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Wizard Kings

Introduction

You are one of the Wizard Kings locked in a desperate struggle to control the world. You command Orcs, Elves, or one of the other races. Choose your army, build your fortifications, ready your spells, and march to victory.

Wizard Kings can play in as little as one hour or be used as part of a miniatures campaign for months. Victory conditions vary with the many possible scenarios.


Wizard Kings (first edition)

First Edition Cover
(Columbia Games)
First Edition Cover
(Tilsit)
-

Released in 2000, the first edition of Wizard Kings was received with mixed reviews.

The (relatively) simple rules and use of blocks to introduce "fog of war" were well-received, as was the great variety of expansion maps and units available for the game. However, Wizard Kings also received criticsm. Shipping with only a basic head-to-head scenario (which failed to showcase the strength and diversity of the block combat system) was generally considered a mistake, and a series of rule revisions splintered the player base - often leading to discussions about which version of the rules (and indeed, which house rules) were best used to play the game.

An active fan base helped to provide additional scenarios, helping lessen one of the perceived flaws, but the balance of these scenarios often depended on using a particular set of rules.

Additional scenarios, can be found at:

Contents

The basic Wizard Kings boxed set included the following components:

  • 4 full-color geomorphic maps (#1-4)
  • 2 complete armies (Elves and Orcs)
  • 1 rulebook
  • 4 dice

Expansions

Initially, several individual Wizard Kings expansions were sold. Sets of maps and/or complete armies could be added in any order and immediately used during Wizard Kings games.

Expansion armies included a complete set of 28 blocks and labels with an army card summarizing specific unit strengths and abilities. The exception to this rule were the Chaos and Werebeast armies, which contained four blocks for each of the seven armies. The units were meant to be distributed between the existing armies to help provide balance and extra variety. However, there was no list prescribing which labels were intended for which blocks.

Expansion maps were all geomorphic and compatible with the four maps distributed as part of the original box set. Some maps used a slightly different configuration, with one corner being completely covered in land hexes. These were referred to as "continental maps".

The following expansions were released for the first edition:

Wizard Kings: Expansion Maps

  • Maps 5/6 (Barrenlands)
  • Maps 7/8 (Dragonia)
  • Maps 9/10 (Misty Islands)
  • Maps 11/12 (Azure Shore)

Wizard Kings: Expansion Armies

  • Elves - Eldryn
  • Orcs - Jurlak
  • Undead - Mortod
  • Dwarves - Khurdak
  • Amazons - Viksyn
  • Barbarians - Wildryn
  • Warboars - Ferkin
  • Chaos
  • Werebeasts


Wizard Kings (second edition)

Second Edition Cover
(Columbia Games)
-

For the second edition of Wizard Kings, many changes were made to both the rules and playing components. A brief (and incomplete) list of changes is included below:
  • Units are no longer sold as army packs. When you buy the base set, you get a usable selection of units from all 7 armies (in the original Wizard Kings, you got full Orcish and Elven armies). When you buy booster packs, you get 3 additional units for each army. A much larger number of units appears to be available: over 300 according to Columbia Games's press release. In the first edition, each Army had a Wizard, a Castle, a one-cost cheap unit, and 3 others in-between. In the second edition, it appears each army will have access to at the very least 10-15 different types of units, including Heroes, Clerics, and a couple different kinds of Wizards in addition to standard unit types.
  • Much new artwork has been created. Some units (Chaos units and Werebeasts in particular) retain their version 1 artwork, but many other units have had their art upgraded.
  • The Ferkin army has been dropped in favor of an all-new Feudal army.
  • Errata included, spells and unit values changed in many cases.
  • The rules have been updated, and while very similar to the most recent version for the first edition (revision 1.6), there have been a number of changes, including stacking limits and the mechanics of spending gold.
  • Four two-player scenarios are included in the box, providing several different types of gameplay, with more scenarios being released through the official Wizard Kings website (http://www.columbiagames.com/wizardkings ).

For a further summary of changes, see http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/158921.

Contents

The basic Wizard Kings 2.0 set includes the following components:

  • 4 Full-color Geomorphic Maps (#13-16)
  • 56 Blocks (8 units for each of the 7 available armies)
  • 1 Rulebook
  • 4 dice
  • 8 Spell cards
  • Gold counters

Expansions

Expansion sets are now sold on a random basis, containing 21 new units. Each army receives 2 new units, with the remaining 7 blocks being used for 4 Chaos units, 1 Werebeast, 1 Artifact, and 1 Treasure.

Columbia made a comment in the 2.0 press release that distribution of the new units would not be even. Since you need a lot more 1-cost C1 units than you need 6-cost heavy-hitters, it was implied that some units would be more common than others. One (unverified) theory is that the first strip of units in a standard booster may contain "common" (i.e., cheap) units while the second may contain "uncommon" units (i.e., expensive).

While Columbia has not been forthcoming with details about how units are being distributed, the statistics compiled here seem to strongly imply that units will be released in waves. About 120 units (12 or 13 units per race, 20 Chaos, 5 Werebeasts, 2 Treasures, and 7 Artifacts) were in the first wave. It appears that once that run of boosters is out, a second wave will be released (same booster box, same SKU) with a new assortment of units. While this wave theory has not been verified by Columbia directly (except by some oblique hints in the FAQ), the evidence compiled by BGG users to this point is extremely compelling.

We are attempting to compile a comprehensive list of units in v2 at the bottom of this page.


Suggestions for Assigning Units

Part of the fun of WK is the diversity of the units and armies. The armies include a base set of 'core' units which give the various armies their individual feeling. CG has gone even further, proving a wide selection of 'special' units, including chaos monsters, artifacts, werebeasts, etc. Sometimes, however, this diversity can be somewhat daunting, and many new players are bewildered by the range of choices.

While there is no 'right' answer, there are some issues that you should consider before assigning the units.

  • The maps have a lot of water. If you want all the armies to have an equal shot on most maps, be sure to distribute fliers and aquatics to armies that need them. If you don't give any to say, the dwarves, that might be interesting, but you want to be aware of what you're doing.
  • Part of the appeal of the game is the distinct feel of the armies, so be cautious of diluting the armies too much. The dwarves are slow, sturdy mountain folk. Adding a bunch of nymphs or something might feel sort of strange.

(I hope other folks add some issues.)


Guidelines for Creating Scenarios

Creating interesting, well-balanced scenarios is not easy, but the experimentation process is one of the appeals of the WK game package.

In order for a scenario to work, one of the players must be forced by circumstances to act against another player. The key flaw with the "basic" scenario included in the Wizard Kings rulebook (where both players get one board and 50GP to spend, and whoever controls the most production at the end of the game wins) is that inaction appears a clearly better strategy than action. Because defenders tend to have advantages in combat (firing first, getting pursuit fires if the attacker fails to dislodge them in 3 battle rounds, and the availability of cheap Castles), you may well be better off waiting for your opponent to impale himself on your defenses rather than attacking yourself. This will be a problem even if inaction just appears stronger than action (perhaps because all those strength-one blocks look scary), even if it is not.

So, all Wizard Kings scenarios must clearly force the hand of at least one player by putting them in a losing situation on turn 1. There are plenty of ways to do this, and you need only look at other wargames to see lots of good situations to mimic.

A good one that crops up all the time in history is where one side starts out strong and the other weak, but the weaker side receives massive reinforcements at some point, and the initial side must win before those reinforcements kick in (or better yet, the reinforcements must win the game for the initial defender by driving back the original attacker.

Or one side could start weak, and win by denying the attacker ultimate victory.

You can pick almost any historical conflict, from ancient to modern, and recreate the general dynamics to make an interesting Wizard Kings scenario.

Multi-player scenarios are particularly tricky, however. Any multi-way free-for-all will ultimately become a game of diplomacy rather than tactics. This may be desirable, but if you'd prefer a multi-player scenario with more action and less diplomacy, you need to address the same problems, but here, they have more dimensions. Again, looking to historical conflicts and other wargames is the easy answer. In Columbia's game Napoleon, which plays well with 3, one strong aggressor must defeat two individually weaker defenders before they can combine. In Histogames' Friedrich, one strong defender must hold off four weaker, but of varying strength, aggressors until a clock runs out. In Avalon Hill's Successors, players compete as individual factions, but can aim for many different victory conditions (legitimacy, prestige, different royal successors) which kick in at different times and force players to take an active role. World War II combines many factors, with a strong early/weak late power with a central position having to deal with multiple surrounding nations who will ultimately be much stronger.

The additional issue with multi-player scenarios is that all players must be involved in the game. To take the WWII example, many games (including Axis & Allies: Europe) fail because if Germany defeats Russia in the first few turns, the game will be over and the Western Allies never got to do anything. A good scenario will ensure that with competent play, the scenario will go for a while and all players will participate.

Multi-player scenarios are very tricky to balance properly, in the sense of balance meaning keeping all the players involved and active. And unlike for two-player scenarios, looking to other games is not always helpful; a Wizard Kings scenario that looked to Avalon Hill's Kingmaker game for inspiration would be tricky to implement, because in Kingmaker the attacker is not penalized in combat to the degree he is in Wizard Kings.

Game balance is difficult to ensure without lots of playtesting, and Wizard Kings Second Edition has made it harder because you never know who will be playing with what mix of blocks. Perfect balance is elusive; with a game like Wizard Kings, it is more important that the scenario be fun than balanced, and fun means action. However, it also means that both players should feel like they are competitive most of the time, so one side should not be ridiculously favored. Fortunately, in Wizard Kings it's easy to tweak balance by giving one side or the other a few less gold at start. If you decide to limit access to blocks for players who have large collections (say, to 5 Chaos blocks or 25 blocks total), a more minor balance provision can be to give one side or the other a greater or lesser number of blocks.

Here are a few specific tips:

1. The impetus to act can not be subtle. By looking at the scenario, both players should easily see who is the attacker and who is the defender, and how (if) those dynamics change, and who has to accomplish what in order to win.

2. For both Wizard Kings First and Second editions, if players buy large block pools (either by adding a number of Chaos expansions in First or many boosters in Second edition), scenarios can break in unexpected ways because armies will have a far greater range of capabilities than you planned on (for example, they may have access to tons of flyers or aquatics). It may be sensible to make the players choose a limited selection of blocks to play with before the game begins (say, by limiting a player to 4 or 5 Chaos units in 1st Edition).

3. WK1 and WK2 have rather different dynamics, and scenario designers must take this into account. In a generic attacker vs. defender scenario in WK1, an attacker could succeed in pressing his advantage with a fairly small edge in initial GP allotments, if the defender was forced set up dispersed and the attacker could concentrate their forces. In WK2, attackers will need a much greater preponderance of force to take defended cities. Defending Feudals and Dwarves (with their cheap City Folk units) will be even tougher to evict. Designers must be especially wary of a scenario defender's ability to build cheap castles quickly at critical chokepoints. In general, WK1 scenarios should not be expected to work well (or even at all) with WK2 rules unless the initial GP allotments are 50GP or less.

4. Specific city objectives can be tricky. Forcing an attacker to take a specific city can sometimes allow the defender to load up that city with multiple castles and take on all comers (this is somewhat less the case in 2nd Edition because gold has to be spent where it is produced, so all reinforcements the defender buys can't immediately go to a specific hex). If an attacker is forced to take a specific city to win, he should be able to bring substantial force to bear to do it, or the defender must be forced to defend the remainder of his empire as well to retain sufficient production to defend the capital.

5. For whoever is on the offensive, that player should have multiple routes to victory. A scenario where the attacker is forced to batter his way through a narrow corridor will be much less interesting than a scenario where the attacker can threaten by sea or by several different land approaches.

6. Keep an eye on which armies specialize in which terrain types. Elves defending on boards with lots of woods hexes will be much stronger than Elves defending on boards with desert and mountains. Feudals will be much stronger in any scenario that depends upon taking or holding cities, all other things being equal. Terrain can sometimes matter a lot, and bear that in mind when picking matchups for your scenarios (this matters much more in 1st Edition than in 2nd). An interesting basis for many scenarios is simply to pick a terrain layout and then match up an army for whom that terrain is highly favorable against an army for whom that same terrain is very difficult.

7. With the above thought in mind, a lot of interesting scenarios can be generated just by geography. Wizard Kings has a wide variety of maps and configurations; just pulling out some maps and seeing what they look like put together in various configurations can inspire scenarios.

8. Smaller scenarios will be easier to get right than larger ones.

9. Remember that Wizard Kings is fundamentally a game of attrition. The side that can get ahead in the attrition game (the side for whom production minus losses is most favorable) will ultimately control the battlefield. Always be sure to sanity check the production math on asymmetrical scenarios, to be sure that both sides have a chance to come out ahead on these numbers, or that there is not an insurmountable production disadvantage for one side or the other.

10. Try to keep special rules to a minimum. A scenario can be made more interesting by introducing a single, dramatic special rule that fundamentally changes the game. But too many smaller, fiddly special rules can make a scenario awkward.

Some interesting special rules that can change the game:
- Some/all blocks can be eliminated permanently, instead of just Wizards
- Instead of freely recruiting, a player has to build up a reserve by drawing blocks at random from a bag (as in Crusader Rex).
- It can sometimes be a good idea to put some small elements of the map "out of play". If a configuration has a small island on one map edge (that would normally link up with an adjoining map) that would be better off ignored, you can always remove it.


Errata

The Wizard Kings game spans many armies plus expansions plus 16 maps. Although the rules are simple for a wargame, they are still 8 pages covering movement, terrain, building, etc. Therefore, while CG aspires to perfection, it is not surprising that errors end up in the final product.

The only way an issue definitely becomes an errata is for the publisher to make a public statement. Nevertheless, there are some issues in the rules that are clearly inconsistent. Also, there are issues that, while not technically errors, become apparent after a few play sessions. These are not technically 'errata', but they seem to rise above the level of 'house rule'. This list seeks to compile those issues that rise above the level of personal taste and are rather glaring issues.

Errata for v1

Most of the errata revolve around the cost of units. The cost of a unit is based on a formula that accounts for the combat ability, combat speed, and movement range. Some units violate this formula, and CG has suggested at various times that these deviations are errors. Errors include:

  • Dwarven catapults are too expensive by 1 gp
  • The Undead Sacrifice spell should have one extra attack die

The following are not technically errors, but probably wrong.

  • Demon chaos unit is too cheap by 1 gp. While the demon chaos unit follows the formula, it has a powerful spell. It is cheaper for the demon to cast this spell than for a wizard, and the demon has other combat abilities as well.

Errata for v2

As of Apr 7, 2007 CG had not officially announced any errata for v2, but as customers have studied the game some questions have arisen.

  • Feudal 1st level spell "Foe Begone" seems much too powerful; it should either be level 2 or less powerful (although Feudal is the only army that otherwise lacks a "targeting allowed" damage spell, so this may dampen this problem a bit).

Tom Dalgliesh (designer) replied to me about this on 4/16/07: "Make it Level 2."

  • Another option if you want to keep "Foe Begone" a 1st level spell is to make it 1d6-3 units are retreated. It compares similarly to the Undead spell "Crypt Smell". 1d6-3 will average 1 unit retreated with a 50% chance of not retreating any unit. "Crypt Smell" averages two thirds (.66) a unit and has a 33% chance of not retreating any units.
  • Another option to keep "Foe Begone" a 1st level spell is to make it 1d3 - 1 which averages 1 unit retreated with a 33% chance of not retreating any units.
  • Undead spell "Sacrifice" seems to contradict the v2 rule that wizards cannot kill units; it should probably be an exception to the rule, and ideally CG will clarify this.

Tom wrote: "This spell is an exception and allows elimination."

  • What restrictions are on spells that bring one unit from an adjacent hex into a battle?

Tom wrote (4/25/07): "Unengaged units only can come. [...] The unit must be able to move there, normally. Bringing a flyer is clearly the easiest option."

  • Can I build a unit at STR 1 and then start a combat with the unit and use the Cleric "Bless" spell and Barbarian "Milk and Honey" spell to raise the strength of the unit

Tom wrote (4/25/07): "No problem with your combo."

  • Can a cursed unit retreat? If an attacking unit loses it's last turn due to a curse, does it die because it could not retreat?

Tom wrote (4/25/07): "Yikes!" -- [ed: I think this is inconclusive and may need more clarification]

  • Can fliers end their turn in a mountain hex?

Tom wrote (4/25/07): "Yes. Many like war eagles and harpies are really mountain dwellers as well, but we ignore that."

  • Does the optional reinforcement rule apply to units that were summoned to combat via spells?

Tom wrote (4/25/07): "If you mean the optional "Combat Reserves" rule, then summoned units should be placed in reserve unless exempted (as with the Herald spell)."

  • The Amazons have a spell that summons a chariot, but the chariot is fairly rare. This spell needs to be modified somehow.

Tom wrote: "A chariot is a chariot. Perhaps we could expand the spell later to include more Amazon units, like the Elephant, but for now if you do not have a chariot, then don't cast this spell. Players can, if desired, agree to summon any Amazon unit of equal or lesser cost value."

[Note: This Q&A exchange on the Chariot is based on a misunderstanding. The effect of this spell is not to summon a Chariot unit, but to allow Chariots to fire as A2s instead of B2s. This spell was rather lame in WK1 when the Amazons actually had a bunch of Chariots by default, it's even lamer now that they don't.]

In a separate response, Tom wrote (4/25/07): "For now, allow any unit with speed '3' to charge."

And lastly, I asked him when do Wizard spell retreats take effect? Immediate, round 1, or round 2? Answer: immediate.


Army Lists

The following lists describe the available units from each army, along with the basic properties of each unit. Note that minor differences might be seen in units with the same name. (For example, there are at least two different Scepter artifacts with different properties.)

Because many new units are included in this version, and because of the collectible nature, some players may not receive a particular unit in their armies. Until and unless Columbia releases a full inventory of what's available in 2.0, please help contribute to these lists!

Important Note: It appears that there was a distribution error in the original batch of boosters printed by Columbia, and only a subset of the total units were actually included. If you were an early adopter, you probably received these boosters. However, it appears that the early distribution issues have been ironed out and that all units should now be available in the current boosters.

Note: Units included with the base game are listed in bold italics.

Amazons

  • Amazon (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Bowlyn (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Bowlyn (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Chariot (B2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Charmer (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Guardian (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Harpy (A1, Move 2/Fly, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Heroine (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • Siren (B3, Move 2/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Tigress (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Tigress (A2, Move 3/Swamp, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Witch (B+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Elephant (B4, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Medusa (A3, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 5, 3 Steps)

Barbarians

  • Archer (A1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Berserker (C3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Hero (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • Horsebow (A3, Move 3/Forest, Cost 6, 3 Steps)
  • Huscarl (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Huscarl (C2, Move 2/City, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Mongol (B2, Move 4/None, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Runeka (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Runeka (B+, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Orcana (B1, Move 4/Aquatic, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Spearmaid (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spearmaid (C1, Move 2/Desert, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Valkyrie (A2, Move 2/Fly, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Viking (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)

Dwarves

  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Catapult (A3, Move 1/City, Cost 4, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Gnome (B1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Hero (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • High Guard (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Khabar (B3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Low Guard (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Low Guard (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Mage (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Mage (B+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Miner (D2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Slinger (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Warbird (B3, Move 3/Fly, Cost 5, 3 Steps)

Elves

  • Assassin (A3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 4, 2 Steps)
  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Glader (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Heroine (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • Magus (B+, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Pegasus (A3, Move 3/Fly, Cost 6, 3 Steps)
  • Pixie (B1, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Ranger (A2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Sprite (A1, Move 2/Fly, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Treek (C3, Move 1/Forest, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Undine (C2, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Unicorn (B1, Move 3/Forest, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • White Ship (B2, Move 4/Aquatic, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Wicana (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)


Feudals

  • Assassin (A3, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 2 Steps)
  • Bowman (A1, Move 2/City, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Bowman (A1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Crossbow (B3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Hero (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • Knight (B2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Kog (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Sergeant (B1, Move 3/Forest, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Templar (C2, Move 2/City, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • War Dog (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Wizard (B+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Wizard (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Yeoman (C2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 2, 3 Steps)

Orcs

  • Assassin (A3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 2 Steps)
  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Gargoyle (A1, Move 3/Fly, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Goblin (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Goblin (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Great Orc (C3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Queen (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 3, 2 Steps)
  • Hero (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • Ogre (B3, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Orc (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Shakla (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Shaman (B+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Trog (B4, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Troll (B2, Move 3/Swamp, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Wolfguard (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 4 Steps)

Undead

  • Bone Dragon (A4, Move 2/Fly, Cost 5, 2 Steps)
  • Castle (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Castle (B4, Move 0, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Cleric (C2, Move 2/Cleric, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Deathbow (A2, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Ghost Ship (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Ghoul (B3, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Hero (A4, Move 3/City, Cost 4, 1 Step)
  • Mummy (C3, Move 2/Desert, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Necrom (A+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Necrom (B+ Wizard, Move 2/Fly, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Skeleton (C2, Move 2/Desert, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Vampire (A3, Move 3/Fly, Cost 6, 2 Steps)
  • Varghan (B2, Move 3/Swamp, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Wraith (A1, Move 2/Fly, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Zombie (C1, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Zombie (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)

Chaos

  • Basilisk (A4, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 6, 2 Steps)
  • Bireme (B2, Move 2/Aquatic, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Cavebear (B3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Centaur (B3, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Cockatrice (B2, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Cyclops (B4, Move 3/Forest, Cost 6, 2 Steps)
  • Demon (A2, Move 3/Fly, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Fire Dragon (A4, Move 4/Fly, Cost 8, 2 Steps)
  • Giant (B4, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 2 Steps)
  • Golak (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 2 Steps)
  • Griffin (A3, Move 2/Fly, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Haven (D3, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps) - +1 to sea transport capacity
  • Hellcat (B3, Move 3/City, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Hellhound (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Hippogryf (A2, Move 2/Fly, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Hornet (A1, Move 3/Fly, Cost 4, 4 Steps)
  • Ice Dragon (A5, Move 3/Fly, Cost 8, 2 Steps)
  • Kraken (B3, Move 2/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Manticore (B3, Move 2/Desert, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Mantis (B2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Minotaur (B3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Nessie (B4, Move 2/Aquatic, Cost 5, 2 Steps)
  • Pirate (C3, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Scorpion (C2, Move 2/Desert, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Serpent (C4, Move 2/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Snowbear (B3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Spectre (A1, Move 2/Fly, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Spider (B4, Move 2/Desert, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Trireme (B3, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Wurm (C4, Move 3/Desert, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Wyvern (A3, Move 3/Fly, Cost 6, 3 Steps)

Werebeasts

  • Werebat (A1, Move 2/Fly, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Werebear (C3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Wereboar (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Weredragon (A3, Move 2/Fly, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Weremole (C2, Move 1/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Wererat (B1, Move 2/City, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Wereshark (B3, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Weretiger (B3, Move 3/Swamp, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Werewolf (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 4 Steps)

Treasures

  • Gems (D3, Move 2/None, Cost 10, 4 Steps)
  • Gold (D2, Move 2/None, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Silver (D1, Move 2/None, Cost 1, 4 Steps)

Artifacts

  • Battle Axe (B4, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Crown (Level II, Cost 6, 4 Steps)
  • Lamp (Level II, Cost 6, 4 Steps)
  • Mace (B4, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Ring (Level III, Cost 9, 4 Steps)
  • Sceptre (C3, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Sceptre (C4, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Shield (C3 or Cleric, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Sword (B3, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Sword (B4, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Tome (Level I, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Trident (A2, Cost 2, 3 Steps)


Expansion Strips

It appears each expansion box contains 2 strips of regular units plus 1 strip of Chaos units, Werebeasts, and Artifacts. I'm listing the strips here in the hope we can get some idea about rarity. I've allowed for the possibility that the first and second of the regular strips are selected from different sets. Also, if you open a box and get a strip that's already listed here, please increment the number next to it, so that we can get an idea of how rare each strip is.

Note that all the "regular units" strips contain exactly 1 unit for each army, and always in the order Amazon, Barbarian, Dwarf, Elf, Feudal, Orc, Undead.

First standard units strips
(33) Amazon, Archer, Low Guard, Glader, Templar, Castle, Necrom
(28) Siren, Mongol, Warbird, Undine, Castle, Shakla, Mummy
(28) Bowlyn, Berserker, Hero, Castle, Bowman, Cleric, Zombie
(26) Witch, Spearmaid, Castle, Ranger, Sergeant, Ogre, Vampire
(23) Chariot, Viking, High Guard, Magus, Hero, Goblin, Necrom
(22) Witch, Viking, Miner, Treek, Sergeant, Troll, Castle
(22) Elephant, Runeka, Low Guard, Undine, War Dog, Assassin, Necrom
(21) Elephant, Spearmaid, High Guard, Cleric, Templar, Shaman, Mummy
(20) Castle, Berserker, Khabar, Ranger, Crossbow, Troll, Cleric
(18) Harpy, Castle, Low Guard, Ranger, Wizard, Gargoyle, Deathbow
(20) Medusa, Horsebow, Khabar, Cleric, Spear, Trog, Wraith
(16) Tigress, Runeka, Catapult, Glader, Assassin, Goblin, Bone Dragon
(16) Bowlyn, Valkyrie, Mage, Undine, Yeoman, Ogre, Wraith
(15) Tigress, Spearmaid, Khabar, Wicana, Cleric, Trog, Skeleton
(12) Heroine, Castle, Warbird, White Ship, Wizard, Orc, Mummy
(3) Chariot, Mongol, Cleric, Sprite, Bowman, Shaman, Ghost Ship
(1) Harpy, Horsebow, Catapult, Treek, Kog, Cleric, Varghan

Second standard units strips
(27) Amazon, Archer, Mage, Heroine, Spear, Castle, Zombie
(26) Charmer, Huscarl, Gnome, Castle, Knight, Goblin, Skeleton
(26) Harpy, Orcana, Low Guard, Assassin, Wizard, Great Orc, Ghoul
(24) Tigress, Cleric, Gnome, Unicorn, Knight, Trog, Necrom
(22) Guardian, Horsebow, Castle, White Ship, Wizard, Hero, Vampire
(21) Cleric, Huscarl, Warbird, Wicana, Spear, Wolfguard, Ghoul
(19) Castle, Hero, Catapult, Wicana, Kog, Orc, Ghost Ship
(21) Siren, Mongol, Gnome, Unicorn, Castle, Shakla, Hero
(20) Bowlyn, Huscarl, Mage, Undine, Crossbow, Gargoyle, Varghan
(18) Chariot, Mongol, Cleric, Sprite, Bowman, Shaman, Ghost Ship
(19) Harpy, Horsebow, Catapult, Treek, Kog, Cleric, Varghan
(19) Charmer, Valkyrie, Cleric, Unicorn, Knight, Wolfguard, Zombie
(16) Amazon, Archer, Mage, Glader, Kog, Troll, Skeleton
(15) Chariot, Berserker, Slinger, Pegasus, Bowman, Queen, Deathbow
(10) Guardian, Runeka, Miner, Pixie, Cleric, Great Orc, Castle
(5) Castle, Berserker, Khabar, Ranger, Crossbow, Troll, Cleric
(2) Siren, Mongol, Warbird, Undine, Castle, Shakla, Mummy
(1) Elephant, Spearmaid, High Guard, Cleric, Templar, Shaman, Mummy

Chaos strips
(25) Cavebear, Cyclops, Kraken, Griffin, Wererat, Gold, Sword
(21) Fire Dragon, Centaur, Manticore, Bireme, Werewolf, Silver, Sword
(20) Cavebear, Hippogryf, Spectre, Kraken, Werebat, Silver, Crown
(19) Wyvern, Manticore, Bireme, Golak, Werebat, Silver, Sceptre
(18) Ice Dragon, Spider, Demon, Minotaur, Werebear, Silver, Tome
(18) Fire Dragon, Cockatrice, Trireme, Scorpion, Weremole, Gems, Shield
(18) Nessie, Minotaur, Hellhound, Wyvern, Weretiger, Silver, Ring
(18) Hellhound, Trireme, Demon, Spider, Werewolf, Gold, Sceptre
(17) Wurm, Nessie, Giant, Ice Dragon, Weredragon, Gold, Tome
(16) Basilisk, Centaur, Hippogryf, Trireme, Werewolf, Silver, Tome
(15) Hellhound, Demon, Cavebear, Spider, Wereshark, Gold, Crown
(14) Spectre, Basilisk, Scorpion, Snowbear, Weredragon, Silver, Lamp
(13) Hornet, Hippogryf, Centaur, Haven, Werebear, Silver, Battle Axe
(12) Manticore, Spider, Pirate, Snowbear, Wererat, Gems, Lamp
(11) Spectre, Demon, Serpent, Haven, Wereshark, Silver, Mace
(11) Bireme, Minotaur, Centaur, Griffin, Wererat, Silver, Tome
(10) Hellcat, Cyclops, Nessie, Cockatrice, Wereboar, Gold, Trident
(11) Mantis, Wyvern, Hellcat, Kraken, Weremole, Gold, Sword
(11) Wyvern, Pirate, Bireme, Wurm, Wereboar, Silver, Ring
(10) Giant, Griffin, Golak, Serpent, Weretiger, Silver, Shield

Ancient Kings strips
(8) Fortis, Hoplite, Spear, Assyrian, Cavalry, Spear, Warlord
(7) Eques, Archer, Cavalry, Magus, Temple, Spear, Spear
(7) Auxilia, Cavalry, Monk, Parthian, Chariot, Junk, Spear
(6) Legion, Polis, Kraken, Griffin, Cavalry, Sanju, Wolf
(6) Eques, Polis, Ninja, Satrap, Nubian, Archer, Turk
(5) Ballista, Tyrant, Samurai, Parthian, Sherden, Sword, Hun Bow
(4) Fortis, Trireme, Spear, Galley, Spear, Dragon, Shaman
(4) Flamen, Peltast, Tanar, Elephant, Temple, Tartar, Shaman
(4) Navis, Cyclops, Samurai, Archer, Chariot, Sword, Camp
(4) Auxilia, Pythia, Shiro, Assyrian, Felucca, Triada, Skuda
(3) Legion, Pythia, Shiro, Galley, Pharoah, Sanju, Spear
(4) Centaur, Peltast, Spear, Fortress, Priest, Archer, Hun Bow
(3) Sagittari, Cavalry, Monk, Fortress, Felucca, Warlord, Hun Bow
(3) Legion, Hoplite, Ronin, Immortal, Spear, Sword, Follower
(3) Sagittari, Trireme, Ronin, Immortal, Spear, Tartar, Sword
(3) Auxilia, Archer, Samurai, Assyrian, Priest, Junk, Spear
(2) Navis, Greek Fire, Shogun, Archer, Spear, Palace, Skudar
(2) Caesar, Trireme, Cavalry, Magus, Sphinx, Spear, Camp
(1) Flamen, Hoplite, Tanar, Immortal, Sherden, Palace, Hun Bow
(1) Legion, Hoplite, Samurai, Assyrian, Nubian, Sword, Turk


Ancient Kings

Chinese

  • Archer (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Archer (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Dragon (A3, Move 3/Flyer, Cost 6, 2 Steps)
  • Junk (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Sanju (B1, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Sword (C2, Move 2/City, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Sword (C2, Move 2/Desert, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Sword (C2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Sword (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Sword (C2, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Tartar (A2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Tartar (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Triada (A3, Move 2/City, Cost 5, 2 Steps)
  • Warlord (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 4 Steps)

Egyptian

  • Cavalry (B2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 4, 4 Steps)
  • Chariot (B3, Move 3/Desert, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Felucca (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Nubian (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Nubian (A2, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Pharoah (A3, Move 2/City, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Priest (B1, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Sherden (C3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Sherden (C3, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Sphinx (B3, Move 1/Desert, Cost 3, 2 Steps)
  • Temple (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 3 Steps)

Greek

  • Archer (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Archer (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Cavalry (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Cavalry (B2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Cyclops (B4, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 6, 2 Steps)
  • Greek Fire (A3, Move 1/City, Cost 4, 2 steps)
  • Hoplite (C2, Move 2/City, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Hoplite (C2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Hoplite (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Peltast (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Peltast (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Polis (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Pythia (B2, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Trireme (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 4 Steps)
  • Tyrant (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 4 Steps)

Hun

  • Camp (C3, Move 2, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Follower (D2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Hun Bow (A2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Hun Bow (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Hun Bow (A2, Move 3/Mountain, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Hun Bow (A2, Move 3/Swamp, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Shaman (B1, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Shaman (B2, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Skudar (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Skudar (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Desert, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Sword (C2, Move 2/City, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Turk (B2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Turk (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Warlord (A2, Move 3/City, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Wolf (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 4 Steps)

Japanese

  • Cavalry (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Cavalry (A2, Move 3/Mountain, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Kraken (B3, Move 2/Aquatic, Cost 4, 4 Steps)
  • Monk (B2, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Ninja (A3, Move 2/City, Cost 5, 2 Steps)
  • Ronin (C2, Move 2/Forest, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Ronin (C2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Samurai (B3, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Samurai (B3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Samurai (B3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Shiro (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Shogun (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Spear (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Tanar (B2, Move 2/Aquatic, Cost 3, 4 Steps)

Persian

  • Archer (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Archer (A2, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Assyrian (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Assyrian (C1, Move 2/Forest, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Assyrian (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Elephant (B3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Fortress (C4, Move 0, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Galley (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Griffon (A2, Move 2/Flyer, Cost 5, 2 Steps)
  • Immortal (B2, Move 2/City, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Immortal (B2, Move 2/Desert, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Immortal (B2, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Magus (B1, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Magus (B2, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Parthian (A2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Parthian (A2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Satrap (A2, Move 2/City, Cost 4, 4 Steps)

Roman

  • Auxilia (C1, Move 2/City, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Auxilia (C1, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Auxilia (C1, Move 2/Swamp, Cost 1, 4 Steps)
  • Ballista (A2, Move 1/City, Cost 3, 3 Steps)
  • Caesar (A3, Move 2/City, Cost 5, 4 Steps)
  • Centaur (B3, Move 3/Forest, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Eques (B2, Move 3/Forest, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Eques (B2, Move 3/Desert, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Flamen (B1, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 4 Steps)
  • Flamen (B2, Move 2/God, Cost 2, 3 Steps)
  • Fortis (C3, Move 0, Cost 1, 3 Steps)
  • Legion (C3, Move 2/City, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Legion (C3, Move 2/Desert, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Legion (C3, Move 2/Forest, Cost 3, 4 Steps)
  • Navis (B2, Move 3/Aquatic, Cost 4, 3 Steps)
  • Sagittari (A3, Move 2/City, Cost 5, 3 Steps)
  • Sagittari (A3, Move 2/Mountain, Cost 5, 3 Steps)

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