD LD
5 6 7 8 9 Rebound


365

Who plays today? Like for the 1979-80 Colorado Rockies with cards for 40 skaters, 17 (that number varies by season) of whom ought to dress for any given game. Whenever I’m too lazy to do much research, I turn to dice. Shuffle the skater cards gently. For each skater, roll 2d10 until I get a number between 1 and the number of games the team played that season, in this case 80. If the dice roll is between 1 and the number of games that player played, put his card on the IN pile, otherwise put it on the OUT pile. Go through the stack of players once. If there are more than 17 in the IN pile re-roll for each player on the IN pile starting from one end of the stack (just be consistent) until the IN pile reaches 17. If there are fewer than 17 on the IN pile, re-roll for each player on the OUT pile until there are 17 on the IN pile. If I end up with fewer than 50 total shifts of defensemen, I start the whole thing over. This method might occasionally result in players who were traded for each other playing together, or even one player playing for both teams against himself. I don’t care; I’m still too lazy to do a lot of research. Feel free to tweak this system to accommodate information regarding traded players.

365

Too lazy to count shifts played during the game? Once you’ve selected today’s lineup, just eyeball the suggested playing time on each player’s card at the beginning of the game, and decide who should play one, two, or three periods, rotating 2 or 3 defensive pairs and 3 or 4 front lines as needed in each period. It’s only a simulation. The score sheets that came with my version of the game have boxes to tally each player’s shots on goal for each period; a diagonal line through these can mark who should sit out, still allowing usage in case of penalties or injuries.

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Steve Carey
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PhygLeGuy wrote:
Too lazy to count shifts played during the game?


Another simple way is to flip a line over after its shift. Refresh (flip back to front) lines as the period progresses and other lines flip.

Allow double-shifting (shift, then rest, then shift again) near the end of the game, depending on the circumstances.

We play with the honor system and have never had a problem in hundreds of games (e.g., the 4th line gets its usual ice time).
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Michael Rumaley
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Steve Carey wrote:
Another simple way is to flip a line over after its shift.


Thanks. I'm so persnickety that I like to know that I have made some effort to get the 5-shift players more time than the 3-shift players. I'm not sure how flipping lines gets me there, but with a game like this, everyone gets to play it their own way.
 
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Steve Carey
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Each line usually plays 5 time segments (2 minutes) at time, so that's 10 shifts per team per period. Each player manages their own lines depending on how the game is going, without any obvious unrealistic abuses.

For example with Forwards, in the 1st period my top two lines may play 3 shifts each and my bottom two lines 2 shifts each.

However, if I'm down two goals in the 3rd period, my first line may get 4 shifts, my second line 3 shifts, my third line 2 shifts, and my 4th line just 1 shift.

If I'm up 2 goals in the final frame, then I tend to play my bottom two lines more for face-off wins, checking and passage of time (i.e., energy).

Good point re: the game being very flexible allowing for each 'coach' to implement their own style.

 
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