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Subject: Best Rulebook rss

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Ron Hayes
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What rulebook would be the "gold standard"?

As a hopeful new designer which books should I look to model my rulebook after?
 
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Jim Cote
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http://www.gmtgames.com/living_rules/CC_Rulebook_v1.1.pdf
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John "Omega" Williams
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There isnt.

What attracts one player will put off another.
Some people hate SPI's rules structure, others like it.

Base advice is to be clear and orderly. Find your own rythm and focus on making sure everything is clearly explained.

Start off with the basics, the things the players need to know and work down the list till you get to the end game rules and any optionals or variants.

There are lots of ways to go about it.

In mine I start off with movement. Then exploration, then combat, then special character powers, then items, etc till I get to the end game conditions and the optionals and variants.
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Ron Hayes
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You are of course right, there is no one rulebook to rule them all... but there are definitely rulebooks that people generally like more than others.

Which do you mean when you say SPI?
 
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Michael Carter
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The rule book for Mage Wars is commonly praised.
 
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Beau Bocephus Blasterfire
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rehj wrote:
What rulebook would be the "gold standard"?

As a hopeful new designer which books should I look to model my rulebook after?
I asked a similar question a while back and the most popular pick I got back then was Dominant Species. I never cared for Mage Wars Arena rulebook personally. I had a difficult time finding answers to questions that arose while playing.
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Craig Somerton
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I've always found the rules for some Queen games are nicely done, clean, concise with loads of diagrams and examples.

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/file/download/9m6wzbgao2/Thebes...

http://www.escape-queen-games.com/fileadmin/Templates/Escape...

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/file/download/7dd2tu9hhm/Kingdo...
 
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John "Omega" Williams
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rehj wrote:
You are of course right, there is no one rulebook to rule them all... but there are definitely rulebooks that people generally like more than others.

Which do you mean when you say SPI?
SPI produced many many wargames and some other popular space games. They were for a long time THE wargame company. They and Task Force Games had a very specifically structured rule book. Once you were used to the ordering they were very easy to refference. But some fond the rule layout convoluted.

Another problem with following someone elses layout is that it may clash with your style of writing and potentially cause you to miss rules or try to shoehorn rules into brackets they shouldn't be in.

Hence why I say write your rules your way and THEN see if it needs restructuring.

You need to focus on clarity. Not rule book structure first. Get things hammered down and then determine how you want to lay it all out. Often the nature of the game may determine the ordering.

Another example. In Red Shetland the ordering was as follows. Starting introduction to the world. Then character generation broken down into explaining the stats, then the point system and the species available, followed by bonuses and handicaps. Next was the professions followed and attendant skills and magic. Then came equipment and the combat system. Lastly was the leveling system and an explanation of the learn-through-use mechanic.

That is different from my maze game which went more or less thusly. Intro, Movement, Explore, Encounter, Powers, Options.
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Scott Nelson
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For eurogames, I've never had much trouble with an Alea rule book. Their structure has the major rules on the page with a quick review column on the same page.

But, now, the non-gold standard was early treefrog/warfrog games; those beasts were out of order and sometimes major rules were only in examples.
 
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Jonathan Schindler
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The best and clearest rulebook I've read is Belfortfrom Tasty Minstrel Games. Good text, good examples, and good graphic design really make it pop. The rulebook also serves to be entertaining as well as informative.
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Daniel Solis
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It's a small game, but I've always admired how Jaipur's rulebook split up the two actions into facing, color-coded pages so you could see them side-by-side, complete with clear diagrams.
 
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