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Subject: Three rules questions for USAC Auto Racing rss

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Taylor S
United States
California
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I bought USAC when it originally came out. I just pulled my copy out again and would like to try an Indy 500 one more time.

However, there are a few rules that I'm still unclear about. I always thought AH did a generally good job of writing rules, but sometimes they are TOO simple (particularly with the sports games) and I would have doubts I was playing correctly (some samples of play would have helped greatly). Or, maybe it's just me:

1. "In track turns, all inside lane cars move before outside cars." Does this mean that even if a car is in the third space on the inside turn lane (meaning, three spaces from reaching a straightaway space), that car will still move before a car located on the first space of the second turn lane (meaning, only one space from the straightaway space)?

That's what the rule seems to state, but I still feel obligated to ask since it appears I've played this incorrectly for about 25 years.

2. The Optional Passing Through rule: This rule mentions this can be performed "on a straightaway," but does not clarify if just one, or both cars need to be on a straightaway. I've played that as long as the car being passed through is on a straightaway space (and there is a clear space to move into), passing through can be performed. Does that sound correct?

3. Yellow Caution: This one always caused me headaches. More specifically, when a yellow caution is called, how are the turns for the remaining drivers resolved? I've always assumed any drivers who've not yet rolled need to do so to complete their turn, and then the cars are lined up single file. But, does this mean that (for example), if the lead car crossed the finish line on the turn of the yellow caution, he gets credit for a completed lap, but if the No. 2 car does not reach the finish line that turn, he does not get credit for a completed lap? (Or should it be, instead, that cars still on the track when the yellow is called should be considered to have completed that lap?) Finally, I assume that cars in the pits when a yellow is called are not credited with a completed lap?

Anyway, I admit I'm not the most knowledgeable about motor sports, and that may be a source of my confusion. But if anyone who plays (or has played) this game has the time to offer their opinion on the above, I would greatly appreciate it.
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Jonathan Evans
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ftaylor63 wrote:
I bought USAC when it originally came out. I just pulled my copy out again and would like to try an Indy 500 one more time.

However, there are a few rules that I'm still unclear about. [snipped]

1. "In track turns, all inside lane cars move before outside cars." Does this mean that even if a car is in the third space on the inside turn lane (meaning, three spaces from reaching a straightaway space), that car will still move before a car located on the first space of the second turn lane (meaning, only one space from the straightaway space)?

That's what the rule seems to state, but I still feel obligated to ask since it appears I've played this incorrectly for about 25 years.


Yes, move all cars in the inside turn lane first, then proceed to cars in the middle lane, etc. This really makes an important strategic difference, particularly as it makes turning in the top lane doubly disadvantageous (1-more spaces to traverse, 2-later turn order).

ftaylor63 wrote:

2. The Optional Passing Through rule: This rule mentions this can be performed "on a straightaway," but does not clarify if just one, or both cars need to be on a straightaway. I've played that as long as the car being passed through is on a straightaway space (and there is a clear space to move into), passing through can be performed. Does that sound correct?


Yes, I think that's right. Since passing through does not involve a change of lanes, it wouldn't violate the "no lane change" rule for turn lanes.

I'll try to get back to you on your third question, shortly. Hope this helps!



 
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Taylor S
United States
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Jon,

A belated thanks for your answers!

Regards

FTS

 
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Steven Packard
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jacojre wrote:
ftaylor63 wrote:
I bought USAC when it originally came out. I just pulled my copy out again and would like to try an Indy 500 one more time.

However, there are a few rules that I'm still unclear about. [snipped]

1. "In track turns, all inside lane cars move before outside cars." Does this mean that even if a car is in the third space on the inside turn lane (meaning, three spaces from reaching a straightaway space), that car will still move before a car located on the first space of the second turn lane (meaning, only one space from the straightaway space)?

That's what the rule seems to state, but I still feel obligated to ask since it appears I've played this incorrectly for about 25 years.


Yes, move all cars in the inside turn lane first, then proceed to cars in the middle lane, etc. This really makes an important strategic difference, particularly as it makes turning in the top lane doubly disadvantageous (1-more spaces to traverse, 2-later turn order).


Surely that can't be right, can it? I can't make that make sense to me.

Just to be sure that I understand what you're saying, let's number each space in each row, starting from the Start/Finish line and going around the track, and let's assign a letter to each "column" starting with the inside lane. So then you'd have the first space on the inside as A1, and the space to the right of that is B1, while the space in front of the original space is A2, etc.

In the long straights you have columns ranging from A to E, and the rows range from 1 to 60 or so in the first two columns (A and B), and higher in the longer route columns. (I don't have the board in front of me, but I think I'm being clear.)

With this setup, are you guys saying that you think that all of the cars in column A move, then all of the cars in B move, then C, D, and E? I can see where a strict interpretation of the rules would lead to that conclusion, but that seems like it would be one big mess.

I've always played it such that, for example, you'd move the car in A8 first, then the car in B8, then the car in D8, then the car in A6, then the car in E5, then the car in A3.

(That's assuming that all these cars are on the same lap, and these are the only cars on the track, to keep the example simple.)

In other words, I think that on any given row, the inside car goes first, but as the rules say elsewhere, "whoever is first, goes first". In other words, if a car is ahead of another car, it moves before the 2nd one.

I'd love to hear what others have to say about this because like the original poster said, I've been playing this very wrong for a couple of decades if you think that in my example the cars should move:

A8
A6
A3
B8
D8
E5

 
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Steven Packard
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OK, I see where I've made a big mistake.

You guys (and the rules) are saying that this rule about all cars in the inside lanes move before all cars in the outer lanes only applies in the turns, i.e., corners.

I thought you were saying that this rule applies for the whole track. So disregard my above example.

And I always read that part of the rules as saying that "during a turn" (i.e., during a round of flipping through the stack of driver cards), the inner car goes before the outer car [in a given row].

OK, this makes sense. I now understand what you're saying. I'm glad you pointed out my error, even when I didn't realize that it was in question. I'll have to make a note in the instructions to make sure that I remember this.

Thanks.
 
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Skip Franklin
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ftaylor63 wrote:


3. Yellow Caution: This one always caused me headaches. More specifically, when a yellow caution is called, how are the turns for the remaining drivers resolved? I've always assumed any drivers who've not yet rolled need to do so to complete their turn, and then the cars are lined up single file. But, does this mean that (for example), if the lead car crossed the finish line on the turn of the yellow caution, he gets credit for a completed lap, but if the No. 2 car does not reach the finish line that turn, he does not get credit for a completed lap? (Or should it be, instead, that cars still on the track when the yellow is called should be considered to have completed that lap?) Finally, I assume that cars in the pits when a yellow is called are not credited with a completed lap?



Question 3 was never answered. I had the same question but...I will try to use logic.

First of all the rulebook is deficient in answering this question but, the Trouble Chart may hold the key. Look at Trouble #1. When a driver bounces off the retaining wall it talks about the next five drivers having to make rolls to see if they get tangled up in this mishap. To me that would mean that you continue through the stack of cards before stopping the race, determine who enters the pits and rolling for skipped laps.

Note: I was unable to determine the how pit stops happened under the yellow flag and came up with this portion of the rules. Have each driver deteremine if they will enter the pits then roll for skipped laps.
 
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curt young
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rule 1 interpretation:
as a veteran user of AH's speed circuit [formerly 3M's], where there is some advantage to taking the outer lane in a curve [higher speed is allowed], a similar question often arises. i find a rule giving TWO advantages to a car on the inner lane to be more than a bit lopsided, even though the literal reading of the rules SEEMS to be doing that. re-reading the rules, there is NO mention of the middle lane, so a lawyer or a math major would say there is room for interpretation. there r two more reasonable ways to clarify the pecking order in curves [keep the word "turn" for turns of play]:
a. aaron austin rule: the car with the least number of spaces left to escape the corner gets first crack at moving as he is in the lead of anyone in the same corner. if two cars have the same 'distance' to go to escape the corner, THEN, and only then, does the innermost have precedence.
b. a car in the outer lane 6 spaces into the curve [out of 7 spaces] would be a bit ahead of a car in the middle lane 3 spaces into the curve and a car in the inner lane 2 spaces into the curve; but a car only 5 spaces into the curve in the outer lane would be a bit behind a car in the middle lane 3 spaces into the curve [5/7=.714 < 3/4=.750]; etc. the locations of the leading edge of the spaces in each lane clearly tell which car would be leading in a curve.
to demonstrate the absurdity of the strict constructionist reading of the game rule, consider car A to be in the inside lane, 1 space into the curve, and car B to be in the outside lane, 7 spaces into the curve.
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