Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
12 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: Rumis or Pueblo? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Ed
United States
Oakland
California
flag msg tools
badge
Wankel engine
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Boy, these two games sure look and sound similar. Which one is better?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I find them about the same goodness. Pueblo is a bit more gemery, but you have to stand up and walk around the table a lot. Currently, I'm enjoying Rumis more, but that's probably just because it's newer.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Kouba
United States
Franklin
OH
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
in rumis there is an elimination element and the blocks are different shapes. there is also a variety of boards

in pueblo, all shapes are the same and although there are two boards, they are the same shape with some areas that you can't build upon on the one side

I concur that pueblo is more dense but I like to have both in my collection
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stephen Tavener
United Kingdom
London
England
flag msg tools
designer
The overtext below is true.
badge
The overtext above is false.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rumis gets my vote; played both, but Pueblo didn't really hold my interest for long.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sue Hemberger

Washington
Dist of Columbia
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
And if you do buy Rumis, don't forget to print out the new templates posted by Warlord Zen and Schirf!

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/fileinfo.php?fileid=15231
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todd
United States
Cleveland
Tennessee
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Having played both I would recomend Rumis for sure.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dane Peacock
United States
Stansbury Park
Utah
flag msg tools
badge
That tickles
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rumis by a mile.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Clint DeSena
United States
Plainville
Connecticut
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Pueblo is definitely more of a gamer's game, but Rumis is quicker, contains blocks of all different shapes, and can be even more cutthroat. Get Rumis.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
P B
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Of the two, which is considered heavier and more strategic?

What makes these games different?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon
United States
Edmond
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
admin
Convention Committee
badge
BGG.CON! BGG.CON SPRING! BGG@SEA!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Pueblo is a very..."negative" game. The psychology of the game is all about what you can do to hurt yourself the least. And I honestly can't remember ever seeing an 'A-ha! Great play!" moment in Pueblo. When the game is over, I've never seen anyone ask to immediately play again, or even discuss the game. It's hard to explain...

Rumis, in spite of the potential player elimination, seems to provide a more "enjoyable" game (at least for the people I've gamed with). And there is a bit of clever gameplay, in choosing the right piece to play in the right location, letting you expand in the future AND block someone else off. Most times that I've brought Rumis to the table, we've played through all the boards in one sitting.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Tracy
United States
San Francisco
CA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
First off, it's really tough to compare the two games. Yes, they look similar, but they play pretty differently. Yes, you stack and build, but that is about where the similarity ends. Having said, here is my take on the two games:

Rumis has pieces of different shapes, and you try to use all of them. It is more, um, Tetris-like. It plays quicker and is easier to explain. You must connect to your color in one way or another, and people can try and block you off. In the end, all that matters is how much you have exposed on top, and how many pieces you have left over. Rumis has a turntable board so lazy geeks don't have to stand up and risk spilling their Fresca.

Pueblo's pieces are all the same. Points are bad. You have your color pieces, and neutral ones and you are obligated to use both, and do what you can to not expose your color to Mr Builder guy that walks around the board. People protect themselves and then try and move Mr Builder guy so that he can give points to other players. Although the game plays longer is a little more difficult to describe than Rumis, it really is not reason to fault the game, since both games are quite different and I think use different parts of your brain.

Honestly, both games are good. Rumis has more buzz I think since it is a more recent release and is quicker to grasp. Pueblo is nothing to scoff at.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jorge Montero
United States
St Louis
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
I'll take Manhattan in a garbage bag. With Latin written on it that says "It's hard to give a shit these days"
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
AnakinOU wrote:
Pueblo is a very..."negative" game. The psychology of the game is all about what you can do to hurt yourself the least. And I honestly can't remember ever seeing an 'A-ha! Great play!" moment in Pueblo. When the game is over, I've never seen anyone ask to immediately play again, or even discuss the game. It's hard to explain...

Rumis, in spite of the potential player elimination, seems to provide a more "enjoyable" game (at least for the people I've gamed with). And there is a bit of clever gameplay, in choosing the right piece to play in the right location, letting you expand in the future AND block someone else off. Most times that I've brought Rumis to the table, we've played through all the boards in one sitting.



I think Rumis is the one with the negative feeling. In every turn, you have to ask... Is there any way I can kill someone else's chances of winning? The next step is to figure out if people are going to be able to kill you.

I've seen people asking to play again, mainly because they got beat so badly that they didn't find one playing fulfilling. Being out of contention after move 3 is not uncommon. After playing for a whole 3 minutes before you are out of contention, of course people want to try again, see if they can do better. Unfortunately, spacial skills are the key to Rumis, so the same people tend to win all the time. This leads to 'metagaming', just because you know X is a stronger player than most. Kingmaking situations are also very, very common.

Pueblo doesn't have 'aha' piece placements, because the game is not really based on 'seeing' the board: The game is all about setting up scoring opportunities by predicting your opponent's shaman movements and long term planning to minimize your piece's exposure at the end of the game: You won't see any strategic components like that in Rumis.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.